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Introduction to CSS

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The introductory chapter to CSS: The Missing Manual

The introductory chapter to CSS: The Missing Manual

Published in: Technology

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Chapter 1 Rethinking HTML for CSS Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009
    • 2. HTML Past
      • <TABLE> tag intended to display spreadsheet-like data
        • research results
        • train schedules
        • etc.
      • <TABLE> tag used inappropriately to provide grid-like structure to a Web page
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 3. HTML Present
      • CSS lets HTML go back to doing what it does best – structure content, not page layout
        • use HTML to organize content
        • use CSS to make that content look great
      • Turning point – 2003
        • Jeffrey Zeldman ( www.zeldman.com )
        • Web Standards
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 4. Think Structure
      • HTML adds meaning to text – semantic meaning
        • <h1> implies page heading
        • <p> implies a paragraph of text
        • <table> implies a spreadsheet of data
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 5. Two New HTML Tags
      • Two generic tags that let you provide “handles” to attach CSS styles to different elements in a page
        • <div>
        • <span>
      • What are “ elements ”?
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 6. HTML Tags to Forget
      • <FONT> used for the display of text
      • <B> and <I> used to make text bold and italic
        • use <strong> and <em> instead
      • <TABLE> tag for page layout
      • <BODY> tag attributes
        • background , bgcolor , text , link , alink , vlink
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 7. Tips to Guide Your Way
      • Use only one <h1> tag per page
      • Use headings (<h2>, <h3>, etc.) to indicate the relative importance of text
      • Close all tags, especially single-sided tags
        • <br />, <img />, <link />
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 8. Importance of the Doctype
      • Document Type Definition (DTD)
        • an XML document that explains what tags, attributes and values are valid for a particular type of HTML
        • mistyping the doctype throws browsers in to “ quirks mode ”, a parallel universe where the browser thinks the time is 1999.
          • www.quirksmode.org
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1
    • 9. Importance of the Doctype
      • XHTML Strict Doctype disallows once-popular properties like the link’s target property
        • <a target=“_blank”> triggers the opening of a new window or tab when clicking a link
      • Personal choice: XHTML transitional
      Source: CSS | The Missing Manual Copyright 2009 Chapter 1