Kamal EDCI 736 Final Tutorial

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EDCI 736 Final

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  • Content Management Systems (CMS)
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  • Kamal EDCI 736 Final Tutorial

    1. 1. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN TUTORIAL Bakor Kamal EDCI 763
    2. 2. Outlines <ul><li>Tutorial Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Introductory Definitions </li></ul><ul><li>Step 1: Statement of Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Needs Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Task Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4: Learner Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Step 5: Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Step 6: Design </li></ul><ul><li>Step 7: Evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>References </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    3. 3. Tutorial Overview <ul><li>In this tutorial I will explain the required steps to develop an instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>I will start with an introductory definitions and then will move to the steps of creating an instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>After some of the steps I added a tip that is reflecting some of my own ideas regarding that step. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    4. 4. Introductory Definitions <ul><li>Instructional Design is: “ a systematic process that is employed to develop education and training programs in a consistent and reliable fashion ” (Reiser & Dempsey, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Why Instructional Design? </li></ul><ul><li>The need for ID came from the need for having tools to help in everyday planning and assessing tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Design Model is the: ” guidelines or frameworks to organize and structure the process of creating instructional activities ”( Wikipedia ). </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    5. 5. Step 1: Statement of Purpose <ul><li>In the Statement of Purpose section you should simply describe what the instructions supposed to accomplish. </li></ul><ul><li>An example of it would be ” This tutorial will enable computer users to upgrade their computer’s speed ”. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    6. 6. Step 2: Needs Analysis <ul><li>Need Analysis is the process for determining the required changes and factors which include who want the change to occur and in what environment it should occur(Brown & Green, 2006, p. 88). </li></ul><ul><li>When . in the early phases. </li></ul><ul><li>How . Need analysis can be conducted through many approached such as Mager’s Performance Analysis approach or Rossett’s Five-Sep Approach . </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    7. 7. Step 2: Needs Analysis (Cont.) <ul><li>Rossett’s Five-Sep approach allows the instructional designer to gather information about what is the optimal performance, what is the actual performance, what is the individual feeling, the cause of the lack in the individual performance, and what are the possible solutions. The five steps are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine what type of situation initiates the problem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine who has the needed information and where . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select the needed tools to gather the data . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conduct need assessment in stages. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the collected information to develop an appropriate solution . </li></ul></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    8. 8. Step 2: Needs Analysis (Cont.) <ul><li>Mager’s Performance Analysis approach allows the instructional designer to determine “ what individuals are currently doing and what they should be doing ” (Brown & Green, 2006). Robert F. Mager has developed 12 steps (drown in a flowchart) that the designer needs to follow to do the analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>ID need to ask questions to apply the approach. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    9. 9. Step 2: Needs Analysis (Cont.) Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University Image source: http://www.cognitivedesignsolutions.com/PerfSupport/PerfSupport1.htm
    10. 10. Step 3: Task Analysis <ul><li>In this step develop a flowchart that start with the purpose of the instruction in the top as the following: </li></ul><ul><li>The statement of propose in the blue box. </li></ul><ul><li>Add the required prior knowledge in a rectangle as the one in the green box. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    11. 11. Step 3: Task Analysis (Cont.) <ul><li>Break the task to subsequence tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Break each task to subtasks if needed and number it as the following (1,2,2.1,2.2,2.3,…) </li></ul><ul><li>Use arrows to indicate the flow of instructions. </li></ul><ul><li>Cacoo.com provide free user-friendly online drawing tools. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    12. 12. Step 4: Learner Analysis <ul><li>In this step you need to determine the learners’ approach to the instruction, including their prerequisite knowledge, skills, and attitude toward the task (Brown & Green, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>This can be done by asking questions based on one of the learner analysis approaches such as Heinich, Molenda, Russell, & Smaldino as well as Dick, Carey, & Carey’s learner analysis approach . </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    13. 13. Step 4: Learner Analysis (Cont.) <ul><li>The aspects that you need to know about your learners are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Characteristics such as the age, sex, country, and education level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attitudes and/or Motivation toward the Subjects . Are they “ Willing Volunteers” participants or “ Captive Audiences” ( see Green, 2006, p.124 )?. Are their motivations “ extrinsic” or “ intrinsic” (see Green, 2006, p. 125) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific Entry Competencies Prior knowledge. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning Styles ex. learners are expecting and often prefer visual and bodily-kinesthetic activities to learn. </li></ul></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    14. 14. Step 5: Objectives <ul><li>In the objectives section you need to state what you expect the learners to achieve as a result of applying the instructions. </li></ul><ul><li>Use assessable terms. </li></ul><ul><li>Each objective reflect a task from the Task analysis section. </li></ul><ul><li>Each objective should be measurable . </li></ul><ul><li>An example of objective could be: “ Students will locate the RAM’s slot on the motherboard” . </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    15. 15. Step 6: Design <ul><li>In this step show the instructions of accomplishing the main task. You can do this in a PowerPoint show, video tutorial, pictures, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Relate each step in your instruction with the corresponding objective you have. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Write the part number (Slide number in PowerPoint case) followed by the corresponded objective’s number. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Slide 1 is an introductory slide and slide number 2 correspond to objective number 1.1. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #1- all </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #2- 1.1 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #3- 1.2 </li></ul></ul></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    16. 16. Step 6: Design <ul><li>In some case one slide can lead to multiple slides; in such case add the other slides numbers after </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Slide number 2 can lead to slide 5, 8, or 11. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #1- all </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #2- 1.1 5, 8, 11 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slide #3- 1.2 </li></ul></ul></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    17. 17. Step 7: Evaluation <ul><li>The purpose of this step it to determine how well the learner has master the objective. </li></ul><ul><li>Before the start of this step make sure that your objectives are measurable. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask the learners to perform the objectives tasks to evaluate them based on their performances. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex. “ Locate the correct RAM slot on the motherboard .” </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University
    18. 18. References <ul><li>Brown, A, & Green, T. (2006). The Essentials of instructional design. Columbus: </li></ul><ul><li>Pearson. </li></ul><ul><li>Reiser, R.A. & Dempsey, J.V. (2007). Trends and issues in instructional design and </li></ul><ul><li>technology (2nd Edition). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill Prentice </li></ul><ul><li>Hall. </li></ul>Dec 2010 - Bakor Kamal - Kansas State University

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