Gamification - Defining, Designing and Using it

  • 7,314 views
Uploaded on

A presentation that describes the concept of gamification, it's roots, design and application. Minimal words, lots of pics and lots of fun to present. :) …

A presentation that describes the concept of gamification, it's roots, design and application. Minimal words, lots of pics and lots of fun to present. :)

Make sure to sign up to my weekly gamification newsletter: http://gamificationweekly.com

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
7,314
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10

Actions

Shares
Downloads
234
Comments
6
Likes
11

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Gamification - defining, designing and using itZachary Fitz-WalterMobile Innovation Lab, QUThttp://www.flickr.com/people/8473570@N02http://zefcan.com
  • 2. Today’s missions >>1. What is gamification?2. Designing gamification
  • 3. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ramblingtraveler/3544734138/Let’s say you caught the train this morning towork...
  • 4. http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/5463240793/...and you know you should take the stairs,but the escalator is just so much easier.
  • 5. How can we encourage people to take thestairs and get a little more exercise?
  • 6. Odenplan, Stockholm, Swedenhttp://www.thefuntheory.com/piano-staircaseHere’s an interesting idea...
  • 7. Piano Stairshttp://www.thefuntheory.com/piano-staircaseTurn them into a piano?
  • 8. Using play to motivatehttp://www.thefuntheory.com/piano-staircase
  • 9. Gamificationhttp://www.thefuntheory.com/piano-staircaseGamification is similar...
  • 10. Gamificationhttp://www.forbes.com/sites/danieltack/2013/01/02/world-of-warcraft-gearing-up-at-level-90...but it draws more specifically on videogames rather than just play.
  • 11. 1. What is gamification?
  • 12. Gamification is a special word
  • 13. It hasn’t been around for very long...
  • 14. 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013Web search interest in gamificationtrends.google.com
  • 15. Foursquare really took off in 2011...
  • 16. Text...and was well known for the gameelements it added
  • 17. “By 2015, More than 50 percent of organizations thatmanage innovation processes will gamify those processes”Gartner Press Release - 2011http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1629214Gartner released this statement in 2011
  • 18. Gamification became a buzzword
  • 19. http://www.bogost.com/blog/gamification_is_bullshit.shtmlAnd it’s made a bit of a name for itself bothgood... and not so good.
  • 20. http://www.flickr.com/people/14516334@N00It’s become a bit of a cure all forengagement problems...
  • 21. “80 Percent of Current Gamified Applications Will Fail toMeet Business Objectives Primarily Due to Poor Design”Gartner Press Release - 2012http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2251015And then Gartner released this statement...
  • 22. http://www.redherring.com/internet/gamification-platform-badgeville-raises-25m/Yet still there is a lot of money in it...
  • 23. Mixed Messages?
  • 24. GamificationTo understand it...
  • 25. Games...we have to go back to it’s roots.
  • 26. http://laportecreative.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/nerdyrevenge.jpgThe average gamer?Is a young, nerdy male who plays videogames (often violent) all by themselves right?
  • 27. Not really...
  • 28. Video games have become mainstream
  • 29. 92% of Australians live in a household withat least one device used for playing gamesInteractive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/DA12FinalLinkVideo.pdf
  • 30. The average age of a gamer is 32Interactive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/DA12FinalLinkVideo.pdf(And 43% of people aged 51 or older are also gamers)
  • 31. Genderof Australian gamers53%Male47%FemaleInteractive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/DA12FinalLinkVideo.pdf
  • 32. Video games have become big business
  • 33. The video game industry in Australianetted $1.161 billion in revenue last yearInteractive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net
  • 34. In the US consumers spent $24.75 billion onvideo games, hardware and accessories in 2011.Entertainment Software Association, 2011 - http://www.theesa.com/facts/index.aspThe Numbers, 2011 - http://www.the-numbers.com/market/
  • 35. Video games have become mobile
  • 36. Mobile phones are used to play games in 43%of game households, tablet computers in 13%Interactive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/DA12FinalLinkVideo.pdf
  • 37. Video games have become social
  • 38. 1 in 5 gamers play social network games1 in 10 play massively multiplayer gamesInteractive Games & Entertainment Association, 2012http://www.igea.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/DA12FinalLinkVideo.pdf
  • 39. Games are incredibly engaging
  • 40. World of WarcraftOne of the most engaging games out thereis this one.
  • 41. You create a character...
  • 42. ...and then embark on quests andadventures in the world with other players.
  • 43. You get quests.
  • 44. Kill 3 boarsLike this one.
  • 45. You go off and complete them.
  • 46. And then get a reward.
  • 47. Wait... this is just like workAfter playing for 8 hours straight it hit me...
  • 48. But it was really fun work
  • 49. 12 million subscribers in 2010Others think it’s fun as well, even many yearsafter it was released.
  • 50. So what is a game?
  • 51. Most games boil down to solving a problem...
  • 52. • Find a way to kill 3 boars• Find a way to get more points than the otherteam• Find a way to get to the finish line before theother players• Find a way to complete this level• Find a way to destroy the other player beforethey destroy youLast four examples are from The Art of Game Design, Jesse Schell, 2008
  • 53. It’s how this activity is presented that plays animportant part in creating a fun experience
  • 54. "Fun from games arises out of mastery. It arises out ofcomprehension. It is the act of solving puzzles that makesgames fun. In other words, with games, learning is the drug”- Raph KosterA Theory of Fun, 2005
  • 55. Hang on, if games are so engaging...
  • 56. ...could we use them to make otherthings engaging?
  • 57. GamificationNow we’re seeing where this concept ofgamification comes from...
  • 58. Serious games...but wait, the concept of serious games hasbeen around long before gamification.
  • 59. http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/photos/uncategorized/2009/02/09/oregontrail.jpgOregon Trail - 1971
  • 60. http://www.whatisthe2gs.apple2.org.za/files/ReaderRabbit/ScreenGrab_1/reader_rabbit_shot.gifReader Rabbit - 1986
  • 61. Where in the World is Carmen Sandiegohttp://www.abandonia.com/games/13
  • 62. Why gamification? Why now?
  • 63. First, video games have become reallypopular...
  • 64. ...and second there has been a change intechnology like no other. In particular mobiledevices, constant connection and sensors.
  • 65. With our powers combined...The world is our playground
  • 66. Gamification
  • 67. Framing real life activities like a video game, in order tomake these activities more engagingGamification
  • 68. Sustainability - Nissan My LeafSustainability Nissan CARWINGS
  • 69. Sustainability - Nissan My LeafSustainability Nissan CARWINGS
  • 70. Exercise Nike+
  • 71. Exercise Nike+
  • 72. Lifestyle Health Month
  • 73. Lifestyle Health Month
  • 74. Education Khan Academy
  • 75. Education Khan Academy
  • 76. Finance Mint
  • 77. Finance Mint
  • 78. Productivity Epic Win
  • 79. Google GlassIf technology continues to evolve...http://pctechmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/google-glasses.jpeg
  • 80. Eran May-raz and Daniel Lazo, 2012, https://vimeo.com/46304267
  • 81. But can it actually work?
  • 82. 2. Designing Gamification
  • 83. Gamification Blueprint
  • 84. •Points•Badges•Leaderboards•Levels
  • 85. Became popular with Foursquare
  • 86. •Points•Badges•Leaderboards•Levels
  • 87. •Points•Badges•Leaderboards•Levels= Rewards}
  • 88. Behaviour + Rewards = Fun!
  • 89. Behaviour + Rewards = Fun!Behaviour + Rewards = Fun!
  • 90. progresswars.comOtherwise this would be the best game outthere...
  • 91. So what’s missing?
  • 92. "Fun from games arises out of mastery. It arises out ofcomprehension. It is the act of solving puzzles that makesgames fun. In other words, with games, learning is the drug”- Raph KosterA Theory of Fun, 2005
  • 93. Where’s the puzzle? Where’s the challenge?
  • 94. So how can we design engaginggamification experiences?
  • 95. MotivationThere are two types...
  • 96. Extrinsic Motivationhttp://2bgr8stock.deviantart.com/art/Money-Cash-113445826Motivation for an external reward
  • 97. Behaviour + Rewards =ExtrinsicMotivation
  • 98. Intrinsic MotivationTim Pierce http://www.flickr.com/photos/48439369@N00When an activity is performed for the internalsatisfaction of under the activity itself
  • 99. Intrinsic Motivationhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/allisonjohnstonn/6332963681/The act of playing a game is generallyconsidered an intrinsically satisfying activity
  • 100. So what makes a gamemotivating to play?
  • 101. • Autonomy - choice to play and choice overactions• Competence - ability to optimally challengeplayers• Relatedness - connection with others(Ryan, Rigby, and Przybylski, 2006)http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11031-006-9051-8
  • 102. Flowhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/allisonjohnstonn/6332963681/Proposed by Csíkszentmihályi
  • 103. • Intense and focused concentration• Merging of action and awareness• A loss of reflective self-consciousness• A sense control or agency over the activity• A distortion of time• Experience of the activity as being intrinsicallyrewardingNakamura, J., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2009). Flow theory and research. In C. R. Snyder & S. J.Lopez (Eds.), Handbook of positive psychology (pp. 195-206). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Factors of a flow experience
  • 104. • A clear goal• Clear progress• Clear and immediate feedback• Balance of challenge and skillConditions for flow
  • 105. Based off a graph proposed by Csíkszentmihályi
  • 106. These are important factors to considerwhen trying to design a game.
  • 107. These are important factors to considerwhen trying to design gamification.
  • 108. Designing gamification
  • 109. Start with an activityhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/hoteldelapaixgeneve/5726470040/
  • 110. Ask, do you really need gamification?
  • 111. • Have you got an engagement or motivationproblem, or is it something else? E.g., Usability• Ask yourself is this a problem that can’t beimproved in any other way?• If motivation is lacking... looking towards gameelements and theory might be worthwhile.
  • 112. Ask why is this activity boring?What’s missing?
  • 113. • Clear and interesting goals?• Feedback?• Interesting and playful mechanics?• Challenge?• Progression and Mastery?
  • 114. Determine the goalsThe goals of the activity you’re trying toencourage (e.g., getting fit)
  • 115. Derive goal metricsWork out how you can measure these goals
  • 116. Sensors?http://www.wired.com/reviews/2012/10/fitbit-zip/
  • 117. Peoplehttp://gamingtheclassroom.wordpress.com/syllabus/
  • 118. Design the gamification
  • 119. Design like a gamehttp://www.flickr.com/people/8473570@N02
  • 120. Think of the playerhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/allisonjohnstonn/6332963681/What are their demographics? What do theylike playing?
  • 121. http://bizfest.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/bartle.png
  • 122. Test and playtest!http://www.flickr.com/people/8473570@N02
  • 123. Dangers of Gamification
  • 124. Games get boringWhat happens after your user gets bored ofthe gamification? Will they keep using it?
  • 125. Cheatinghttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cheating.JPGPeople cheat, it’s a challenge. How willcheating affect your underlying activity?
  • 126. Cheatinghttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cheating.JPG
  • 127. Real life dangershttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ellenm1/6050529448/In games you get many lives... however inreal life you only get one. Gamify carefully.
  • 128. A good example...
  • 129. • Clear and interesting goals• Feedback• Interesting and playful mechanics• Challenge• Progression and Mastery• Aesthetics and Narrative•Handles potential dangersBillie Weiss, Original uploader Rschuman at en.wikipedia http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zombie_Chase.jpg
  • 130. Wrapping it all up
  • 131. Gamification is more than just badges
  • 132. Design it like a good game
  • 133. It’s easy, so start trying it!
  • 134. •Name: Zac Fitz-Walter•Class: PhD Candidate from QUT•Abilities: Research, Teaching, iPhone Development•Weaknesses: Cats and Mangoes<Replay?>Zac Fitz-Walter•Email: z.fitz-walter@qut.edu.au•www: http://zefcan.com•Newsletter: http://gamificationweekly.com•Twitter: @zefcan