2009 NACADA Annual Conference   Action Plan V Advising Syllabus (Concurrent 229)
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2009 NACADA Annual Conference Action Plan V Advising Syllabus (Concurrent 229)

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Concurrent Session 229: Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus ...

Concurrent Session 229: Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
AC,DA
2009-10-02
3:15:00 PM - 4:15:00 PM
Grand Hyatt- Texas Ballroom B

The advising syllabus is a brilliant concept. It articulates and validates the work of academic advising as teaching. It concisely lists student responsibilities and timelines. It communicates the institution's commitments to quality, accessibility of resources, and acknowledges the nature of partnership between the school and student. THEN WHY, in practice, does it struggle to engage and impact the academic success of the students who most need its benefits? To answer this question we will begin with and draw upon the very principles of developmental advising. We will employ adolescent psychology as we consider student expectations and their need for ownership. From deep in the students' heart we will invite, prompt, and celebrate real learning, maturity, accountability, and progressive accomplishment. We will do this … with the Action Plan.

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  • I. Introductions: Introduce presenters and topic II. Foundations: Discuss the importance of standards, advising as teaching, and the benefits of an advising syllabus. III. Review adolescent psychology and briefly consider implications from research on specific student population groups, e.g., Students-at-risk, First Generation College (FGC), Undecided, High-Achieving, Non-Traditional, Transfer, and First-Time Freshman Students.IV. Share examples of current programs and efforts to support retention at a public four-year universityV. Question & Answer
  • Pass out Deloitte & Touche summary of Millennials.“They know the way things go down and are no longer naïve about the workings of the world and the intentions of businesses and other organizations.”Peter Sheahan from “Generation Y: Thriving and Surviving with Generation Y at Work.”What percent of students nationally study two hours or more forevery hour in class?12% (b) 20% (c) 31% (d)Because individual effort and involvement are the critical determinants of college impact, institutions should focus on the ways they canshape their academic, interpersonal, and extracurricular offerings to encourage studentengagement.
  • So briefly, here’s how it goes …NACADA was created.NACADA created its statement of values and concept of advising documents (which have been updated and revised as lately as 2005).NACADA created a task force, charged them with providing input to the CAS in 1980.These goals form the basis for the development of the CAS Standards for Academic AdvisingPrescriptive: Literally, medically … prescribing the activitiesDevelopmental: Winston, et. al. (1984) describe academic advising as follows: "Developmental academic advising is defined as a systematic process based on a close student-advisor relationship intended to aid students in achieving educational, career, and personal goals through the utilization of the full range of institutional and community resources" (p.19).To advise a student developmentally, Kramer (1999) suggests the following: know/apply student development theory. focus on students; their on-going needs over an extended period of time. One advising session builds upon another. challenge students to achieve their learning potential and to take academic risks. view students as active partners actively engaged in intellectual and personal growth. help students think about and articulate what is important to them in their academic as well as their personal lives. set short-term as well as long-term goals, discuss ways to achieve those goals, and help the student monitor progress in fulfilling those goals. Advising as TeachingAppreciative Advising: Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is an organizational development tool that focuses on bringing out the best in people and organizations, instead of viewing them as problems that need to be solved. In this paper, we will explore how academic advisers might incorporate the principles of AI into their advising interactions with students.Student-Centered Advising: Syllabus as a tool in Teaching
  • Pass out Page 53.Desirable Student Learning and Development Outcomes -- Examples of AchievementIntellectual growth: Examines information about academic majors and minors; Understands the requirements of an academic degree plan, as well as institutional policies and procedures; Employs critical thinking in problem solving on selection of major and course selection; Uses complex information from a variety of sources including personal experience and observation to form a decision or opinion; Declares a major; Achieves educational goals; Applies previously understood information and concepts to a new situation or setting; Demonstrates understanding of a general education and expresses appreciation for literature, the fine arts, mathematics, sciences, and social sciencesPersonal and educational goals: Sets, articulates, and pursues individual goals; Articulates personal and educational goals and objectives; Uses personal and educational goals to guide decisions; Produces a schedule of classes in consultation with advisors. Understands the effect of one’s personal and education goals on othersEnhanced self-esteem: Shows self-respect and respect for others; Initiates actions toward achievement of goals; Evaluates reasonable risks with regard to academic course selection and course load when conferring with advisors Realistic self-appraisal: Evaluates personal and academic skills, abilities, and interests and uses this appraisal to establish appropriate educational plans; Makes decisions and acts in congruence with personal values and other personal and life demands; Focuses on areas of academic ability and interest and mitigates academic weaknesses; Uses information on degree program requirements, course load, and course availability to construct a course schedule; Seeks opportunities for involvement in co-curricular activities; Seeks feedback from advisors; Learns from past experiences; Seeks services for personal needs (e.g., writing labs and counseling)Clarified values: Demonstrates ability to evaluate personal values and beliefs regarding academic integrity and other ethical issues; Articulates personal values; Acts in congruence with personal values; Identifies personal, work, and lifestyle values and explains how they influence decision-making in regard to course selection, course load, and major and minor selectionsCareer choices: Describes career choice and choices of academic major and minor based on interests, values, skills, and abilities; Documents knowledge, skills, and accomplishments resulting from formal education, work experience, community service and volunteer experiences; Makes the connections between classroom and out-of-classroom learning; Identifies the purpose and role of career services in the development and attainment of academic and career goalsIndependence: Operates autonomously by attending advising sessions or programs or by seeking the advice of advisors in a timely fashion; Correctly interprets and applies degree audit information; Selects, schedules, and registers for courses in consultation with advisorsEffective communication: Communicates personal and academic strengths and weaknesses that affect academic plans; Demonstrates ability to use campus technology resources; Composes appropriate questions when inquiring about particular requirements, departments, and resourcesLeadership development: Articulates leadership philosophy or style; Serves in a leadership position in student, community, or professional organizations; Comprehends the dynamics of a group; Exhibits democratic principles as a leader; Exhibits ability to visualize a group purpose and desired outcomes Healthy behavior: Exhibits personal behaviors that promote a healthy lifestyle; Articulates the relationship between health and wellness and accomplishing life long goals; Exhibits behaviors that advance a healthy campus and communityMeaningful Interpersonal Relationships: Develops relationships with academic advisors, faculty members, students, and other institution staff to be engaged with the institution in meaningful ways; Listens to and considers others’ points of view; Treats others with respectCollaboration: Works cooperatively with others; Seeks the involvement of others; Seeks feedback from others; Contributes to achievement of group goals; Exhibits effective listening skillsSocial responsibility: Understands the requirements of the codes of conduct; Understands and practices principles of academic integrity; Understands and participates in relevant governance systems; Understands, abides by, and participates in the development, maintenance, and orderly change of community, social, and legal standards or norms; Appropriately challenges the unfair, unjust, or uncivil behavior of other individuals or groups; Participates in service and volunteer activitiesSatisfying and productive lifestyles: Achieves balance among academic course load requirements, work, and leisure time; Develops plans to satisfy academic requirements, work expectations, and leisure pursuits; Identifies and works to overcome obstacles that hamper goal achievement; Functions on the basis of personal identity, ethical, spiritual, and moral values; Articulates long-term goals and objectivesAppreciating diversity: Selects course offerings that will increase understanding of one’s own and others’ identity and cultures; Seeks involvement with people different from oneself; Demonstrates an appreciation for diversity and the impact it has on societySpiritual awareness: Identifies campus and community spiritual and religious resources, including course offerings; Develops and articulates personal belief system; Understands roles of spirituality in personal and group values and behaviors
  • We tend to be prescriptive OR developmental, like a light switch. Advisors have the potential to provide what the students need, accomplish the institutions lofty goals, and “For example, under developmental advising tasks, they included conversations on topics other than academics, including students’ personal problems; self-esteem/interpersonal skills/study skills; student values, beliefs, and attitudes and the conflicts between them. According to the definition put forth by Fielstein et al. (1992), the prescriptive tasks involve assistance with course selection, schedule planning and registration; referrals to other student support services; explanation of degree requirements and review of student’s status in relation to them.The findings show that relational variables can exist across multiple approaches and their effect likely depends more on the advisor’s interpersonal skills and style rather than the approach itself. If the descriptions of various advising approaches, such as prescriptive, developmental, and others, include warmth and supportive relational dynamics, then the exploration of contingencies (i.e., the consideration of when to use which approach) can expand along with the practice of the approach.”
  • Constructivist approaches to human learning: This theory holds that masters of a skill often fail to take into account the implicit processes involved in carrying out complex skills when they are teaching novices.Bandura 1997: Cognitive Apprenticeships -- Experts model behavior, students learnAnderson 2000: In the cognitive stage, learners develop declarative understanding of the skill. In the associative stage, mistakes and misinterpretations learned in the cognitive stage are detected and eliminated while associations between the critical elements involved in the skill are strengthened. Finally, in the autonomous stage, the learner’s skill becomes honed and perfected until it is executed at an expert level.Anderson, J.R. (2000). Cognitive psychology and its implications. New York, NY: Worth Publishers. Bandura, A. (1997). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Brown, J. S., Collins, A., & Duguid, P. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18, 32-42. Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1987). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the craft of reading, writing and mathematics (Technical Report No. 403). BBN Laboratories, Cambridge, MA. Centre for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois. January, 1987. Instructional scaffolding. (2007, July 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:03, October 14, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Instructional_scaffolding&oldid=144464722Educational psychology. (2007, September 25). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:04, October 14, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Educational_psychology&oldid=160329760Cognitive apprenticeship. (2007, August 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:04, October 14, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cognitive_apprenticeship&oldid=152447643
  • Break into groups, discuss examples of syllabi and action plan documents.Consider questions, approaches, and an overall timeline to facilitate consistent messages, student ownership, and advisor accountability.

2009 NACADA Annual Conference   Action Plan V Advising Syllabus (Concurrent 229) 2009 NACADA Annual Conference Action Plan V Advising Syllabus (Concurrent 229) Presentation Transcript

  • Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.
    Abigail Adams (1744 - 1818), 1780
    We learn by example and by direct experience because there are real limits to the adequacy of verbal instruction.
    Malcolm Gladwell, Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, 2005
    Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then get busy and find out how to do it.
    Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)
    Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival.
    W. Edwards Deming (1900 - 1993)
    Only the curious will learn and only the resolute overcome the obstacles to learning. The quest quotient has always excited me more than the intelligence quotient.
    Eugene S. Wilson
  • Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
    2009 NACADA Annual ConferenceThursday, October 2, 2009
    Joshua BarronAssociate Director Nickki SmithSenior CounselorTexas Tech University Advising Center
    © 2007 Barron, Hansard
  • What do our advising students need?
    Shoutout
  • What do our advising students want?
    Shoutout
  • Session Outline
    The Challenges or “Where we are.”
    The Ideal or “Where we’re going.”
    The Proposal or“How we’re going to get there.”
    Implications for Practice or“Your Turn at the Wheel”
    Discussion/Q&A
  • Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
    The Challenges or “Where we are.”
  • The Challenges or “Where We Are”
    Who are they anyhow?
    History with Parents
    Coming of Age
    Treat Me How You’d Want to be Treated
    Streamlined and Efficient
    Skeptical & Cynical
    Timeline: Now.
  • The Challenges or “Where We Are”
    For that matter, who are we?
    Resource Constrained
    Pressed for Immediate Results
    Historically Undervalued
    Firefighters
    Doorkeepers
    Jugglers
    Ambitious Educators
  • Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
    The Ideal or “Where we’re going.”
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”With a Brief Review of Where We’ve Been
    The Evolution …
    NACADA Statement of Values & Concept of Advising
    Gordon/Habley: Goals for Academic Advising
    Center for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) in Higher Education – Standards for Academic Advising
    Developmental Advising
    Advising as Teaching, Appreciative Advising, & Student-Centered Advising
    The Syllabus in Teaching
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”NACADA Statement of Values & Concept of Advising
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”Gordon/Habley: Goals for Academic Advising
    Goals for Academic Advising
    Assisting students in self-understanding and self-acceptance (values clarification; understanding abilities, interests and limitations)
    Assisting students in considering their life goals by relating their interests, skills, abilities, and values to careers, the world of work, and the nature and purpose of higher education
    Assisting students in developing an educational plan consistent with their life goals and objectives
    Assisting students in developing decision-making skills
    • Providing accurate information about institutional policies, procedures, resources, and programs
    • Referring students to other institutional or community support services
    • Assisting students in evaluating or reevaluating progress toward established goals and educational plans
    • Providing information about students to the institution, college, academic departments, or some combination thereof.
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”Center for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) in Higher Education
    Student Learning & Development Outcomes:
    Intellectual growth
    Personal and educational goals
    Enhanced self-esteem
    Realistic self-appraisal
    Clarified values
    Career choices
    Independence
    Effective communication
    Leadership development
    Healthy behavior
    • Meaningful Interpersonal Relationships
    • Collaboration
    • Social responsibility
    • Satisfying and productive lifestyles
    • Appreciating diversity
    • Spiritual awareness
  • STOP
  • WOAH
  • Foundations of Academic AdvisingNACADA Statement of Values & Concept of Advising
    The Proposal or“How we’re going to get there.”
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”Varying Approaches and Advising as/is Teaching
    Prescriptive Approach
    Do this…
    Task/Assignment Basis
    Developmental Approach
    What do you think you should do?
    Ownership/Understanding Basis
    Learning Centered Approach
    Deliberately Transitional
    Leads to greater levels of self-directed learning
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”
    Advising syllabi should …
    Include a relevant overview of philosophy
    Look like a faculty syllabus
    Define advising
    Contain contact information
    Expectations and assignments for students
    Expectations and accountability for advisors
    Expected outcomes
    Tools, resources, and/or recommendations for students.
    E.g., calendars of advising events, book or web site recommendations, detailed location descriptions, or a blank line for advisors to personalize the syllabus with a recommendation.
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”
    To be effective in improving student success, expectations & responsibilities must translate into actions.
    To accomplish their goals, students must have a Personal Action Plan.
    A Personal Action Plan can not survive outside of an ongoingAction Planning (Advising) Process.
  • The Ideal or “Where we’re going”
    Action Plan Essentials
    Ever-Present, Consistent Usage & Messages
    Vision
    Outcomes that are:
    Tangible
    Practical
    Measurable
    Action Planning Essentials
    Ongoing, Relational Approach
    Developmentally Appropriate Scaffolding
    Prescriptive Introduction
    Progressively Developmental & Student Owned
  • Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
    Implications for Practice or“Your Turn at the Wheel”
  • Implications for Practice or“Your Turn at the Wheel”
    Action Plan …
    Roadmap to Possibilities
    www.discovery.ttu.edu/roadmap
  • Implications for Practice or“Your Turn at the Wheel”
    Items to Discuss/Practice
    Pick one item students MUST do.
    How is it reflected in a syllabus?
    How does it meet a CAS Higher Standard in Academic Advising?
    Where do you introduce students to the task?
    How do they develop ownership?
    How do you provide accountability and follow-up for this task?
    How do you assess your contribution to the student’s success?
    How do you celebrate with them?
  • Conclusions
    For Students
    Student readiness must be assessed to provide meaningful learning opportunities at the appropriate time. One size does not fit all.
    To be effective in improving student success, expectations & responsibilities must translate into actions.
    To accomplish their goals, students must have a Personal Action Plan.
    A Personal Action Plan can not survive outside of an ongoingAction Planning (Advising) Process.
    For Advisors & Programs
    Relationship is key.
    Every encounter matters, and each element of programs and protocols must be connected strategically.
    Show them once to model behavior and build student self-efficacy.
    Teach skills and correct errors.
    Become a coach and offer advice.
    Fade.
    Celebrate victories and milestones!
  • Action Plan: An Evolutionary Leap Forward for the Advising Syllabus
    Session Appendix
  • Appendix: References
    Allen, Mike, Witt, Paul L. & Wheeless, Lawrence R. (2006). The Role of Teacher Immediacy as a Motivational Factor in Student Learning: Using Meta-Analysis to Test a Causal Model. Communication Education, 55 (1), 0363-4523. Retrieved September 21, 2007, from http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/03634520500343368
    Evans, N.J, Forney, D.S. & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: Theory, practice, and research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
    Howe, N. & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising: The next great generation. New York : Vintage Books.
    http://www.deloitte.com/dtt/cda/doc/content/us_consulting_millennialfactsheet_080606.pdf
    http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/foru0211.htm
    Keeling, S. (2003). Advising the millennial generation. NACADA Journal, 23 (1&2), 30-36.
    Montano, C., Hunt, M., Boudreaux, L. “Improving the quality of student advising in higher education – A case study.” Total Quality Management & Business Excellence; Dec2005, Vol. 16 Issue 10, p1103-1125. Retrieved on September 20, 2007, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip,cookie,url,uid&db=bth&AN=19019698&loginpage=Login.asp&site=ehost-live
  • Appendix: References
    Mottarella, K., Fritzsche, B., & Cerabino, K. (2004). “What do Students Want in Advising? A Policy Capturing Study.” NACADA Journal v. 24, no. 49 (48-61). Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Research_Related/blue.pdf
    Raisman, N. (2002). Embrace the oxymoron: Customer service in higher education. Publisher: Year.
    Reynolds, M. (2004). “Faculty Advising in a Learner-Center Environment: A Small College Perspective.” Academic Advising Today. Volume 27, Number 2. NACADA. Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/AAT/NW27_2.htm
    Rozell, E., Pettijohn, C., Parker, R. S. (2004). “Customer-Oriented Selling: Exploring the Roles of Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Commitment.” Psychology & Marketing, Jun2004, Vol. 21 Issue 6, p405-424.
    Shields, Peggy. (1995). “Service Quality And Academic Advising: Practicing What We Preach.” Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.sbaer.uca.edu/research/swma/1995/pdf/22.pdf
    Smith, Joshua. (2002). “First-Year Student Perceptions of Academic Advisement: A Qualitative Study and Reality Check” NACADA Journal v. 22, no. 2 (29-49). Retrieved online September 20, 2007, from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Research_Related/red.pdf
    Spicuzza, Frank J. “A Customer Service Approach to Advising: Theory and Application.” NACADA Journal 12 (2): 49-58.
    Strauss, W., & Howe, N. (1991). Generations: The history of America’s future, 1584 to 2069. New York: Quill/William/Morrow.
    Upcraft, M.L., Gardner, J.N., & Barefoot, B.O. (2005). ”Challenging & supporting the first-year student: A handbook for improving the first year of college.” San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
     
  • Session Objectives
    Participants will have the opportunity to:
    Consider the potential of impacting student persistence through guiding deliberate execution and celebration of decisions made
    Begin the development and implementation advising practices and marketing communications to improve student execution on important syllabus content and decisions made in advising sessions
    Utilize an Action Plan framework and examples to draw from in transforming their Advising Syllabus into an Action Plan
    Network with colleagues for further collaboration and innovation
  • Appendix: Session Abstract
    The advising syllabus is a brilliant concept. It articulates and validates the work of academic advising as teaching. It concisely lists student responsibilities and timelines. It communicates the institution’s commitments to quality, accessibility of resources, and acknowledges the nature of partnership between the school and student. THEN WHY, in practice, does it struggle to engage and impact the academic success of the students who most need its benefits? To answer this question we will begin with and draw upon the very principles of developmental advising. We will employ adolescent psychology as we consider student expectations and their need for ownership.
    From deep in the students’ heart we will invite, prompt, and celebrate real learning, maturity, accountability, and progressive accomplishment. We will do this with the Action Plan.
  • Appendix: Session Description (1 of 2)
    Brief Outline/Description
    The advising syllabus is a well-recognized and much appreciated element of quality advising programs based in principles of teaching and learning. When utilized to its full potential, it has the ability to transform the high standards of groups like the Center for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) into a more accessible student context using language they will understand and embrace. Unfortunately, students most likely to be responsive to an instructor’s syllabus are not the same students who stand to benefit most significantly from the content of an advising syllabus.
  • Appendix: Session Description (2 of 2)
    This presentation will look at adolescent culture, student and parent expectations, and effective marketing from beyond the realm of education. The presentation will address the role of academic advisors and how, through consistent and pervasive communication of important messages, the content of a quality syllabus can be transformed and delivered as an action plan. In the context of an advising relationship, the use of the Action Plan will affirm the development of the student and encourage their ownership and ongoing pursuit of academic success. CAS Standards, current adolescent research, and literature on the topics of advising as teaching and advising syllabi will be discussed. Additionally, the presentation will offer ideas and examples as to how a public four-year university has taken steps to implement an eight-semester action plan for students with and without declared majors.