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Scholastic Journalism Midwinter Meeting 2014

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Preliminary Report on Assessment of Scholastic Journalism Research. Report shared as part of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) 2014 Midwinter Meeting in …

Preliminary Report on Assessment of Scholastic Journalism Research. Report shared as part of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) 2014 Midwinter Meeting in Nashville, Tenn.

Published in Education , News & Politics
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  • 1. Using Mary Arnold’s Method Goal: Develop a “scaffold for past, present and future research” “Mapping the Territory: A Conceptual Model of Scholastic Journalism” presented in August 1990 Analyzed AEJMC Secondary Education Division research, teaching, and issues sessions for the year 1977-1989 Utilized category scheme from Captive Voices Derived list of 182 primary/secondary subject headings for a newsletter indexing program Compared topical concerns to 37 master’s theses and doctoral dissertations in Journalism Abstracts
  • 2. Proposed Conceptual Model of Scholastic Journalism (Arnold, 1990) Laws & Ethics History Cultural Diversity Technology Economics Media Content Pedagogy SUPPORT Schools & Community Colleges & Universities Established Media Scholastic Journalism Organizations SCHOLASTIC JOURNALISM
  • 3. Scholastic Journalism Division Papers Presented 2013 Washington, DC 2012 Chicago 2011 St. Louis, Mo. 2010 Denver, Colo. 2009 Boston, Mass. 2008 Chicago 2007 Washington, DC 2006 San Francisco, Calif. 2005 San Antonio, Tex. Papers Presented 2004 Toronto, Ontario 2003 Kansas City, Mo. 2002 Miami Beach, Fla. 2001 Washington, DC 2000 Phoenix, Ariz 1999 New Orleans 1998 Baltimore, Md 1997 Chicago 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20
  • 4. Topics of Research Papers              Censorship, Law and Ethics Non-high school pedagogy Role of journalism in the high school Other Established media (i.e. local newspaper) Journalism as Career Education Electronic Media-Technology Minority Participation High school & Univ. Intersection Media literacy Staff organization and management Verbal content (of student outlet) Scholastic journalism organizations 35 30 23 22 10 9 7 5 4 4 2 1 1 _____ TOTAL PAPERS PRESENTED (1997-2013) 153 
  • 5. Scholastic Journalism POWER PRESENTERS At least EIGHT scholars have presented FOUR or more papers during the 17-year period Bruce Plopper 7 Bruce Konkle 6 Kim Bissell 4 Steve Collins 4 Vincent Filak 9 Adam Maksl 7 Genelle Belmas 4 Julie Dodd 6
  • 6. Outside of AEJMC, WHERE ARE THE OUTLETS FOR SCHOLASTIC JOURNALISM RESEARCH & PUBLICATIONS TODAY?