Human-Computer Interaction's 543 Yu-Hsuan Lin [email_address]
<ul><li>  </li></ul>5  Theories 4  Works 3  Self-studies
5 Theories
Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
 
Affordance Form Follows Function
Um, which door? <ul><li>  </li></ul>
 
Fitts' law
Tangible User Interface (TUI) v.s Graphic User Interface (GUI)
  Gestalt  Principle
Closure                       //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Closure                       //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Continuity                   //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Continuity                   //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Similarity                     //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Proximity                     //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Embodiment by Fishkin, 2004
4 Works
Marble Answering Machine <ul><li>by Durrell Bishop (1992) </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>  </li></ul>
<ul><li>  </li></ul>
Touch Projector <ul><li>  </li></ul>
iRis <ul><li>  </li></ul>
3 Self-studies
TurnOver <ul><li>  </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
 
UbiComp final project 2011 Yu-Hsuan Lin [email_address]
 
Reference <ul><ul><li>The Design of Everyday Things by DA Normen, 1998 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>J. Mankoff , A.K. Dey , ...
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HCI’s 543

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  • The design model is the conceptualization that the designer has in mind.  The user&apos;s model is what the user develops to explain the operation of the system.  Ideally,  the user&apos;s model and  the design model are equivalent.  However, the user and designer communicate only through the system itself:  its physical appearance, its operation, the way it responds, and the manuals and instructions that accompany it. Thus the system image  is critical: the designer must ensure that everything about the product is consistent with and exemplifies the operation of the proper conceptual model. All three aspects are important. The user&apos;s model is essential, of course, for that determines what is understood. In turn, it is up to the designer to start with a design model that is functional, learnable, and usable. The designer must ensure that the system reveals the appropriate system image. Only then can the user acquire the proper user&apos;s model and find support for the translation of intentions into actions and system state into interpretations. Remember, the user acquires all knowledge of  the system from that system image.
  • The design model is the conceptualization that the designer has in mind.  The user&apos;s model is what the user develops to explain the operation of the system.  Ideally,  the user&apos;s model and  the design model are equivalent.  However, the user and designer communicate only through the system itself:  its physical appearance, its operation, the way it responds, and the manuals and instructions that accompany it. Thus the system image  is critical: the designer must ensure that everything about the product is consistent with and exemplifies the operation of the proper conceptual model. All three aspects are important. The user&apos;s model is essential, of course, for that determines what is understood. In turn, it is up to the designer to start with a design model that is functional, learnable, and usable. The designer must ensure that the system reveals the appropriate system image. Only then can the user acquire the proper user&apos;s model and find support for the translation of intentions into actions and system state into interpretations. Remember, the user acquires all knowledge of  the system from that system image.
  • The design model is the conceptualization that the designer has in mind.  The user&apos;s model is what the user develops to explain the operation of the system.  Ideally,  the user&apos;s model and  the design model are equivalent.  However, the user and designer communicate only through the system itself:  its physical appearance, its operation, the way it responds, and the manuals and instructions that accompany it. Thus the system image  is critical: the designer must ensure that everything about the product is consistent with and exemplifies the operation of the proper conceptual model. All three aspects are important. The user&apos;s model is essential, of course, for that determines what is understood. In turn, it is up to the designer to start with a design model that is functional, learnable, and usable. The designer must ensure that the system reveals the appropriate system image. Only then can the user acquire the proper user&apos;s model and find support for the translation of intentions into actions and system state into interpretations. Remember, the user acquires all knowledge of  the system from that system image.
  • The design model is the conceptualization that the designer has in mind.  The user&apos;s model is what the user develops to explain the operation of the system.  Ideally,  the user&apos;s model and  the design model are equivalent.  However, the user and designer communicate only through the system itself:  its physical appearance, its operation, the way it responds, and the manuals and instructions that accompany it. Thus the system image  is critical: the designer must ensure that everything about the product is consistent with and exemplifies the operation of the proper conceptual model. All three aspects are important. The user&apos;s model is essential, of course, for that determines what is understood. In turn, it is up to the designer to start with a design model that is functional, learnable, and usable. The designer must ensure that the system reveals the appropriate system image. Only then can the user acquire the proper user&apos;s model and find support for the translation of intentions into actions and system state into interpretations. Remember, the user acquires all knowledge of  the system from that system image.
  • The design model is the conceptualization that the designer has in mind.  The user&apos;s model is what the user develops to explain the operation of the system.  Ideally,  the user&apos;s model and  the design model are equivalent.  However, the user and designer communicate only through the system itself:  its physical appearance, its operation, the way it responds, and the manuals and instructions that accompany it. Thus the system image  is critical: the designer must ensure that everything about the product is consistent with and exemplifies the operation of the proper conceptual model. All three aspects are important. The user&apos;s model is essential, of course, for that determines what is understood. In turn, it is up to the designer to start with a design model that is functional, learnable, and usable. The designer must ensure that the system reveals the appropriate system image. Only then can the user acquire the proper user&apos;s model and find support for the translation of intentions into actions and system state into interpretations. Remember, the user acquires all knowledge of  the system from that system image.
  • &amp;quot;the term affordance refers to the perceived and actual properties of the thing Affordances provide strong clues to the operations of things&amp;quot; for example, a door can have the affordance of &apos;openability&apos; it should tell you how to open the door, right? but look at the picture, the handle is a hand, should I push it, pull it, or.... shake it?
  • T  is the average of the total operation time. D  is the distance from the starting point to the center of the target. W  is the width of the target measured along the axis of motion. The Start button in Windows is seemingly located in an ideal place for fast acquisition, and in recent versions of Windows that’s certainly true. Prior to Windows 2000, however, the Start button had a single “dead” pixel along the left and bottom sides of it in which clicking didn’t open the Start menu. The result: slower acquisition times and a startling number of missed clicks.
  • GUI easy to program lowcost ex. iOS, Android, but  TUI more natural physical property sometimes they are difficult to choose which is better
  • they combine the smartphone and the book, so we can still flip the page, but its contents are more dynamic, also, the smartphone has a lot of sensors, ex microphone, accelerometer, touch-screen combine with books will be more interesting and more participating
  • Author: David Merril, Jeevan Kalanithi (both from MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, MA) Year: 2007(paper), 2009(TED) From: MIT Media Lab Paper:  Siftables: Towards Sensor Network User Interfaces, 2007 ACM Website:  http://sifteo.com/ every block have small screen, accelerometer, infrared sensor, they can sense how many blocks are connected, 4 sides, so 4 blocks at most children are easily to construct these blocks, also, because of the accelerometer, these blocks  can simulate tilt motion like pouring, merging colors, etc.
  • They also had a great presentation at TED, we can watch it later:) we have seen two examples for children, now let&apos;s talk about the elders.
  • they can drag and drop between  the screens
  • actually children and elders have something in common. For example, they may not familiar with computers. especially to elders, their eyesight is poor. they can&apos;t type keyboard on the phone, so sms, email is not work for them, but for us, we often use these things to communicate with each other
  • Patience
  • HCI’s 543

    1. 1. Human-Computer Interaction's 543 Yu-Hsuan Lin [email_address]
    2. 2. <ul><li>  </li></ul>5 Theories 4 Works 3 Self-studies
    3. 3. 5 Theories
    4. 4. Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
    5. 5. Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
    6. 6. Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
    7. 7. Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
    8. 8. Three Conceptual Models <ul><li>  </li></ul>From Norman, 1986.
    9. 10. Affordance Form Follows Function
    10. 11. Um, which door? <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    11. 13. Fitts' law
    12. 14. Tangible User Interface (TUI) v.s Graphic User Interface (GUI)
    13. 15.   Gestalt  Principle
    14. 16. Closure                       //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    15. 17. Closure                       //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    16. 18. Continuity                   //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    17. 19. Continuity                   //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    18. 20. Similarity                     //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    19. 21. Proximity                     //Gestalt Principle <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    20. 22. Embodiment by Fishkin, 2004
    21. 23. 4 Works
    22. 24. Marble Answering Machine <ul><li>by Durrell Bishop (1992) </li></ul>
    23. 25.  
    24. 26. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    25. 27. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    26. 28. Touch Projector <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    27. 29. iRis <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    28. 30. 3 Self-studies
    29. 31. TurnOver <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    30. 37. UbiComp final project 2011 Yu-Hsuan Lin [email_address]
    31. 39. Reference <ul><ul><li>The Design of Everyday Things by DA Normen, 1998 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>J. Mankoff , A.K. Dey , G. Hsieh , J. Kientz , S. Lederer , M. Ames. Heuristic evaluation of ambient displays, CHI '03, p.169--176. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kenneth P. Fishkin, A Taxonomy for and Analysis of Tangible Interfaces. Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (5), September 2004, 347-358. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marble Answering Machine   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>David Merrill , Jeevan Kalanithi , Pattie Maes, Siftables: towards sensor network user interfaces, Proceedings of the 1st international conference on Tangible and embedded interaction, February 15-17, 2007, Baton Rouge, Louisiana </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boring, S., Baur, D., Butz, A., Gustafson, S., and Baudisch, P., Touch Projector: Mobile Interaction Through Video, In Proceedings of CHI 2010, Atlanta, GA, April 10-15, 2009, pp. 2287-2296. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PhoneBook </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    32. 40. Thank You!
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