Social Network Analysis
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  • 1. Social Network Analysis Elena Baleva
  • 2. What is a social network? An online service, platform, or site Focuses on facilitating the building of social networks or social relations among people who share interests, activities, backgrounds, or real-life connections Allows users to share ideas, activities, events, and interests within their individual networks
  • 3. Structure A representation of each user (often a profile) His/her social links A variety of additional services
  • 4.  Most social network services are web-based Online community services are sometimes considered as a social network service  Social network service usually means an individual- centered service whereas online community services are group-centered
  • 5. Nielsen Social Media Report 2012
  • 6. CASE STUDIES
  • 7. #McDStories First used the hashtag #MeetTheFarmers and started generating the desired positive responses Switched to #McDStories with the expectation that fans would share their positive experiences  Instead, the tag became a way for animal activists and less- than-satisfied diners to air their grievances
  • 8.  Within an hour, McDonalds saw that the campaign was not going as planned and was negative enough to cause a change of course
  • 9.  McDonalds quickly pulled down the promoted hashtag  #McFail used by those discussing the fiasco
  • 10.  Within an hour of pulling #McDStories the number of conversations about it fell off from a peak of 1,600 to a few dozen  72,788 mentions of McDonalds overall that day  #McDStories - only 2% of that With all social media campaigns, contingency plans included should the conversation not go as planned  The ability to change midstream helped this small blip from becoming something larger
  • 11. Lessons "Follower" ≠"Advocate“ Let the data rule  Social listening and audience analysis are a critical part of strategy development Where there is a reputation problem, consumer education is key in managing it
  • 12.  Social media is a notorious vehicle for losing control  Give up a certain measure of control of your brand to its followers Try and create some kind of guidance and scope by controlling what can be discussed  The #MeetTheFarmers hashtag focused the consumers’ minds upon what was the true message of the McDonalds Twitter campaign
  • 13. “Our Food. Your Questions” McDonald’s Canada A website that allows customers to submit queries to McDonalds Canada
  • 14.  Research showed that Canadian customers had questions Some myths were out there  Clarify some of the info by developing a platform
  • 15.  Released a series of videos answering consumer questions about the food The photo-shoot videos have attracted more than 12 million views on YouTube  The top viewing location was the U.S.
  • 16.  The borderless nature of social media is essential  "The way that social media is, each area of the world [McDonalds is in] is able to launch something and other areas can benefit" - Heather Oldani, senior director-external communications for McDonalds USA
  • 17. Lessons McDonalds Canada provided content that was not polarizing - it focused on specific processes related to the product It did not give consumers too many opportunities to trash it, and it stayed away from potentially touchy issues Too much control is not a better practice either  McDonalds Canada did not allow users to comment on the YouTube pages  Implies dubious intentions as it gives users no space to talk to the brand
  • 18. “It’s Your Lunch, Take It” Campaign - April 17-May 29, 2012 Encouraged people to take their lunch hour back and enjoy it at McDonalds
  • 19. Objectives Increase the bottom line Drive traffic in - particularly during lunch time Focus on premium products - Angus Burgers and premium chicken sandwiches  Boost sales and interest of those products during lunchtime as well as throughout the day
  • 20.  Built around the idea of inspiring people to escape from their desks at lunch  Tapping the spirit of Occupy Wall Street in ads Tag lines like "A lunch revolution has begun", "Its time to overthrow the working lunch", "A sesame seed of revolt has been planted", "Say no to crumbs in the keyboard"
  • 21. Campaign Target - 18-49-year-olds in the U.S. About sparking a conversation in a simple way  Through likes and comments on their page posts  Simple actions that spread virally across Facebook (friends seeing their friends doing it and doing it too)
  • 22.  The Facebook page - the hub of an integrated campaign, featured TV spots inviting people to visit the page to learn more about taking back lunch  "Lunch" Facebook tab  Invited people to "Read the Manifesto"  "Today we put an end to the working lunch and start working on eating it at McDonalds" and share it with friends
  • 23.  Began with Facebook posts that DDB promoted as ads across the social media site All of the posts that had messaging specific to this campaign were promoted  Variety of posts used - from simple photo images to questions and video posts Variety of content delivered through an assortment of social-media channels - key to developing consumer relationships
  • 24.  Clicking on any one of the ads takes the consumer to a dedicated Facebook page with complimentary videos and images where fans can pledge, and share their support for the movement  The first week generated nearly 560 shares of the page, and comments in many different languages
  • 25. Results Campaigns return was up to 4 times the companys initial investment Increase in sales and guest counts after the campaign
  • 26. Lessons The magic mix that allows consumers to engage, react, and be a part of the action Talk about things that resonate with them Collaboration and openness (not just between Facebook and McDonalds, but also their agencies)
  • 27.  The most commonly used social media Uses graph and activities to target demographics and people Building trust and doing things, such as sharing valuable content, news articles and special offers, are essential
  • 28.  Best used to grab the people’s attention and generate traffic to a desired website Interesting content being presented is key Use of appropriate hashtags is of utmost importance
  • 29.  Great way to reach out to millions of potential customers  BUT much harder to target a particular audience as compared to other social networks Great to use for presentations, webinars, testimonials, and announcements Videos can be more engaging and shareable  A great way to complement other marketing initiatives
  • 30. IDEA Identify the mass influencers Deliver groundswell customer service Empower your customers with information Amplify your fans
  • 31. MOST IMPORTANT GUIDELINE Be engaging and interact with your consumers by both listening and responding to their comments and feedback