Plant & Microbe Interaction - plant roots
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mycorrhizae, hartig net, ectomycorrhizae, endomycorrhizae, epiphytic plants, rhizobium

mycorrhizae, hartig net, ectomycorrhizae, endomycorrhizae, epiphytic plants, rhizobium

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Plant & Microbe Interaction - plant roots Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Plant & Microbe Interaction b.stev plant roots
  • 2. THE “root” of 95% of plants have adapted fungal growth that enhances their survival KNOWN AS: mycorrhizae , it is a beneficial relationship for the fungus as the plant releases some sugars & amino acids from the process of photosynthesis (Wikipedia, 2008)
  • 3.
    • HOW this help’s the plant :
    • fungus metabolism, provides the plant with
    • phosphate that it can NOT absorb from soil
    • fungus creates a WEB like formation called:
    • a HARTIG NET around & between roots
    • - increases the absorbance: H 2 O/ nutrients
    • - more tolerant & competitive to environment
    • - increased resistance: > drought
    • > poor soil
    • > disease
    • > stresses
    • HARTIG NET : also structure / support to PLANT
    • “ litter layers ” : are formed that encourage the
    • production of enzymes – aids digestion of soil
  • 4. 2 TYPES of fungal growth on plant root/s :
    • THE growth either:
    • en-sheaths the root , the growth extends
    • into spaced areas of the root cortex ALSO.
    • KNOWN as: [ ectomycorrhizal ]
    (Wikipedia, 2008)
  • 5. cortex FUNGAL SHEATH FUNGAL SHEATH: between cortical cells epidermis section of a PLANT ROOT [ ecto mycorrhizae] (Campbell & Reece, 2005)
  • 6. epidermis cortex intra cellular hyphae extra cellular hyphae root hair section of a PLANT ROOT [ endo mycorrhizae] arbuscules (Campbell & Reece, 2005)
  • 7. EPIPHYTIC plant/s
    • DO NOT root in the soil.
    • attach to living plants, ie: tree
    • mosses
    • lichens
    • fungi
    • plants
    • trees
    • ferns
  • 8. DERIVE the physical support from their host & , NUTRIENTS derived from PHOTOSYNTHESIS overgrowth of an EPIPHYTIC PLANT can cause the host to be strangled &THEN replaces the HOST : (number of years) EXAMPLE: climbing plants OR crawlers (Wikipedia, 2008)
  • 9. RHIZOBIUM
    • a soil microbe that enters the root of plant/s
    • - both aerobic & anaerobic , produces enzymes
    • - stimulates abnormal growth of the root cells:
    • these form into , NODULES on the root
    METABOLISM of the microbe supplies nitrogen to the plant in a form the plant can then METABOLISE as a nutrient – this phenomenon is called: “ NITROGEN FIXING ROOT NODULE/S ” (Wikipedia, 2008)
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Bibliography Wikipedia. (2008). Rhizobia – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhizobia Campbell, N., & Reece, J. (2005). Biology (7 th ed.). San Fransisco: Benjamin Cummings Wikipedia. (2008). Mycorrhiza – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Mycorrhiza - 45k - Wikipedia. (2008). Epiphyte – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . Retrieved September 2, 2008, from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphyte – 30k -