barefootjournal.com http://www.barefootjournal.com/are-bucket-lists-making-us-sick/
barefootgb
Are Bucket Lists Making Us ...
“I want to do them all by the time I’m 35,” she said.
“Why?”
The young lady thought for a moment, having not really consid...
Take time out to allow the unexpected to happen. Magic happens in the gaps, especially in travel.
In life, like travel, th...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Are Bucket Lists Making Us Sick? (The Barefoot Journal)

252

Published on

Fire Your Boss, Sell Your Car, Travel the World: The Barefoot Journal Guide to living the life less ordinary.
www.BarefootJournal.com

digital nomad, vagabond, vagabonding, travel, wanderlust, round the world, airfares, tickets, travel hacking, long term travel, location independence, entrepreneur, barefoot journal, graham brown

Published in: Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
252
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Are Bucket Lists Making Us Sick? (The Barefoot Journal)"

  1. 1. barefootjournal.com http://www.barefootjournal.com/are-bucket-lists-making-us-sick/ barefootgb Are Bucket Lists Making Us Sick? In our social media age of travel bucket lists, are we missing the point? Has travel become a point scoring exercise to impress others? Flying out of Auckland to Fiji I sat next to a young lady traveler who told us about her journey around the Polynesian islands. Coral Beach, Fiji From Fiji she’ll make her way across the islands through Tonga to the Cook Islands and then on to the Marquesas. The latter being little known islands out on the eastern arm of the Pacific. In all, she’ll make 12 stops in 20 days. She said she didn’t have enough time off work and would have to complete the other islands next year. “Sounds like quite a hard schedule,” I said a little surprised.
  2. 2. “I want to do them all by the time I’m 35,” she said. “Why?” The young lady thought for a moment, having not really considered the answer to this question, then replied, “Because it’s my bucket list” In this world of social media, bucket lists are everywhere. There are websites and apps devoted to the subject. But just because it’s common does it make it the right thing to do? Bucket lists are powerful ideas. We set ourselves a goal then go full tilt to complete that goal. My life, I guess, was once a bucket-list. “I’ll be a millionaire by 30!” I told myself (and others). I didn’t happen. “I’ll own my own company. I’ll be successful etc” I had my own bucket list of things I’d do from skydiving here to climbing up there. After some time, I found the appeal of the bucket list wear thin. I completed the items I set out to achieve and then thought “what next?” I realized that the list wasn’t lived for our own happiness but because of our fear of what others think of us. Those who live for the approval of others will also die by their rejection. Bucket lists compel us to live other people’s agendas. We build our lives in the image of what we think other people will think of us. We think other people will respect us more if we travel 30 countries by aged 30. This social pressure forces us to value quantity over quality. What happens is we become obsessed by completing the list rather than enjoying the completion. We achieve the things we wanted to achieve but we deny our happiness in achieving them. It is difficult to be so robust to the social pressures around us. We are social animals. In our social media age we surround ourselves with the lives of others. We are under constant pressure to impress. Bucket Lists are a great idea. They motivate. They help us find the energy and enthusiasm but Bucket List culture is also making us, as a society, sick. We have to be brave enough to take time out to value quality over quantity. The young lady on the plane is like many of us – compelled to complete a bucket list for the sake of others. She knows, deep down, she would have much more fun, have much more of a rewarding travel experience by visiting just one or two of those islands. She could stay for a while. Rather than rush madly around she could integrate and learn something about the culture by being part of it. When you focus on quality not quantity each experience becomes special. You discover things that aren’t supposed to happen. But then what could she share on Facebook? What would she blog about? When it comes to travel, quality time is happy time. Don’t be afraid to take it slow, to do less. Don’t feel compelled to travel everywhere, see everything because it’s “on your list”. You will blaze through your destinations and think “so what was that all about?” Rather, understand that less is more.
  3. 3. Take time out to allow the unexpected to happen. Magic happens in the gaps, especially in travel. In life, like travel, there are no prizes for doing the most or finishing first. All that matters is you did it on your own terms. Fire Your Boss, Sell Your Car, Travel The World Remember your dreams and fight for them If only closed minds came with closed mouths Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels It’s only after we’ve lost everything that we’re free to do anything When exactly were you brainwashed into believing that the best way to earn a living is to have a job? If you enjoyed this post, get more insights and Barefoot tips by clicking LIKE on The Barefoot Journal Facebook Page

×