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Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
Unit 11 Customer relations in business
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Unit 11 Customer relations in business

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Unit 11 Customer Relations in Business

Unit 11 Customer Relations in Business

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  • Photo: © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation
  • Photo: © Dash, shutterstock.com
  • Note that this definition of a customer is revised on slide 6. Students should recognize that customers are often other organizations. If they are struggling to think of examples, prompt them to think about supermarkets such as Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, etc. These supermarkets are all customers as they buy from companies such as Kellogg's, Heinz, etc. Other examples of organizations buying from other organizations could be bookshops, music stores, clothes shops, etc. Equally, you could discuss manufacturers of computers, motor vehicles and mobile phones (e.g. batteries). Photo: © Yuri Arcurs, shutterstock.com
  • What types of businesses might these organizations be customers of? Encourage students to consider each organization in turn. They might suggest that the retail store could be a customer of a wholesaler and a designer, or that the restaurant could be a customer of a local farmer. As an extension activity – and to tie into their learning from Unit 1 – you might want to ask students to look at the image again and consider whether you have to pay to use the services of each organization. As a class, you could then discuss the different aims of the organizations and how each is funded.
  • Photo: © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation
  • The key feature of the ICS definition is that customer service is not the responsibility of just one person, but of the whole organization. You might want to show students the ICS website to demonstrate that customer service is such an important concept that it has its own professional body to provide advice and services for people delivering customer service. Source: Institute of Customer Service (ICS) www.instituteofcustomerservice.com ICS is the professional body for customer service. Leading customer service performance and professionalism, ICS aspires to be the authoritative voice of customer service – the touchstone for all those whose focus is on the delivery of world-class service experiences. ICS is a membership body with a community of more than 350 organizational members – from across the private, public and third sectors – and nearly 7,000 individual members.
  • This activity is intended to show students that customer service can cover a range of different activities. The ‘needs’ listed do have some links with Unit 3 Investigating Financial Control and are covered in 3.4 Recording Financial Transactions . Students may not have covered this topic yet, but you may want to ask students what the possible consequences might be if the activities listed were not recorded properly (especially ordering goods, chasing up orders and returning goods) as this should assist students in their understanding of Unit 3. This click to link interactive is printable either as a solved answer sheet (when the print button is pressed after the activity has been solved) or as an unsolved worksheet at any other time.
  • Using the customer needs listed in the image bank, encourage students to discuss their experiences as customers. If students do not have sufficient experiences of their own, they could use their parents’ or friends’ experiences, or even invent possible situations. When working on their mind map, students should be encouraged to think of their own ideas, key words and images to add in.
  • As an extension activity you could ask students to suggest additional words or phrases that they think are relevant, e.g. ability to explain, organized, quick, etc.
  • Students could work in groups to consider different areas. Suitable prompts could be: staff who are dealing with technical products (knowledge) food preparation (cleanliness) the elderly (patience) legal and medical matters (confidence) beauty products (good looks/smart appearance).
  • Photo: © shellyagami-photoar, shutterstock.com
  • Students may suggest sources including the Internet, leaflets, product packaging, catalogues, etc.
  • Students should recognize that student services and websites can only provide general information. A course tutor should have a greater knowledge of the course and be able to ascertain if it meets the prospective students’ specific needs. The text in this activity reads: Advice is generally more personal than information. Information is usually of general interest to all possible users, whereas advice is usually specific to an individual customer's exact requirements. For example, information for prospective students interested in a course at college would usually be found in a course leaflet or a prospectus . Alternatively, students could look up information on the college website . However, more detailed advice a specific course would usually be better provided by the course tutor for that subject.
  • Students may suggest examples such as customers asking for help finding items, finding their way around the store if they have a physical impairment, or ordering goods and inquiring when certain items will be in stock.
  • Students need to recognize that ‘special needs’ applies to all customers. You might want to clarify this point by explaining to students that even a customer in a supermarket with a shopping list has their own special needs (i.e. the items on that list).
  • As an extension activity, students could suggest some further examples of special needs under each of the appropriate headings. This drag and drop interactive is printable either as a solved answer sheet (when the print button is pressed after the activity has been solved) or as an unsolved worksheet at any other time.
  • This topic is covered in more detail in Unit 2.3 Customer Service and Customer Satisfaction.
  • You might want to link this topic back to Unit 1.3 Business Aims and Objectives , which talks about how organizations set SMART objectives in order to achieve their aims. Students may suggest customer service-related targets along the lines of: responding to all written enquiries within five working days answering the telephone within three rings responding to e-mail enquiries within 24 hours despatching goods within 24 hours of an order. Photo: © Palto, shutterstock.com
  • Among other things, students might suggest that a company would be reluctant to publish details of their customer service targets or performance indicators as bad results could result in bad publicity. Photo: © Yuri Arcurs, shutterstock.com
  • The annual reports for the companies in this activity can be found at the following web addresses: Marks & Spencer: http://annualreport.marksandspencer.com/pdf/m&s_annual_report_2008.pdf Topps Tiles: http://miranda.hemscott.com/ir/tpt/download/pdf/2007Annual_Final.pdf BT: http://www.btplc.com/Report/Report08/pdf/AnnualReport2008.pdf Sainsbury’s: http://www.j-sainsbury.co.uk/ar08/downloads/pdf/sainsbury_ar2008_lowres.pdf HSBC: http://www.hsbc.com/1/PA_1_1_S5/content/assets/investor_relations/hsbc2007ara0.pdf Many Annual Reports can now be downloaded as PDF files from company websites. The most useful website for downloading free annual reports is www.ftannualreports.com.
  • Each frame in this activity is printable. To print the frame in full, the orange scroller must be at the top of the scroll bar. Photos: tree surgeon © Sally Wallis, shutterstock.com; guide dog © BorisDjuranovic, shutterstock.com ; CDs © Sergej Razvodovskij, shutterstock.com ; book © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation
  • One example has been given for each organization. Other answers may include: School: securing premises during the day, possibly security guards Train company: automatic locking doors, safety lines on platforms Hotel: food preparation precautions, room safes Shopping centre: security guards, security tags Airport: secured areas, document (passport) checks Office block: signing in procedures, CCTV.
  • This activity encourages students to think about what customers find important, but also to think about how each individual customer will have different priorities. This activity marks throughout in order to make sorting easier. Upon pressing ‘solve’, the suggested order will appear, which you may wish to use to aid further discussion if it is different to the order suggested by your class.
  • Photo: © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation
  • Photo: © Mountain hardcore, shutterstock.com
  • Photo: © Edyta Pawlowska, shutterstock.com
  • Students might suggest that if internal customer service is bad then many departments could be adversely affected. This HR Assistant is prevented from accessing information or indeed from doing any work.
  • This pairs game is colour-coded so that the organizations on the left match the internal customers on the right, i.e. ‘Airport’ is the same colour as ‘Baggage handlers’. Can you think of any other internal customers these organizations might have? In response to the question posed at the end of this activity, students might suggest that other internal customers for the organizations listed include: School/college : v isual aids staff Trains : d river Restaurant : dish washers Airport : air traffic controllers Cruise ship : captain Football ground: accounting staff Department store: buyers Waste collection: waste site operatives
  • This drag and drop interactive is printable either as a solved answer sheet (when the print button is pressed after the activity has been solved) or as an unsolved worksheet at any other time.
  • Photo: © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation
  • Photo: © Dash, shutterstock.com
  • Students might suggest: a retail store being a customer of a factory a coffee shop being a customer of an electricity supplier an architect being a customer of a stationery company.
  • Students need to be aware of the many different types of customer and their requirements. A simple starting point is to ask students how their needs and expectations are different to their parents’ and their grandparents’ requirements.
  • Photos: different cultures © Ramzi Pachicho, shutterstock.com, new customer © Yuri Arcurs, shutterstock.com, elderly © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation, business customers © Hugo Silveirinha Felix, shutterstock.com, repeat customers © Ndraka, shutterstock.com , special needs © Sean Nel, shutterstock.com, children © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation, families © 2008 Jupiterimages Corporation.
  • The question posed at the end of this activity reads: Look at the organizations again. Can you think of any strategies or products/services that organizations like these have developed to meet specific needs? Students might suggest Saga organizing holidays or Carling sponsoring music festivals. More information on any of these organizations can be found at: Saga – http://www.saga.co.uk/ Nintendo – http://www.nintendo.co.uk/ Sage Accounting Software – http://www.sage.co.uk/ Guide Dogs for the Blind – http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/ Thorpe Park – http://www.thorpepark.com/ Carling Black Label – http://www.carling.com/ Monsoon – http://www.monsoon.co.uk/ Marks & Spencer – http://www.marksandspencer.com/gp/node/n/42966030/026-6832231-1293205 This click to link interactive is printable either as a solved answer sheet (when the print button is pressed after the activity has been solved) or as an unsolved worksheet at any other time.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Customer relations in Business Unit 11 BTEC Level 2 First Business Session 1
    • 2. Learning objectivesContentsFor more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation Flash activity (these activities are not editable) Extension activity Web addresses Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page Printable activity Sound 2 of 27 2 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 3. Customer needs and expectations In this section, you will consider what customer service involves. Defining customer service Identifying customer needs and expectations Responding to customer needs and expectations 3 of 27 3 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 4. Customer service In this unit, the most important word is customer. Do you know what a customer is? You might think a customer is a person who buys goods or services. However, this is not always the case, as organizations can be customers themselves. Can you think of any examples of organizations that buy things from other organizations? 4 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 5. Customers of different organizations 5 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 6. Definition of customer We now know that customers can be either individuals or organizations, and that in order to be a customer, it is not essential to purchase the goods or services provided. Therefore, what do you think might be a better definition of a customer? Customer: a person or organization who uses a product or service. 6 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 7. Customer service Customer service is an organizations ability to identify and supply their customers wants and needs. The Institute of Customer Service (ICS) has a more complex, but complete, definition of customer service: “Customer service is the sum total of what an organization does to meet customer expectations and produce customer satisfaction. Customer service generally involves service teamwork and service partnerships. Although somebody may take a leading part in delivering customer service, it normally involves actions by a number of people in a team or in several different organizations.” What is the key feature of customer service according to the ICS definition? 7 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 8. Identifying customer needs 8 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 9. Identifying customer needs 9 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 10. Customer expectations 10 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 11. Customer expectations Customer expectations can be different depending upon the situation they are in. Consider the following customer expectations again: Polite Charming Good-looking Alert Patient Humorous Well-dressed Clean Intelligent Accurate Informed Confident Respectful Enthusiastic Competent Honest Reliable For each of the key words, suggest one type of organization – or job role – it would be most relevant to (e.g. police officers would need to be alert during their job). 11 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 12. Accuracy and reliability Customers will expect to be given accurate and reliable information about products and services. Accurate means that the information given is true and correct. Reliable means that the information given is honest and consistent. Can you think of any times when you have been given inaccurate or unreliable information? 12 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 13. Accuracy and reliability 13 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 14. Providing information and advice 14 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 15. Providing information and advice Customer service is not just about selling products or services to customers, it is also about ensuring that all their needs are met. This can involve providing large amounts of information and advice to assist the customer in choosing the most appropriate product or service. This information and advice may come from a variety of sources, not just from customer service staff. What other sources of information or advice can you think of in addition to customer service staff? 15 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 16. Providing information and advice 16 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 17. Providing information and advice 17 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 18. Assistance and help Most businesses will have a Customer Service department that customers can visit, not only to make complaints, but also to gain assistance and help. As well as face-to-face, assistance and help can also be given in other forms, including: by telephone online through printed material. What examples of assistance or help can you think of that customers might ask for? 18 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 19. Dealing with special needs All customers are likely to have special needs, which organizations must cater for. These needs may be related to: circumstances – requiring a product or information before a certain time or for a set purpose personal requirements – needing a product or information customized or adapted in a specific way individual traits – requiring different products or information because of beliefs, age, fashion preferences, etc. disability – needing special help due to problems with mobility or another impairment. 19 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 20. Dealing with special needs 20 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 21. Dealing with problems Problems with customer service arise when a customer’s needs and expectations have not been met. This could be something simple, such as a customer being unable to locate a particular product in a supermarket. Alternatively, it could be something more financially significant, such as a company not being able to supply sufficient goods. It could also be very serious, such as a company selling potentially lethal products to customers. Customer service staff must be trained to deal with simpler problems and know their employer’s procedures for passing on and recording more complex problems. 21 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 22. Organizational targets Most organizations will set targets for different aspects of business performance. Organizational targets (often referred to as performance indicators) are targets against which staff performance can be measured. Customer service targets are the targets set for those staff dealing directly with customers. In order to achieve the targets they set, organizations must ensure they are specific and measurable. What sort of customer service-related targets might organizations set for themselves? 22 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 23. Organizational targets Organizations are usually reluctant to publish details of customer service targets or performance indicators. Why do you think this might be? However, most large organizations will publish details of their customer service policies and strategies in their annual reports. These are usually available to download from company websites. 23 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 24. Organizational targets 24 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 25. Health, safety and security 25 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 26. Health, safety and security 26 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 27. Meeting customer needs 27 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 28. Contents Learning objectivesFor more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation Flash activity (these activities are not editable) Printable activity Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page 28 of 8 28 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 29. Internal customers In this section, you will consider the internal customers of organizations. Different internal customers The role of internal customers The importance of internal customer service 29 of 27 8 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 30. What is an internal customer? Can you remember how ‘customer’ is best defined? Customer: a person who uses a product or service. Most businesses will have employees who use the product or service of another section, department or person from within the same organization. These people are known as internal customers. Some employees will only ever deal with fellow employees and may never have any contact with the organization’s paying customers. 30 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 31. Internal customer service Internal customers are the employees in a business who need their colleagues to provide them with a service, such as information, data or help, so that they can do their jobs. Internal customers also need to receive good customer service. For example, this HR Assistant is an internal customer of the IT Support Administrator. She cannot access the employee database until her password is reset, but she has been left waiting on the phone. What does this example suggest to you about the importance of good internal customer service? 31 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 32. Snap! 32 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 33. The importance of internal customer service 33 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 34. Contents Learning objectivesFor more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation Flash activity (these activities are not editable) Key skills Web addresses Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page Printable activity 34 of 9 34 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 35. External customers In this section, you will consider the external customers of organizations. Different external customers Identifying external customers Categorizing external customers Meeting customers’ needs 35 of 27 9 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 36. What is an external customer? A business must provide customer service for two types of customer: internal and external. External customers are the people or organizations who use another organization’s goods or services. For example, a supermarket is a business that sells milk, but it buys that milk from a dairy farmer. Therefore, the supermarket is an external customer. Think of three other examples of when a business is an external customer. 36 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 37. Needs of external customers External customers are the people who contact an organization in line with their specific needs. Organizations will try to identify the type of customers that are most likely to be interested in their products or services and cater to these requirements. Different types of customers will, of course, have different needs. A successful organization will have a good understanding of what its customers’ specific requirements are and will devise procedures to ensure these requirements are met. 37 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 38. Categorizing external customers 38 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 39. Meeting customers’ needs 39 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008
    • 40. Internal or external? 40 of 27 © Boardworks Ltd 2008

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