Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Software Engineering:COMP111Part 11D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege
Chapter 1Software and Software EngineeringD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege2
Software’s Dual RoleD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege3Software is a productDelivers computing potentialProduces, m...
What is Software?D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege4Software is a set of items or objectsthat form a “configuration” t...
What is Software?D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege5software is engineeredsoftware doesn’t wear outsoftware is comp...
Wear vs. DeteriorationD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege6idealizedcurvechangeactualcurveFailurerateTimeincreasedfailur...
Software ApplicationsD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege7system softwareapplication softwareengineering/scientific s...
Software—New CategoriesD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege8 Ubiquitous computing—wireless networks Netsourcing—the We...
Legacy SoftwareD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege9software must be adapted to meet the needs of new computingenvironm...
Software EvolutionD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege10 The Law of Continuing Change (1974): E-type systems must be co...
Software MythsD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege11Affect managers, customers (and other non-technicalstakeholders) an...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Ch01-Introduction About Software Engineering

707

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
707
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Ch01-Introduction About Software Engineering"

  1. 1. Software Engineering:COMP111Part 11D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege
  2. 2. Chapter 1Software and Software EngineeringD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege2
  3. 3. Software’s Dual RoleD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege3Software is a productDelivers computing potentialProduces, manages, acquires, modifies, displays, or transmitsinformationSoftware is a vehicle for delivering a productSupports or directly provides system functionalityControls other programs (e.g., an operating system)Effects communications (e.g., networking software)Helps build other software (e.g., software tools)
  4. 4. What is Software?D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege4Software is a set of items or objectsthat form a “configuration” thatincludes• programs• documents• data ...
  5. 5. What is Software?D.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege5software is engineeredsoftware doesn’t wear outsoftware is complex
  6. 6. Wear vs. DeteriorationD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege6idealizedcurvechangeactualcurveFailurerateTimeincreasedfailurerate duetosideeffects
  7. 7. Software ApplicationsD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege7system softwareapplication softwareengineering/scientific softwareembedded softwareproduct-line softwareWebApps (Web applications)AI software
  8. 8. Software—New CategoriesD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege8 Ubiquitous computing—wireless networks Netsourcing—the Web as a computing engine Open source—”free” source code open to the computing community (ablessing, but also a potential curse!) Also … (see Chapter 32) Data mining Grid computing Cognitive machines Software for nanotechnologies
  9. 9. Legacy SoftwareD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege9software must be adapted to meet the needs of new computingenvironments or technology.software must be enhanced to implement new businessrequirements.software must be extended to make it interoperable with othermore modern systems or databases.software must be re-architected to make it viable within a networkenvironment.Why must it change?
  10. 10. Software EvolutionD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege10 The Law of Continuing Change (1974): E-type systems must be continually adapted else they become progressively lesssatisfactory. The Law of Increasing Complexity (1974): As an E-type system evolves its complexity increases unless work is done tomaintain or reduce it. The Law of Self Regulation (1974): The E-type system evolution process is self-regulating with distribution of productand process measures close to normal. The Law of Conservation of Organizational Stability (1980): The average effective global activity rate in an evolving E-type system is invariant over product lifetime. The Law of Conservation of Familiarity (1980): As an E-type system evolves all associated with it, developers, salespersonnel, users, for example, must maintain mastery of its content and behavior to achieve satisfactory evolution. The Law of Continuing Growth (1980): The functional content of E-type systems must be continually increased tomaintain user satisfaction over their lifetime. The Law of Declining Quality (1996): The quality of E-type systems will appear to be declining unless they arerigorously maintained and adapted to operational environment changes. The Feedback System Law (1996): E-type evolution processes constitute multi-level, multi-loop, multi-agent feedbacksystems and must be treated as such to achieve significant improvement over any reasonable base.Source: Lehman, M., et al, “Metrics and Laws of Software Evolution—The Nineties View,”Proceedings of the 4th International Software Metrics Symposium (METRICS 97), IEEE, 1997, can bedownloaded from: http://www.ece.utexas.edu/~perry/work/papers/feast1.pdf
  11. 11. Software MythsD.Balaganesh-Lincoln UniversityCollege11Affect managers, customers (and other non-technicalstakeholders) and practitionersAre believable because they often have elements of truth,but …Invariably lead to bad decisions,therefore …Insist on reality as you navigate your way through softwareengineering
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×