EAST BATON ROUGE           PARISH  FOOD ACCESS     POLICY   COMMISSION                            Launch &                ...
Commission Mandate#1) Problem AnalysisExamine the causes behind food deserts in EastBaton Rouge Parish.#2) Best Practice A...
Commission MembersRev. Jesse Bilberry, Pastor, Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church; Moderator, 4th District   Baptist        Associ...
What is a “food         desert”? General     an area with inadequate access todefinition   fresh, affordable foods needed ...
What is a “food          desert”? USDA       A low income census tract where adefinitio   substantial number or share of r...
USDA Data for EBR Parish(2010)      USDA food   About 75,500        desert    EBR residents       census     live in food ...
Pennington Data for EBR Parish      (2012)                                                        Areas within 1          ...
A closer look at 7 food       deserts …                              1 4                                  6               ...
#1) Scotlandville                                                        About                                            ...
#2) Downtown / Old South                                                           About                                  ...
About#3) South Baton                                         20,000                                                       ...
#4) Zion City /                                                          Greenwell                                        ...
#5) Mid City                                                        About                                                 ...
#6) North Forest / Red        Oaks                                                        About 9,000                     ...
#7) S. Sherwood Forest / I-12, Coursey                                                        About 6,300                 ...
Sample of other mappingresources  Grocery store                                                        Poverty            ...
Proposed Work Plan                                                                      July -Februar          March &    ...
Special CommitteeMarket opportunity analysisObjectiveIdentify areas with current market potential and lay foundationfor de...
Phase 1 CommitteeProblem analysisObjectiveExamine the causes behind food deserts and other low foodaccess areas in East Ba...
Phase 2 CommitteeBest practice analysisObjectiveDetermine best practices around the nation for attractingretail and other ...
Phase 3 CommitteeRecommending solutionsObjectiveConduct public engagement around options for action anddevelop final recom...
WWW.TOGETHERBR.ORGCONTACT@TOGETHERBR.ORG
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Food Deserts in Baton Rouge

971 views
823 views

Published on

Presentation about food deserts in Baton Rouge and the charge for the Food Access Policy Commission, created by Together Baton Rouge. (Effort is supported by the Mayor's Health City Initiative and BlueCross BlueShield.)

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
971
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Food Deserts in Baton Rouge

  1. 1. EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH FOOD ACCESS POLICY COMMISSION Launch & Orientation Mt. Pilgrim Baptist ChurchFebruary 14, 2013
  2. 2. Commission Mandate#1) Problem AnalysisExamine the causes behind food deserts in EastBaton Rouge Parish.#2) Best Practice AnalysisDetermine best practices around the nation forattracting retail and other high-quality foodproviders to food desert communities.#3) Recommend SolutionsDevelop concrete policy and practicerecommendations for East Baton Rouge Parish toaddress food deserts and other areas with low food
  3. 3. Commission MembersRev. Jesse Bilberry, Pastor, Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church; Moderator, 4th District Baptist AssociationMr. Chip Boyles, EBR Redevelopment Authority, Vice President of Administration & ProgramsDr. Stephanie Broyles, Pennington Biomedical, Assistant ProfessorDr. Adell Brown, Jr., Southern University AgCenter, Vice Chancellor for ResearchMr. Edgar Cage, Together Baton Rouge, Food Access Team Co-chairMr. Clint Caldwell, Associated Grocers, Director of Business DevelopmentMr. David Gray, Louisiana Budget Project, Policy AnalystMr. Ty Harvison, Latter & Blum, Commercial Real EstateMr. Ed Johnson, Wal-martDr. Kenneth Koonce, LSU Dean, College of Agriculture, LSU Agricultural CenterMr. Mike Manning, Greater BR Food Bank, President & CEOMr. Jared Smith, Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Director of Business Development
  4. 4. What is a “food desert”? General an area with inadequate access todefinition fresh, affordable foods needed to maintain a healthy diet.
  5. 5. What is a “food desert”? USDA A low income census tract where adefinitio substantial number or share of residents n has low access to a supermarket or large grocery store. “Low-income” “Low-access” At least 500 people or Census tract with at 33% of the population least 20% of residents resides one mile or more below poverty OR from a supermarket or median family income large grocery store (10 below 80% of area’s miles for rural census median family income. tracts).
  6. 6. USDA Data for EBR Parish(2010) USDA food About 75,500 desert EBR residents census live in food tracts deserts. 39% in poverty. 16,700 are children.
  7. 7. Pennington Data for EBR Parish (2012) Areas within 1 mile of grocery store As many as 103,000 EBR residents live in food deserts. Low- income 25,000 are census children. tractsKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  8. 8. A closer look at 7 food deserts … 1 4 6 2 5 7 3Katy Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  9. 9. #1) Scotlandville About 25,900 persons. 34% living in poverty 6,500 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  10. 10. #2) Downtown / Old South About 15,700 persons. 39% living in poverty 3,300 children Katy Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; Pennington Biomedical
  11. 11. About#3) South Baton 20,000 persons.Rouge 41% living in poverty 3,300 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; Pennington
  12. 12. #4) Zion City / Greenwell Springs About 14,400 persons. 22% living in poverty 4,000 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  13. 13. #5) Mid City About 11,900 persons. 38% living in poverty 3,400 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; Pennington
  14. 14. #6) North Forest / Red Oaks About 9,000 persons. 38% living in poverty 3,300 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  15. 15. #7) S. Sherwood Forest / I-12, Coursey About 6,300 persons. 24% living in poverty 1,500 childrenKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  16. 16. Sample of other mappingresources Grocery store Poverty accessKaty Drazba, MPH & Stephanie Broyles, PhD; PenningtonBiomedical
  17. 17. Proposed Work Plan July -Februar March & May & October y April June FormalizeLaunch 1 Problem analysis 2 Best practices analysis 3 Options & Draft Recommendations CONCURRENT LY Market opportunity analysis
  18. 18. Special CommitteeMarket opportunity analysisObjectiveIdentify areas with current market potential and lay foundationfor development deals.ActionsConduct market analysis of all low food access areas.Conduct “gap analysis” to determine area leakage.Identify the areas with most market demand potential.Identify prospects for land or land acquisition.Conduct any other analysis that would be useful for attractingretail.Work toward possible deals.TimelineStarting at launch and continuing throughout.
  19. 19. Phase 1 CommitteeProblem analysisObjectiveExamine the causes behind food deserts and other low foodaccess areas in East Baton Rouge Parish.KeyQuestionsWhat are the causes behind food deserts in EBR?What are the consequences for residents living in fooddeserts?Analysis of different food deserts in EBR.Why did previous food retail outlets in food desert areas closedown?What are the barriers to development for high-quality foodTimelineoptions?March & April 2013
  20. 20. Phase 2 CommitteeBest practice analysisObjectiveDetermine best practices around the nation for attractingretail and other high-quality food providers to food desertcommunities.ActionsIdentify, categorize and assess the success of modelapproaches across the country, including efforts to:a) attract retail;b) address area demand;c) foster non-traditional options (e.g. food co-ops, farmers markets, urban agriculture, etc.)TimelineMay & June 2013
  21. 21. Phase 3 CommitteeRecommending solutionsObjectiveConduct public engagement around options for action anddevelop final recommendations.ActionsFormalize options for action to address food deserts.Conduct public engagement around possible options.Conduct feasibility and cost assessments for variousstrategies.Develop final report of recommendations.TimelineJuly – October 2013
  22. 22. WWW.TOGETHERBR.ORGCONTACT@TOGETHERBR.ORG

×