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Ap gov final
 

Ap gov final

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    Ap gov final Ap gov final Presentation Transcript

    • Media
    • William Randolph Hearst 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Used his influence to agitate was in Spain when Cubans rebelled against Spanish rule. Although running for Mayor of New York City, Governor of New York, and Lieutenant Governor of New York proved unsuccessful, his role in the media gained him enormous political influence. Founding a large newspaper empire allowed him to fund the construction of his beautiful castle in San Simeon.
    • Franklin Delano Roosevelt 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue His uncle built the West Wing of the White House in 1902 with a special room for reporters. During the Great Depression, he soothed America’s panic by broadcasting “Fireside Chats” by radio. He shared a “gentleman’s agreement” with the press, keeping them from photographing him below the waist.
    • CNN 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue When public confidence in the press decreased between 1985 and 189, it was considered by many as the most reliable source of political news. America’s first all-news television network and a place that programs such as “Larry King Live” call home. It’s success made a mogul of founder, Ted Turner.
    • Prior Restraint 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue An idea developed by William Blackstone in his Commentaries , published in 1765 Freedom from censorship or rules telling a newspaper in advance what it can publish.
    • Libel 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue In order to win this sort of case, one must be able to prove “actual malice” It’s spoken alternative is known as slander. A written statement that defames the character of another person.
    • Shield’s Law 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue In 1972, the Court said that Congress and state legislatures have these rights. More than half of states have passed these laws to protect press. Journalists’ rights not to reveal the sources of their information if tried in court.
    • TIME 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue In 1984, Israeli, General Arial Sharon’s libel suit against it could not be proven as malice. First published in 1923 and designed to keep the “busy man” well informed. Its signature red border was introduced in 1927 and changed just three times since.
    • FCC 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue In 1996, it approved the plan of big TV networks to limit free TV time to “major candidates.” Its creation was described by The Telecommunications Act of 1996 as “for the purpose of the national defense” and “for promoting safety of life and property through the use of wire and radio communication.” This independent agency was established by the Communications Act of 1934 and is charged with “regulating interstate and international commerce by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.”
    • Censorship 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue In in case dealing with this government activity, the New York Times won against the Supreme Court attempts to prevent the publishing of the Pentagon Papers. The government practiced this during World War I and World War II to preserve military secrets. Defined as to examining media in order to suppress or delete anything considered objectionable.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue During his era in politics, he did his best to address America’s biggest concerns, The Korean War, corruption in government, and the high cost of living. He became the first presidential candidate to use television commercials to promote his campaign. Paraphernalia such as pins and dresses featured the slogan of his supporters,“I like Ike.”
    • Yellow Journalism 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Term coined following the Spanish American War 1 st cartoon character printed in color Sole purpose was to sell newspapers
    • Television 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Vietnam was the first war that introduced this Eisenhower was the 1 st to utilize this Nixon and Kennedy’s most famous use of media
    • Ralph Nadar 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Co-founded Public Citizen and was a leader in the anti-nuclear power movement Consumer advocate Former Green Party candidate
    • Muckraker 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Ida Tarbell, John Rockefeller,Upton Sinclair Saw a rise in the Progressive Era Reporters committed to exposing the corruption of business practices
    • Leak 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Nixon created the “Plumbers” to prevent this Can politically damage the administrations Unauthorized release of information
    • Horse Race Journalism 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue When covering a political campaign, the media is most focused with reporting this Coverage of tracking polls Synonymous with score keeper
    • Penny Press 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Extended the influence of paper media to the poorer classes Represented the crudest form of journalism Was famous for being one cent per paper
    • Media Bias 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Prevalent in the newspapers in the 18 th and 19 th centuries Conservatives: news reporters Liberals: NBC, ABC Appeals strongly to one segment of the population but alienates another
    • Attack Journalism 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Known as “aggressive journalism” Junkyard dog style Caring only about bringing down a prominent person
    • Media Events 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue President Nixon’s trip to China Presidential elections Using media to promote one’s own interests, usually staged
    • Equal Time Rule 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue rule of federal communication commission Deals only with political candidates Broadcast stations must provide equivalent opportunity to any opposing candidates who request it.
    • Fairness Doctrine 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Policy of united states FCC introduced in 1949. Deals with the discussion of controversial issues. FCC abolished it because it believed it inhibited the free discussion of issues.
    • Trail balloon 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue A test of public opinion It often take the form of an intentional news leak to access public opinion. Story provided by the politician to the press to gauge public reaction
    • Routine stories 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Public events regularly covered by the reporters.. Involves relatively simple easily described acts or statements.. For example the supreme court rules on an important case.
    • Feature stories 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Public events knowable to any reporter who cares to enquire. . Involves acts and statements not routinely covered by a group of reporters.. For example an interest group works for the passage of the bill.
    • Insider stories 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Information not usually made public. Becomes public when someone with inside knowledge tells the reporter. .involves leak or investigative reporting.
    • Loaded language. 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Words that reflect a value judgment. used to persuade the listener without making an argument. .appeals to emotion.
    • Freedom of information act 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Signed by Lyndon B Johnson. Represents the implementation of freedom of information legislation in the United States. More meetings were opened to public under this act.
    • Selective attention 3 point clue 2 point clue 1 point clue Paying attention only to the story with which one agrees. This is how people view political adds on television. Citizen sees and hears only what he or she wants.
    •