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Dealing with slackers

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Transcript

  • 1. Dealing With Slackers
    Craig Santoski
  • 2. Introduction
    Scott Myers- Associate Professor of Communication Studies at West Virginia University
    Nicole A. Smith, Mary A. Eidsness, Leah M Bogdan, Brooke A. Zackery, Michelle R. Thompson, Meghan E. Schoo, Angela N. Johnson
  • 3. Purpose
    Study views of students in college classroom work group
    How students react to slackers
    Recommendations of students of how to deal with slackers
  • 4. Data Collection
    Focus groups
    Five groups that lasted one hour with a total of 37 students
    Students were from an introductory small group communication course
  • 5. Research Questions
    What do group members find frustrating about working with slackers?
    How do group members deal with slackers?
    What recommendations would group members make for dealing with slackers?
  • 6. Why Focus Groups?
    When in focus groups you “listen, gather information, and try to understand how people feel or think about an issue, product, service, or idea”
    Individuals in focus groups are valuable sources of firsthand information who share this information if asked the right questions.
  • 7. During Focus Group
    Three or four team members: moderator, one or two notetakers, and a greeter
    Each team used the same questioning guide, which consisted of eleven questions
    Questions developed by the authorsprior to groups
    Only three of the questions served as the focal point
  • 8. Focus Groups
    Work well if used correctly
    Some answers are built on others responses
    Many people have responses that would not appear on paper
  • 9. Conclusion
    Three conclusions were drawn
    1. College students working in groups report working with slackers is frustrating due to a lack of indifference on the slackers’ part
    2. They either ignore or include slackers in the group task
    3. They would confront slackers during future group work
  • 10. Effectiveness
    Article was able to find how students feel about slackers in group work
    Found how students deal with slackers and what they will do with slackers in later group work