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Sc10 nov16th-flex res-presentation

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Nov 16th, 2010

Nov 16th, 2010

flexible reservations

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Sc10 nov16th-flex res-presentation Sc10 nov16th-flex res-presentation Presentation Transcript

  • A Flexible Reservation Algorithm for Advance Network Provisioning Mehmet Balman , Evangelos Chaniotakis, Arie Shoshani, Alex Sim Scientific Data Management Research Group (SDM) Energy Sciences Network (ESNet) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory SC10 November 2010, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
  • Introduction Next generation research networks such as ESNet (Energy Sciences Network) provide high-speed on- demand data access between collaborating institutions by delivering network-as-a-service Currently, reservation systems (i.e. OSCARS) provides yes/no answers to a reservation request for (bandwidth, start_time, end_time) We present a novel approach to improve advance network reservation system by presenting to the clients, the possible reservation options and alternatives for earliest completion time and shortest transfer duration.
  • Motivation • We are in a new era that offers new oppurtunities to conduct scientific research with the help of computation • Computational intensive science: particle physics, climate modelling, bio-informatics simulations• Scientific simulations and experimental facilities generate massive data sets • Climate modelling data • 35 terabytes shared by more then 2500 users worldwide, • Next generation archive will be more than 650 terabytes • Large Hadron Collider • Expected to generate 100gigabits per second Scientific applications are becoming more data-intensive (dealing with petabytes of data) •
  • MotivationLarge scale application necessitate collaborations  Data need to be transferred to remote sites for further analysis (validate with simulations)  Need on demand high speed data access between collaborating parties  High performance visualization  Large volume data analysis  Need coordination and management of resourcesComplex middleware is required to manage the end- to-end distribution of data
  • ESNet (Energy Sciences Network) Provides high bandwidth network interconnect between more than 40 sites Connecting experimental facilities, supercomputing centers and thousands DOE scientists Delivering network as a service (OSCARS)  Predictable performance  Efficient resource utilization  Guaranteed bandwidth
  • On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) Conducts a QoS path for guaranteed bandwidth End-to-end provisioning between multiple domains Guaranteed bandwidth (at certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time)  OSCARS components include reservation manager, Bandwidth scheduler, and path setup system  Needs to have information about current and future states of the networkMaking a reservation → need to ensure availability of the requested bandwidth from source to destination for the requested time interval
  • Revervation RequestFor every new reservation request R={ nsource, ndestination, Mbandwidth, tstart, tend}. committed reservations between tstart and tend are examined a snapshot graph G of the network topology is generated by extracting available bandwidth information for each port in the time period (tstart, tend) The shortest path from source to destination is calculated based on the engineering metric on each link, and a bandwidth guaranteed path is set up to commit and eventually complete the reservation request for the given time period
  • Network Reservation / Topology Components (Graph): node (router), port, link (connecting two ports) engineering metric (~latency) maximum bandwidth (capacity) A 1000Mbps Reservation: 800Mbps  source, destination, path, time B C 300Mbps 900Mbps 500Mbps  (time t1, t3) A -> B -> D (900Mbps)  (time t2, t3) A -> C -> D (400Mbps) D  (time t4, t5) A -> B -> D (800Mpbs) Reservation 1 t1 Reservation 2 t4 t5 t2 t3 Reservation 3
  • Network Reservation / Example(time t1, t2) : AA to D (600Mbps) no 800 Mbps / 0Mbps (800Mbps) 100 Mbps / 900Mbps (1000Mbps)A to D (500Mbps) yes 300 Mbps / 0 Mbps (300Mbps) B C 0 Mbps / 900Mbps (900Mbps) 500 Mbps / 0Mbps (500Mbps) DActive reservationreservation 1: (time t1, t3) A -> B -> D (900Mbps)reservation 2: (time t2, t3) A -> C -> D (400Mbps)reservation 3: (time t4, t5) A -> B -> D (800Mpbs)
  • Network Reservation / Example(time t1, t3) : AA to D (500Mbps) no 400 Mbps / 400Mbps (800Mbps) 100 Mbps / 900Mbps (1000Mbps)A to C (500Mbps) no(no splitting – not max-flow) 300 Mbps / 0 Mbps (300Mbps) B C 0 Mbps / 900Mbps (900Mbps) 100 Mbps / 400Mbps (500Mbps) DActive reservationreservation 1: (time t1, t3) A -> B -> D (900Mbps)reservation 2: (time t2, t3) A -> C -> D (400Mbps)reservation 3: (time t4, t5) A -> B -> D (800Mpbs)
  • Problemif the requested bandwidth can not be guaranteed: Try-and-error until get an available reservation  Client is not given other possible options  Does not provide an optimal choice for client  May cause ineffective use of overall system  Overload system with trial-and-error attempts  End-to-end High Performance Data Movement  Bandwidth network reservation  Bandwidth provisioning in client sites  Storage allocation How can we enhance the OSCARS reservation system? • Submit constraints and the system suggests possible reservations satisfying requirements
  • Alternative Approach / Flexible Reservation Users provide maximum bandwidth they can use, total size of the data requested to be transferred, the earliest start time, and the latest completion time Users can set criteria such that they would like to reserve a path for earliest completion time or reserve a path for shortest transfer duration. Rs={ nsource , ndestination, MMAXbandwidth, DdataSize, tEarliestStart, tLatestEnd}. The reservation engine finds out the reservation R={ nsource, ndestination, Mbandwidth, tstart, tend} for the earliest completion or for the shortest duration where Mbandwidth≤ MMAXbandwidth and tEarliestStart ≤ tstart < tend≤ tLatestEnd .
  • Time-dependent Graphs We deal with a dynamic network such that the bandwidth value for every link is time dependent The most common approach is the discrete-time algorithms in which the time is modeled as a set of discrete values and a static graph is constructed for every time interval.Flexible Reservation Service – Source / destination end-points – Maximum bandwidth that can be used (provisioning in clients) – Amount of data requested to be transferred (Volume) – Earliest start time – Latest completion time – Criteria – reserve a path for earliest completion, – reserve a path shortest transfer duration
  • Max Bandwidth The maximum bandwidth available for allocation from a source node to a destination nodeModified version of Kruskal and Dijstras algorithms » Shortest path, » Min-cost path » Minimum spanning tree Bottleneck constraint » Max bandwidth path (max-bandwith)  Ex: QoS Constraint is additive in shortest path
  • Path Finding A A B C 1000Mbps/ 800Mbps / eng metric 10 eng metric 20 B D D C B 300Mbps / C eng metric 20 900Mbps/eng metric 30 500Mbps / D D eng metric 100 D (2) A (1) A (3) A 800 00 10 300 B C B C B C 90 0 D D Visit B D Visit A C (parent A) 800/20/1 hop B (parent A) 1000/10/ 1hop D (parent B) 900/30/2 hops Visit D C (parent A) 800/20/1 hop Max bandwidth from A to D is 900
  • Example Problem A vehicle travelling from city A to city B There are multiple cities between A and B connected with separate highways. Each highway has a specific speed limit – (maximum bandwidth) But we need to reduce our speed if there is high traffic load on the road We know the load on each highway for every time period – (active reservations) The first question is which path the vehicle should follow in order to reach city B from city A as early as possible? Or, we can delay our journey and start later if the total travel time would be reduced. Thus, the second question is to find the route along with the starting time for shortest travel duration.
  • Challange But, we are dealing with bandwidth reservation where allocation should be set in advance when a request is received. We have to set the speed limit before starting and cannot change that during the journey  Advance Bandwitdth Reservation Therefore, known time-dependent graph algorithms do not fit into our problem domain.
  • ApproachWe discretize the time-dependent dynamic network topology by dividing the search interval into time steps.Each time step represents a stable status of the topology.A time window is subsequent combinations of time steps. Search interval is divided into time windows  Obtain a snaphots of the network topology each time windows  The algorithm should be fast and scalable. – Searching the given time interval is accomplished in polynomial time. – Number of time windows is bounded by the number of active reservations
  • Time stepsReservation 1: (time t1, t6) A -> B -> D A (900Mbps) 1000Mbps 800MbpsReservation 2: (time t4, t7) A -> C -> D B C (400Mbps) 300MbpsReservation 3: (time t9, t12) A -> B -> D 900Mbps 500Mbps (700Mpbs) D t1 t2 t3 t4 t5 t6 t7 t8 t9 t10 t11 t12 t13 Reservation 1 Reservation 2 Reservation 3
  • Time steps  Time steps between t1 and t13 Max (2r+1) time steps, where r is the number of reservations t1 t2 t3 t4 t5 t6 t7 t8 t9 t10 t11 t12 t13time Reservation 1 Reservation 2 Reservation 3time steps Res Res 1 Res 1,2 Res 3 2 t1 t4 t6 t7 t9 t12 t13 time ts1 ts2 ts3 ts4
  • Static Graphs Res Res 1 Res 1,2 2 t4 t6 t7 t7 t9 t1 t4 t6 A A A A 800 Mbps 400 Mbps 400 Mbps 800 Mbps100 Mbps 100 Mbps 1000 Mbps 1000 Mbps 300 Mbps) 300 Mbps) 300 Mbps) 300 Mbps) B C B C B C B C 0 Mbps 500 Mbps 0 Mbps 100 Mbps 900 Mbps 100 Mbps 900 Mbps 500 Mbps D D D D G(ts1) G(ts2) G(ts3) G(ts4)
  • Time Windows Max (s × (s + 1))/2 time windows, where s is the number of time steps Res 1,2 Res 2 t6 t9 t1 t6 tw=ts3+ts4 A Atw=ts1+ts2 400 Mbps 400 Mbps 100 Mbps 1000 Mbps 300 Mbps 300 Mbps B C B C Bottleneck constraint 0 Mbps 100 Mbps 900 Mbps 100 Mbps D D G(tw)=G(ts1) x G(ts2) G(tw)=G(ts3) x G(ts4)
  • Search Time Windows• Search through these time windows in a sequential order to check whether we can satisfy the requested allocation for that time window.• First, check the duration of the time window – Can we satisfy the user request in that time windows? (we know the max bandwidth user can support)• Then, calculate the max bandwidth available in the time window
  • Performancemax-bandwidth path ~ O(n^2 ) n is the number of nodes in the topology graphIn the worst-case, we may require to search all timewindows, (s × (s + 1))/2, where s is the number oftime steps.If there are r committed reservations in the searchperiod, there can be a maximum of 2r + 1 differenttime steps in the worst-case.Overall, the worst-case complexity is boundedby O(r^2 n^2 )Note: r is relatively very small compared to the numberof nodes n
  • Example A Reservation 1: (time t1, t6) A -> B -> D 1000Mbps 800Mbps (900Mbps) Reservation 2: (time t4, t7) A -> C -> D B C 300Mbps (400Mbps) 900Mbps 500Mbps Reservation 3: (time t9, t12) A -> B -> D (700Mpbs) D t1 t2 t3 t4 t5 t6 t7 t8 t9 t10 t11 t12 t13 Reservation 1 Reservation 2 Reservation 3from A to D (earliest completion) max bandwidth = 200Mbps, volume = 200Mbps x 4 time slots earliest start = t1, latest finish t13
  • Search Order - Time Windowstime Res Res 1 Res 1,2 Res 3windows 2 t1 t4 t6 t7 t9 t12 t13 Max bandwidth from A to D t1--t4 Res 1 1. 900Mbps (3) t4—t6 Res 1, 2 2. 100Mbps (2) Res 1, 2 3. 100Mbps (5) t1--t6 t6—t7 4. 900Mbps (1) 2 5. 100Mbps (3) t4—t7 Res 1,2 6. 100Mbps (6) t1—t7 Res 1, 2 7. 900Mpbs (2) t7—t9 8. 900Mbps (3) t6—t9 Res 2 9. 100Mbps (5) t4—t9 Res 1, 2 10. 100Mbps (8) t1—t9 Res 1, 2 Reservation: ( A to D ) (100Mbps) start=t1 end=t9
  • Search Order - Time WindowsShortest duration? time Res Res 1 Res 1,2 2 Res 3 windows t1 t4 t6 t7 t9 t12 t13 Max bandwidth from A to D t9—t12 Res 3 1. 200Mbps (3) t12—t12 2. 900Mbps (1) t9—t13 3. 200Mbps (4) Res 3 Reservation: (A to D ) (200Mbps) start=t9 end=t13from A to D, max bandwidth = 200Mbps volume = 175Mbps x 4 time slots earliest start = t1, latest finish t13 earliest completion: ( A to D ) (100Mbps) start=t1 end=t8 shortest duration: ( A to D ) (200Mbps) start=t9 end=t12.5
  • Implementation Details• Query (source, destination, max bandwidth, volume, max hop count) – Find reachable set from source to destination – Search time windows • If reservation request can not fit into the time window skip • Get active reservations for the time window • Query and obtain a value object for the time window • Calculate max bandwidth using the value object • Examine whether request can be satisfied or not? – Return a reservation request – Start time, end time – Bandwidth to allocate – Path Value (bandwidth, eng metric, hop count)Reachable set (hop count?)
  • Time Steps and Reservations
  • Experimenting Flexible Reservation ServiceEach point is average of 100 measurement  Random graphs  Set 1: sparse graph  Set 2: dense graph
  • Experimenting Flexible Reservation Service
  • Experimenting Flexible Reservation Service
  • Experimenting Flexible Reservation Service (hopCount = 10) (set 1)
  • Experimenting Flexible Reservation Service (hopCount = 10) (set 1)
  • Summary● A new methodology in which users submit constraintsand the system suggests possible reservation optionssatisfying requirements● Polynomial-time algorithm, where the user species the total volume that needs to be transferred, a maximum bandwidth that he/she can use, and a desired time period within which the transfer should be done.● Quite practical even it is applied to large networks with thousands of routers and links● Implemented our algorithm as a new library (not specific to OSCARS) – any reservation system can use that
  • ThanksSpecial Thanks to David Robertson, MaryThompson, Chin Guok @ ESNet Scientific Data Management Research Group http://sdm.lbl.gov Mehmet Balman mbalman@lbl.gov sdm.lbl.gov/~balman
  • BACKUP slides
  • Implementation Details• Value – bandwidth values used to calculate path in each step (searching time windows) – Keeps only related link values• ValueBucket – Register reservation list – Initialize with a reachable set – Query value object by giving a set of active reservations• Keeps the status of the topology for a specific time interval
  • Implementation Details• Flow – Register graph object – Find the reachable set with the given maximum hop count – Load a value object – Find maximum bandwidth from source to destination – No unnecessary memory allocation• Suggest – Register graph object – Register reservation list – Update time window list if necessary – Search time windows – Suggest a reservation request for earliest completion time or shortest duration
  • Implementation• Graph object• Reservation list – Register graph – Register reservations• Query (source, destination, max bandwidth, volume, max hop count) – Find reachable set from source to destination – Search time windows • If reservation request can not fit into the time window skip • Get active reservations for the time window • Query and obtain a value object for the time window • Calculate max bandwidth using the value object • Examine whether request can be satisfied or not? – Return a reservation request – Start time, end time – Bandwidth to allocate – Path Value (bandwidth, eng metric, hop count)
  • Modular Design for easy integration into OSCARS• Graph object, and Reservation objects already exist in OSCARS – No need to replace them• Other objects need to be added to OSCARS, including: – Time Window object, – Flow object, – Value Bucket object, – Suggest object• Using “Registration” (reference) method, not “Loading” method – E.g. in “flow”, a new graph needs to be only registered; no need to recreate a new object – This approach supports modularity
  • Demo
  • DemoGenerated graph has 12 nodes (node1 to node12 800Mbps available) (node1 to node5 800Mbps available )Reservations from node1 to node12 1 )max bandwidth 500, volume 3600000 (2hours x 500), start now 2) max bandwidth 300, volume 2160000 (2hours x 300), start after 1hour 3) max bandwidth 800, volume 2880000(1hours x 800), start after 4 hours 4) max bandwidth 200, volume 1440000 (2hours x 200), start after 6 hours 5) max bandwidth 300, volume 2160000 (2hours x 300), start after 7 hoursFor each: Ask for a reservation request for earliest completion time Apply the reservationnode1 to node12 max bandwidth 700, volume 4320000(2hours x 600)node1 to node5 max bandwidth 700, volume 4320000(2hours x 600)
  • Demonow 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 hours 500 reservations 300 800 200 300 Time windows Available bandwidth from node1 to node12 300 0 500 800 0 800 600 300 Available bandwidth from node1 to node5 (node1 to node8) 500 200 700 800 200 800 800 500
  • Demo