OSS Model, Lifecycle &    Development        PRESENTED BY  SHAFIUL AZAM CHOWDHURY     STUDENT, CSE, BUET
Contents Open Source defined   Pros & Cons of Open Source Software (OOS)   OOS in developing countries Open Source Pro...
OOS Defined refers to software whose licenses give users 4 essential freedoms:    to run the program for any purpose,  ...
“Traditional Software Development” – problems? Prone to time and cost overruns Largely unmaintainable Questionable qual...
OOS: Pros Collaborative, parallel development involving    source code sharing and reuse    constant feedback and peer r...
User involvement in OOS Users: valued assets, treated as co-developers leads to code improvement and effective  debuggin...
Motivation towards OOSD? No payment, then reasons for participation in open  source ? Projects range from    Challenge ...
OOS: Cons! Absence of formal management structures: slow progress.   “large, semi-organized mob with a fuzzy vision” In...
OOS for Developing Countries Governments everywhere encourage the use of  OSS: motivated by savings in cost Potential de...
Open Source Project   LIFECYCLE
Stages & Variables Typical PLC stages:   Introduction   Growth   Maturity   Decline / Revive Project Life Cycle Grap...
Open Source Project Life Cycle
Stages of Open Source PLC Introduction: initial motivation for a project to  develop a software application     produce ...
Stages of Open Source PLC Maturity: the project approaches critical mass.    number of users and developers grows to a m...
Graphical Example
OSS Development ModelsIN THE FOLLOWING SLIDE AN OOSD MODEL(PROPOSED BY ROETS, MINNAAR, WRIGHT)            IS REFLECTED
Proposed OOSD Model
OOSD Model Phases Initiation   Developed code/ initial version - used as a prototype for    further progress. Review-co...
OOSD Model Phases (contd‟) Debugging-reincorporation cycle   within the community web space   No formal planned debuggi...
References ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF OPEN  SOURCE PROJECTS: A LIFE CYCLE APPROACH  by Donald E. Wynn, Jr. OPEN SOURCE:...
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Oss model, lifecycle & development

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Open Source Software Model, Lifecycle & Development

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Oss model, lifecycle & development

  1. 1. OSS Model, Lifecycle & Development PRESENTED BY SHAFIUL AZAM CHOWDHURY STUDENT, CSE, BUET
  2. 2. Contents Open Source defined  Pros & Cons of Open Source Software (OOS)  OOS in developing countries Open Source Project Lifecycle A Proposed OOS Development Model
  3. 3. OOS Defined refers to software whose licenses give users 4 essential freedoms:  to run the program for any purpose,  to study the workings of the program, and modify the program to suit specific needs,  to redistribute copies of the program at no charge or for a fee, and  to improve the program, and release the improved, modified version. OSS users do not pay royalties as no copyright exists, in contrast to proprietary software.
  4. 4. “Traditional Software Development” – problems? Prone to time and cost overruns Largely unmaintainable Questionable quality and reliability Lack of user involvement: touted as contributing to project failure Shortfalls in skilled personnel: Team members with insufficient technical expertise price of license fees for software and tools required 75% of software projects fail in one or more of these measures.
  5. 5. OOS: Pros Collaborative, parallel development involving source code sharing and reuse constant feedback and peer review Large pool of globally dispersed, highly talented, motivated professionals: quality product Users are viewed as co-developers rapid release times OSS can be tested without cost: no license fee loosely centralized, cooperative community
  6. 6. User involvement in OOS Users: valued assets, treated as co-developers leads to code improvement and effective debugging users assist developers in finding system faults and improvements:  reducing the need & cost for extra developers.
  7. 7. Motivation towards OOSD? No payment, then reasons for participation in open source ? Projects range from  Challenge  improving skills, to altruism and fun  financial reward
  8. 8. OOS: Cons! Absence of formal management structures: slow progress.  “large, semi-organized mob with a fuzzy vision” Involving users closely can become problematic: tend to create bureaucracies Meritocratic, ego-driven community: possible feature creep  Programmer credibility > “keeping it simple”? Rapid releases: more iterations than commercial software: management problem  new release needs to be implemented  informal requirements analysis: problematic. What to include in newer version? „code-centric‟, targeted mainly at high-end power users. Less attention on potential “non-technical” audience! confusion surrounding licensing models
  9. 9. OOS for Developing Countries Governments everywhere encourage the use of OSS: motivated by savings in cost Potential development of a local software industry  internationalization of software is a by-product. Governments and organizations stops worrying about piracy Results in new business ventures  Poor user-interface: opens business opportunity! Improvement in skill shortage in developing countries.
  10. 10. Open Source Project LIFECYCLE
  11. 11. Stages & Variables Typical PLC stages:  Introduction  Growth  Maturity  Decline / Revive Project Life Cycle Graph  Independent variable: Time  Dependent variable: Sales / Profit / Downloads
  12. 12. Open Source Project Life Cycle
  13. 13. Stages of Open Source PLC Introduction: initial motivation for a project to develop a software application  produce a working version of the software  sell the vision for the organization Growth: more users become aware of its existence.  more feedback from the users regarding feature requests, bugs, support requests, etc.  Administration gives more focus on quality and sufficiency.
  14. 14. Stages of Open Source PLC Maturity: the project approaches critical mass.  number of users and developers grows to a maximum size  admins are involved in a significant amount of time enforcing policies, evaluating others‟ code, and other non-development functions  Increases levels of delegation to the community members  code becomes large enough to warrant multiple versions and releases Decline (or Revival)  users find other solutions to their products, developers lose interest  revival of the project community in response to a new release/environmental or market change/motivated developers  new growth or maturity stage 
  15. 15. Graphical Example
  16. 16. OSS Development ModelsIN THE FOLLOWING SLIDE AN OOSD MODEL(PROPOSED BY ROETS, MINNAAR, WRIGHT) IS REFLECTED
  17. 17. Proposed OOSD Model
  18. 18. OOSD Model Phases Initiation  Developed code/ initial version - used as a prototype for further progress. Review-contribution cycle  Independent peer review  Prompt feedback pre-commit testing  Launched once code is considered adequate for release  Ensures new code does not break existing release  Faulty code hampers project reputation
  19. 19. OOSD Model Phases (contd‟) Debugging-reincorporation cycle  within the community web space  No formal planned debugging: individuals volunteers  The more people that seek, find and remove bugs, the better the quality of the software Production release  take the form of a prototype that can be used in the initiation phase of the next iteration of that project
  20. 20. References ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF OPEN SOURCE PROJECTS: A LIFE CYCLE APPROACH by Donald E. Wynn, Jr. OPEN SOURCE: TOWARDS SUCCESSFUL SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES by Rinette Roets, MaryLou Minnaar & Kerry Wright The Internet  Presentation prepared by: Shafiul Azam Chowdhury, Student of Dept. of CSE, BUET
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