Game MOOC
Experiential Engagement and Transformation
Barbara Truman – UCF  Academic Partnerships
Dr. Francisca Yonekura –...
Participant Objectives
• Identify potential benefits for different
stakeholders
• Gain knowledge about Game Based Learning...
Overview of the Research
within the Project
Participatory Culture
Dr. Lisa Dawley
Dr. Henry Jenkins
Dr. Clay Shirky
Game B...
Social Network Construction
Dawley
Media Convergence
Jenkins
Cognitive Surplus
Shirky
Games and Learning
Gee
Games for Change
McGonigal
Art of Game Design
Schell
Cognition & Cultural Practices
Related to Gameplay and Learning
Steinkuehler
A New Culture of Learning
Seely Brown
Gartner Hype Cycle
Social Networking
A MOOC by any other name…
cMOOC, xMOOC
cMOOC
• Connectivist MOOC
• Social networked
learning
• Gamification
• Knowledge cr...
The Game MOOC
Immersive
Second Life/Google Hangout
MMORPG and
Open Sandbox Games
Social Networking
Game MOOC Timeline
Game-Based Learning
• Use of game mechanics and game design
• Making learning more engaging
• Path to mastery via scaffold...
Engaged Learning
Scaffolding
Scientific Inquiry
Problem Solving
Leveling and Achievements
OK to Fail
Constructivism
Mashups
• Portal – http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com
• Blogs
• 3D Gamelab -
• GameMOOC Youtube
• GameMOOC Twitter #gamemooc
• Go...
Output Results
• 419 Participants
• 1704 Posts
• 129734 Visitors
• 192232 Page Views
• 419 Members
• 344 Threads
Outcomes
• PLNs and Communities of practice
– Inevitable Betrayal
– SIGVE/Game Connection
• G.A.M.E. (Gamers Advancing Mea...
Future Implications
• Shareable Resources
• Social Networking – multiple venues
• Mastery vs “seat time”
• Seamless – just...
Sign up at
• http://bit.ly/gamesmooc
• Begins March 18, 2013
• 6 weeks til April 22, 2013
• Topics include:
– Build the Ga...
Q & A
References
Lisa Dawley http://lisadawley.wordpress.com
Dawley, L. (2009). Social network knowledge construction: emerging ...
References (continued)
Jane McGonigal http://janemcgonigal.com
McGonigal, J. (2005). All Game Play is Performance: The Sta...
Thank you!
• Tanya Martin
– gridjumper2@gmail.com
– Twitter @gridjumper
– Blog Gridjumper.net
• Barbara Truman
– Email bar...
Florida EdTech Conference 2013
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Florida EdTech Conference 2013

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Presentation at FETC13 with Dr. Francisca Yonekura of the University of Central FLorida and Tanya Martin of Broward County Public School in Orlando, FL, January 2013

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  • Transforms participants into community Mashup – Facilitatied Leadership Experiential Learning
  • Front Range Community College Kae Novak, Chris Luchs Advisory Board Design Delivery Marketing Connected Educator Moving to the present the Games MOOC has been more formulated into something that has rubrics and requirements, I hate to phrase it with a certain “standard” but its reached a point where arranging and organizing events has become second nature to the Organizers. A couple of notable changes are the switch from P2PU to the shivtar portal guild site, the introduction of badges and the weekly Twitter chats/Google hangouts. Most of the major changes were from our secret Advisory Board meetings where we all sat down (in Google Hangouts) and really got down to brass tacks about what was doing well in the Games MOOC and what needed to be changed. Changing the learning management system (lms) was probably the hardest thing for all of us to admit needed to happen, but we were hesitant as well. Kae was probably thinking it was for the better though Chris hasn’t complained about it too badly, collecting quantitative data is about the same. This decision came about from having a semi-more focus on the game WoW being our prime example and being able to show Gamification and teambuilding through easier means, pretty much all the organizers have at least a level 1 or up to level 20 character on the Sisters of Elune server in the starting area for when we first start out (even going so far as to reaching the new level 90 cap). Shivtar was originally intended to be a Guild (the in-game groups/clubs in WoW) database with forum and badge capabilities through Mozilla Backback core standards, this has also expanded into the real world forming bonds with other educators such as the Inevitable Betrayal Guild on the Horde side on the aforementioned server which was formed over two years ago with people who already saw the learning potential of games before we did. After a presentation by the great James Paul Gee about gamification, the idea acted as resurgence through the educational community like wild fire. We too were looking to incorporate game design into the Games MOOC back in the P2PU rendition, but the site didn’t offer that sort of thing adding another positive chalk mark on Shivtr. Even though it was a hard decision it was made for the better as we switched to the more Game-friendly lms, Shivtr. The last major change was the rough requirement of having to attend or comment on or during the live sessions that were scheduled once or twice a week in the evenings. Back in the P2PU we met frequently in SL at Front Range to do introductions before speeding off into other programs. True, SL was a great place to meet, but more and more participants became weary (I would think) of doing the whole SL program and then going into multiple programs soon after when they were just getting situated in SL became such a task in it of itself. So we still do give that option now, but we live stream the Google Hangouts in the Diner on ISTE for those that want to, but between Youtube and Twitter the competition is clear to see which people lean to. Anyways, the weekly meetings have topics that they revolve around and most of the readings, links to other pages of interest and additional resources are located on the Shivtr site while the bulk of the discussion happens live with easily twenty or more attending. In its current episode, it’s seeing over 500 participants with an astonishing growing number of 1700 and beyond. Having regulated meetings at predictable dates and times was a must. On P2PU, it was practically a free-for-all trying to schedule meetings so multiple people could come on different days; sure it was the summer, but a line needed to be drawn. From myself going by a head first volunteer of moderating and facilitating to a reserved Advisory Board member, seeing the Games MOOC evolve and change really does make me happy to have been and to continue to be a part of something so profound as the Games MOOC no words can express my gratitude to my fellow educators who are trying to make that difference that everyone talks about but rarely follows through with it.
  • Shareable Resources Lower cost of PD Maybe a mahinima here ??
  • Use of MMORPGs in education WoW Educator Guilds Machinima in Education So between 2 iterations 419 participants and 1704 posts. Here are the full stats Total Visitors: 129734 Total Page Views: 192232 Total Members: 419 Total Shouts: 1 Total Threads: 344 Total Posts: 1704 Info on next Games MOOC
  • Shareable Resources Lower cost of PD
  • To sign-up for the third iteration of the Games MOOC, click here:. This course will begin on March 18, 2013 and run for six weeks until April 22, 2013. Our topic for Games MOOC III is Build the Game using Apps, AR and ARGs. The focus of this MOOC will be creating a game or gaming project for your course. Depending on your class, you may choose to use a little, a lot or no technology at all. This course will have us exploring all the options. This is the sign-up http://bit.ly/gamesmooc for the third iteration of the Games MOOC.This course will begin on March 18, 2013 and run for six weeks until April 22, 2013. Our topic for Games MOOC III is Build the Game using Apps, AR and ARGs. The focus of this MOOC will be creating a game or gaming project for your course.This may take the form of using mobile devices to include even augmented reality. Or it may be a highly immersive interactive project that has your students doing live action role-play. Depending on your class, you may choose to use a little, alot or no technology at all. This course will have us exploring all the options.
  • We could give Kae’s contact info if she says it is ok
  • Florida EdTech Conference 2013

    1. 1. Game MOOC Experiential Engagement and Transformation Barbara Truman – UCF  Academic Partnerships Dr. Francisca Yonekura – University of Central Florida Tanya Martin – Broward County Schools Kae Novak – Colorado Community College – Front Range
    2. 2. Participant Objectives • Identify potential benefits for different stakeholders • Gain knowledge about Game Based Learning and gamification • Choose a level of engagement in an upcoming GAME MOOC • Use leadership within an online professional development community
    3. 3. Overview of the Research within the Project Participatory Culture Dr. Lisa Dawley Dr. Henry Jenkins Dr. Clay Shirky Game Based Learning –Gamification Dr. James Gee Dr. Jane McGonigal Mr. Jesse Schell Dr. Constance Steinkuehler Dr. John Seely Brown
    4. 4. Social Network Construction Dawley
    5. 5. Media Convergence Jenkins
    6. 6. Cognitive Surplus Shirky
    7. 7. Games and Learning Gee
    8. 8. Games for Change McGonigal
    9. 9. Art of Game Design Schell
    10. 10. Cognition & Cultural Practices Related to Gameplay and Learning Steinkuehler
    11. 11. A New Culture of Learning Seely Brown
    12. 12. Gartner Hype Cycle Social Networking
    13. 13. A MOOC by any other name… cMOOC, xMOOC cMOOC • Connectivist MOOC • Social networked learning • Gamification • Knowledge creation • Crowd-sourced information xMOOC • Well funded MOOC • Traditional approach • Knowledge duplication • Prestige of expert • Access to elite institutions and content
    14. 14. The Game MOOC Immersive
    15. 15. Second Life/Google Hangout
    16. 16. MMORPG and Open Sandbox Games
    17. 17. Social Networking
    18. 18. Game MOOC Timeline
    19. 19. Game-Based Learning • Use of game mechanics and game design • Making learning more engaging • Path to mastery via scaffolding skills • Scientific Inquiry • Problem Solving • Leveling and Achievements • Failure is part of learning • Constructivist Learning
    20. 20. Engaged Learning
    21. 21. Scaffolding
    22. 22. Scientific Inquiry
    23. 23. Problem Solving
    24. 24. Leveling and Achievements
    25. 25. OK to Fail
    26. 26. Constructivism
    27. 27. Mashups • Portal – http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com • Blogs • 3D Gamelab - • GameMOOC Youtube • GameMOOC Twitter #gamemooc • Google Hangout • Flicker Game MOOC • Livebinder • WoW, Tera, Guild Wars, Minecraft, Second Life, Portal, Eve Online, Opensim
    28. 28. Output Results • 419 Participants • 1704 Posts • 129734 Visitors • 192232 Page Views • 419 Members • 344 Threads
    29. 29. Outcomes • PLNs and Communities of practice – Inevitable Betrayal – SIGVE/Game Connection • G.A.M.E. (Gamers Advancing Meaningful Educa • Youtube Channel of videos • Ongoing Tweetchats #Gamemooc • Use of new tools
    30. 30. Future Implications • Shareable Resources • Social Networking – multiple venues • Mastery vs “seat time” • Seamless – just natural learning • Global participation/collaboration • Innovate continuously • Professional networking • Lower cost of professional development
    31. 31. Sign up at • http://bit.ly/gamesmooc • Begins March 18, 2013 • 6 weeks til April 22, 2013 • Topics include: – Build the Game using Apps – AR and ARGs
    32. 32. Q & A
    33. 33. References Lisa Dawley http://lisadawley.wordpress.com Dawley, L. (2009). Social network knowledge construction: emerging virtual world pedagogyOn the Horizon (Vol. 17, pp. 109 - 121): Emerald Group Publishing Limited. doi: 10.1108/10748120910965494 Henry Jenkins http://henryjenkins.org Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: where old and new media collide: New York University Press. Jenkins, H. (2006). Fans, bloggers, and gamers: exploring participatory culture: New York University Press. Jenkins, H. (2007). The wow climax: Tracing the emotional impact of popular culture. New York, NY New York University Press. Clay Shirky http://www.shirky.com/ Shirky, C. (2008). Here comes everybody: the power of organizing without organizations. New York: Penguin Press. Shirky, C. (2010). Cognitive surplus: creativity and generosity in a connected age. New York: Penguin Press. James Paul Gee http://www.jamespaulgee.com Gee, J. P. (2007). Good video games. New York, NY: Peter Lang. Gee, J. P. (2004). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Gee, J. (2008). Video Games and Embodiment. Games and Culture, 3(3-4), 253-263. doi: citeulike-article-id:3882509 Gee, J. (2008). A sociocultural perspective on opportunity to learn. Assessment, equity, and opportunity to learn, 76–108. (available online http://www.jamespaulgee.com/node/31 Gee, J. (2008). Video Games and Embodiment. Games and Culture, 3(3-4), 253-263. doi: citeulike-article-id:3882509 Gee, J. P. (2009). Digital Media and Learning as an Emerging Field, Part I: How We Got Here. International Journal of Learning and Media, 1(2), 13-23. doi: 10.1162/ijlm.2009.0011 Gee, J. P. (2009). Digital Media and Learning as an Emerging Field, Part I: How We Got Here. International Journal of Learning and Media, 1(2), 13-23. doi: 10.1162/ijlm.2009.0011 Gee, J. P. (2010). New Digital Media and Learning as an Emerging Area and "Worked Examples" as One Way Forward: The MIT Press.
    34. 34. References (continued) Jane McGonigal http://janemcgonigal.com McGonigal, J. (2005). All Game Play is Performance: The State of the Art Game. McGonigal, J. E. (2006). This might be a game: ubiquitous play and performance at the turn of the twenty-first century. Available from http://worldcat.org /z-wcorg/ database. McGonigal, J. (2008). Engagement economy: The future of massively scaled collaboration and participation (Report no. 1183). Palo Alto, CA: Institute for the Future. McGonigal, J. (2008). Engagement economy: The future of massively scaled collaboration and participation (Report no. 1183). Palo Alto, CA: Institute for the Future. Jesse Schell http://janemcgonigal.com Schell, J. (2008). The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses: Elsevier/Morgan Kaufmann. Constance Steinkuehler http://constances.org Steinkuehler, C. A. (2005). Cognition and learning in massively multiplayer online games: A critical approach. The University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI. Steinkuehler, C., & Chmiel, M. (2006). Fostering scientific habits of mind in the context of online play. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Learning sciences, Bloomington, Indiana. Steinkuehler, C. (2006). Massively Multiplayer Online Video Gaming as Participation in a Discourse. Mind, Culture & Activity, 13(1), 38-52. doi: citeulike-article-id:1121789 Steinkuehler, C., & Williams, D. (2006). Where Everybody Knows Your (Screen) Name: Online Games as "Third Places". Journal of Computer- Mediated Communication, 11(4). doi: citeulike-article-id:825426 Steinkuehler, C. (2010). Video Games and Digital Literacies. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(1), 61-63. John Seely Brown http://www.johnseelybrown.com John Hagel, III, Brown, J. S., & Davison, L. (2012). The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion: Basic Books. Thomas, D., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change: CreateSpace.
    35. 35. Thank you! • Tanya Martin – gridjumper2@gmail.com – Twitter @gridjumper – Blog Gridjumper.net • Barbara Truman – Email barbara.truman@gmail.com – Twitter @barbaratruman • Dr. Francisca Yonekura – E-mail francisca@ucf.edu – Twitter @frankiey
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