3 d modeling (mac 2013)

684 views
596 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
684
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
144
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

3 d modeling (mac 2013)

  1. 1. 3D Character3D CharacterAnimationAnimationCharacter Animation ProcessDisediakan oleh:Noorazzahrawani Binti Abdul Rani (Mei 2013)
  2. 2. Character Animation ProcessCharacter Animation Process1. Basics of Character Design2. Modeling Characters3. Texturing Characters4. Rigging Characters5. Animating
  3. 3. Character Animation ProcessCharacter Animation Process1. Basics of Character DesignMaking choices;a. Both artistic and technical.b. To know your character’s personality.c. Communicate this personality visually.When designing (artistic aspect);Size, shape, color, texture, clothing and otheratt.Well-designed character (technical aspect); easy toanimate, making the animator’s job easier andmore creative.“When you pair a great design with a greatpersonality, the results can be wonderful.”
  4. 4. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design1. Approaching Design as an Artist2. Design Styles3. Designing a Character4. Finalizing Your Design
  5. 5. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design1. Approaching Design as an Artist• The Creative Process• Technical Considerations• Using Reference• Refining Your Design
  6. 6. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignThe Creative Process• Always starts with creative inspiration,then refined and developed into a fullcharacter design.• … a drawing or sculpture that describesthe character in detail so it can bemodeled digitally in 3D.• Avoid criticizing your work during thecreative process. Critique is important,but should happen during revision, notcreation.
  7. 7. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignThe Creative Process
  8. 8. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignThe Creative ProcessRough Sketch and Quick DrawRough Sketch and Quick Draw
  9. 9. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignThe Creative ProcessAction PosesAction Poses
  10. 10. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignTechnical Considerations• As you design, keep technical considerations in mind.Such;- specific number of poly- adding details for realistic look will create additionalwork, increasing production budget and extendingschedule.• A solid understanding of the technical issues involvedin 3D animation is gained through experience.• Ask a lot of questions of more experienced animators.• For your own initial projects, it’s best to keep yourdesigns simple so you don’t get bogged down intechnical problems.• Example: Simple hair took a few minutes to render.Clothing can be another big technical challenge.
  11. 11. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignUsing Reference• Nature or look at other design, art andfilm for inspiration.• If you’re designing a creature, you maywant to take a trip to the zoo to findanimals to use as reference.
  12. 12. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignUsing Reference
  13. 13. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignUsing Reference
  14. 14. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design
  15. 15. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignOnce you hit upon a good idea, refine it into conceptual art,which then needs to be refined further into a finalcharacter design.Redraw the charactermany times before itworks for the production.This is also the pointwhere you need to askWhether the design isfeasible in terms of budget andTechnical requirements.Refining Your Design
  16. 16. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignRefining Your Design
  17. 17. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design
  18. 18. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design2. Design Styles• Realistic Characters- … more difficult it will be to animate.- Audience will pick up on anything evenslightly “off” about a realistic human character.- Don’t bite off more than you can chew.• Stylized Characters- Designs caricature reality- Avoids some of the problems involved withrealism. If a character doesn’t look completelyphotorealistic, the audience will be morewilling to accept unrealistic movement and expression.(Example: Anime and Local Style)
  19. 19. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design2. Design Styles- A lot of anime/manga has a standardized style of drawingbased around simple lines with very little detail. If youpursuethis type of illustration you should practise conveying ideaswith minimum of pencil work, restricted to clear outlines.Even the shading, added at the colour stage, should besimple.
  20. 20. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design3. Designing a Character• Head and Body Proportions• Faces• Hands• Segmenting Characters- Mesh deformation is always a littleproblematic and can be resource-intensive, so sometimes breaking yourcharacter into manageable parts cansimplify the rigging and animationprocess.
  21. 21. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design3. Designing a Character- When creating alien creatures it is important toestablish a sense of scale. The most effectivemethod is to place them next to one of the principalcharacters. Simple sketches will be sufficient to actas a reminder.- Once the ideas are down on paper, the details haveto be worked on. Drawings should be made from asmany angles as possible, with a minimum of frontand profile views.- Draw lots of expression that are appropriate for thecharacter.
  22. 22. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design3. Designing a Character2D Model Sheet-Model sheet shows the character from different angles to show his proportion.-Exaggeration, both under-and over-, is a standard method used bycartoonists and animators to add personality to their creations.-Turnaround was especially useful when the character was converted to 3D.-Side views are important in creating a clear impression of the character’sappearance.BackBack FrontFront Side/ProfileSide/Profile
  23. 23. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design4. Finalizing Your Design• When creating drawings for modeling, you needto make sure they don’t cheat and are accurateto 3D. If not, translating that to 3D can bedifficult.• To model, need at least two orthographicviews: side and front, can be created usingdrawings, sculptures or photographs.• Side and front views of a character must line upprecisely once they’re scanned into the pc.• Top and back views can also be helpful forsome characters.
  24. 24. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character Design4. Finalizing Your DesignLeftLeft FrontFrontLegLegDetailsDetailsHandHandDetailsDetailsPose (Turnaround)Pose (Turnaround)
  25. 25. Basics of Character DesignBasics of Character DesignExercise 1In this exercise, you get to design a simple character.Take a pencil and paper, and sketch out some characterdesigns that you might want to model. These designsshould focus on the outward appearance of the characterand its proportions, and whether the character is small,large, skinny, fat and so on.Once you have a number of designs, look carefully ateach character and think of how it might be constructed inyour chosen software. Since you are just getting started,these issues may not be readily apparent. Your design maychange as you learn more about how to build characters.Find a design that you like, and create a set of technicaldrawings or photographs to get your character ready forthe modeling process.* Sketch final design of your character in the model sheet
  26. 26. Modeling CharactersModeling Characters1. Construct the Character using; surfacetypes:• Polygon modelling• Plane modelling• Edgeloops modelling technique2. Creating Characters• Anatomy• Flexibility• Facial Modeling• Final Assembly
  27. 27. 3. Segmenting characterMany characters are built using a singlemesh. Although this is natural way to createa character, it forces you to deform everypart of the mesh when you animate thecharacter.
  28. 28. 3. Segmenting characterMesh deformation is always a little problematicand can be resource-intensive, so sometimesbreaking your character into manageable partscan simplify the rigging and animation process.It’s very easy to design collars, clothing, andother accessories to help hide seams for yourcharacters.
  29. 29. 3. Segmenting character
  30. 30. 3. Segmenting character
  31. 31. 3. Segmenting characterSome characters are designed from theground up as segmented characters. Acharacter such as a robot would actually bebuilt with body parts as individual objects andmight not even need mesh deformation at thejoints. This makes the setup and rigging of thecharacter very straightforward.
  32. 32. Exercise 2:In this exercise, you can start modeling using box. Boxsuggested height is 3 segments, width is 3 segmentsand length is 3 segments. Convert the box intoeditablePoly object. Apply modifier Symmetry to haveother half of the box is being affected when you modelthe other half.Then you can proceed by extruding hand, leg and headusing Extrude, Cut, Connect and Weld tools. As youmodel the human body (by extruding, cutting,connecting and welding), making sure all horizontal andvertical edges are straight. Add more edgeloops aroundmaximum deformation area of the body or to get detailsof the body parts. * For head, you can model it as a separated part thenattach it to the body or extrude from the body.After that, you can apply modifier turbosmooth to seethe human body mesh become smooth to get the bestform of human body.
  33. 33. Poly ModelingPoly ModelingObjects and Sub-Objects:
  34. 34. EditablePoly in 3ds Max
  35. 35. Cloth ModellingCloth Modelling
  36. 36. ReferencesReferencesMaestri, G. Digital Character Animation 3. 2006,New Riders. Berkeley.Patmore, C. Character Design Studio. 2005, PageOne Publishing Private Limited. Singapore.

×