• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The mainstreaming of par in health care final version
 

The mainstreaming of par in health care final version

on

  • 3,091 views

Keynote at Heller School, Brandeis University

Keynote at Heller School, Brandeis University

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,091
Views on SlideShare
2,950
Embed Views
141

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0

5 Embeds 141

http://www.scoop.it 134
http://www.linkedin.com 3
https://www.linkedin.com 2
http://www.slideshare.net 1
https://twitter.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Not sure what else to say, hard act to follow…You know everything you need to know about PAR
  • Continuum exercise
  • Action Research is often visualised as a cycle in which a team of researchers and stakeholders identify desired outcomes, pilot approaches, evaluate their impact, suggest improvements, pilot the improved approach, and so on. The cycle aims to achieve a spiralling up of both theory and practice, as theory informs practice and practice continually refines theory.Key dimensions of Action Research are Involvement (of community or organisation members) and Improvement (development of practical solutions to improve their situation). As suggested by the name, Action Research has twin aims: to study a system (research), while collaborating with members of the system to improve it (action).
  • Alma FlorAda and Paulo Freire share ideas about Participatory Research as developed based on Paulo's principals of Critical Education.
  • This community-based, participatory action research project was facilitated by Robin R. R. Gray (Tsimshian/Mikisew Cree), a master's and doctoral student in socio-cultural anthropology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Using the Photovoice methodology, urban Native youth were provided with an opportunity to answer the question: How do urban Native youth interpret, and experience, the inter-generational affects of the Indian Residential School System in Canada? Responding to the concerns of their urban Native community and the greater Indigenous community at large, three youth participants--Herb Varley (Nuu-chah-nulth), Billie-Jeanne Sinclair (Nisga'a), and Daniel Cook (Nuu-chah-nulth/Nisga'a)--engaged in critical consciousness, educated the greater Vancouver community, and interrogated the intersection between pedagogy and power with their photos and in their presentation of them. The Photovoice exhibit and the results of the project, "," will be made available via the partnering organization, the Urban Native Youth Association, in the coming months.

The mainstreaming of par in health care final version The mainstreaming of par in health care final version Presentation Transcript

  • The Mainstreaming of Participatory Research in Health Care
    Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH
    Associate Professor
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    gonzalo.bacigalupe@umb.edu
    &
    Ikerbasque Research Professor
    University of Deusto, Bilbao
    http://bacigalupe.wordpress.com
  • Why do we do/need research?
    2
  • Why do we do/need research?
    3
  • Why do we do/need research?
    “Common sense” is not enough
    Gathering Information (for decision-making)
    Advancing knowledge
    To resolve specific problems
    To account for and learn from our practices (Reflexive-Action)
    4
  • The Taken for Granted
    Wadsworth, Y.  (1998) What is Participatory Action Research? Action Research International, Paper 2.  www.scu.edu.au/schools/gcm/ar/ari/p-ywadsworth98.html
    5
  • Instead… in PAR
    Wadsworth, Y.  (1998) What is Participatory Action Research? Action Research International, Paper 2.  www.scu.edu.au/schools/gcm/ar/ari/p-ywadsworth98.html
    6
  • Note:
    All science involves cyclical processes
    Who drives the process/content?
    Someone reflects and concludes
    Inquiry leads somewhere
    It’s inevitable: researchers are value-driven
    7
  • Why do we do/need research?
    “Common sense” is not enough
    Gathering Information (for decision-making)
    Advancing knowledge
    To resolve specific problems
    To account for and learn from our practices (Reflexive-Action)
    What’s missing in this equation? )
    (p + e + J)
    8
  • Partnerships
    9
  • PAR Definition
    A group, community, or network jointly:
    Diagnose a situation
    Works towards improving it
    Evaluate effectiveness
    Critically reflect
    10
  • 11
  • PAR Definition
    A group, community, or network jointly:
    Diagnose a situation
    Works towards improving it
    Evaluate effectiveness
    Critically reflect
    Participation is Key (period)
    It is action which is researched, changed and re-researched, within the research process by participants. (Wadsworth, 1998)
    12
  • Nina Wallerstein
    13
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJnWmL3YeIA
  • The Action Research Dimension
    14
  • PAR Cycle (s)
    15
  • Whitehead, D. (2005). Project management and action research: two sides of the same coin? Journal of Health Organization and Management, 19, 519-531.
    16
  • History
    17
    Action-Research (AR) Lewin 1940s
    Study things to change them
    PAR begins in L.A. late 1950s - 1960s, 1970s and on
    Franz Fanon (1960s): Trauma/Inersectionality
    FalsBorda (1959) in Colombia
    dominant knowledge (science)
    Reproduces status quo
    emergent knowledge (alternative/resistant)
    Transform
  • Paulo Freire
    Participatory Research is an intrinsic piece in Popular Education (1970s)
    Guided by principles of Liberation and Transformation
    Acknowledges that all human beings are capable of knowledge
    PR challenges belief that research should be conducted only by specialists; research should be part of everyone's life
    Praxis:
    The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.
    Karl Marx (1845), Theses on Feuerbach (Thesis XI)
    18
  • PAR in Latin America
    19
    Participants (the “subjects”) …. Research problem
    Define; Analyze; Resolve
    Goal of Research: to transform social reality
    It’s a permanent process of research and action
    It’s part of an educational experience
    Aids in accessing needs
    Consciousness raising
    Collective organization is core
    Note: Ignacio Martin-Baro & Maritza Montero
    De Witt, T., & Gianotten, V. (1988). Investigacion participativa en America Latina. Mexico DF: CENAPRO
  • 1984-1986
    20
  • Anglo DiscoveriesandMemories
    21
    Peter Reason (AR/PAR Seminal Book)
    Michelle Fine (youth empowerment/intersectionality)
    (and many in the world of social and critical psychology)
    Brinton Lykes (trauma/voice)
    but (because some of us are not so “grounded” and don’t write in the dominant lingua franca)
    Core is part of postcolonial developments in Asia and Africa and of transformative efforts in Latin America
  • PAR Example
    VOYCE
    Youth-led project with high school students using PAR
    Addresses drop out rate in Public High Schools
    7 different community organizations Chicago area.
    22
  • VOYCE
    23
  • 24
  • CBPR & Health Disparities
    25
    CBPR is not a research method but an orientation to research that emphasizes ‘‘equitable’’ engagement of all partners throughout the research process, from problem definition through data collection and analysis to the dissemination and use of findings to help affect change. Minkler (2010, p. S81)
  • The Benefits according to AHQR
    26
    Done properly, CBPR should benefit community participants, practitioners, and researchers alike. CBPR creates bridges between scientists and communities, allowing both to gain in knowledge and experience.This collaboration assists in developing culturally appropriate measurement instruments, thus making projects more effective and efficient.Finally, CBPR establishes a level of trust that enhances both the quantity and the quality of data collected.The ultimate benefit is the prospect of examining the community's own unique circumstances to test and adapt best practices to its own needs.
    Viswanathan M, Ammerman A, Eng E, Gartlehner G, Lohr KN, Griffith D, Rhodes S, Samuel-Hodge C, Maty S, Lux, L, Webb L, Sutton SF, Swinson T, Jackman A, Whitener L. Community-Based Participatory Research: Assessing the Evidence. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 99 (Prepared by RTI—University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-02-0016). AHRQ Publication 04-E022-2. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. July 2004.
  • 27
    Critical elements in CBPR (AHQR)
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=hserta&part=A148846&rendertype=table&id=A148983
  • AssAssessing the Evi
    28
    Viswanathan M, Ammerman A, Eng E, Gartlehner G, Lohr KN, Griffith D, Rhodes S, Samuel-Hodge C, Maty S, Lux, L, Webb L, Sutton SF, Swinson T, Jackman A, Whitener L. Community-Based Participatory Research: Assessing the Evidence. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 99 (Prepared by RTI—University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-02-0016). AHRQ Publication 04-E022-2. Rockville, MD: AHRQ. July 2004.
  • Distributive & Procedural Justice
    29
    Minkler, M. (2010). Linking science and policy through community-based participatory research to study and address health disparities. American Journal of Public Health, 100 Suppl 1, S81-87.
  • 30
    Literacy for Environmental Justice
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4zEncKHKdA (April 2010)
  • CBPR Lessons: Addressing Health Disparities
    31
    Policy changes and implementation require multiple stakeholders
    CBPR processes may create more policy momentums and thus we need to evaluate them for their ability to improve this environment and/or for scaffolding.
    Social technologies offer great opportunities for collaboration and all the requirements of organizing and researching (besides better ways of documenting)
  • Challenges
    32
    PAR demands relationships and trust (real)
    Academic timing versus community’s
    Diverse policy needs among stakeholders
    Financial rewards:
    equity, inequity, control
    funding venues create competition
    Academic versus communities deliverables
    Data triangulation is key
    Mass media likes “single individuals” and not communities to report success
    Collaborations exist in a gradient
  • The Participation Continuum
    33
  • What can academic types do?
    34
    Learn knowledge/skills relevant to the task at hand
    Develop relationships of solidarity
    Engage in actions that win victories & build self-sufficiency
    DOING RESEARCH IS NOT, IN ITSELF, A GOAL
    Stoecker, R. (2008). Are academics irrelevant? Approaches and roles for scholars in CBPR. In M. Minkler & N. Wallerstein (Eds.),
    Community-based participatory research for health: From process to outcomes. New York, Joseey-Bass
  • The Mainstreaming of Participatory Research in Health Care
    Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH
    Associate Professor
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    gonzalo.bacigalupe@umb.edu
    &
    Ikerbasque Research Professor
    University of Deusto, Bilbao
    http://bacigalupe.wordpress.com
  • 36
    gonzalo.bacigalupe@umb.edu