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Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics
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Lesson 1 Ship Characteristics

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    • 1. NS100 Ship Characteristics
    • 2. Objectives: <ul><li>1. Be familiar with basic ship structure </li></ul><ul><li>definitions. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand shipboard compartmentation, terminology, and watertight integrity. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Demonstrate an understanding of the different material conditions of readiness. </li></ul>
    • 3.  
    • 4. Ship Structure Definitions Hull - The main body of the ship. Shell Plating - The sides of the hull. Bilge - Intersection of side plating and bottom plating. Keel - Backbone of the ship.
    • 5.  
    • 6. Ship Structure Definitions Frames - Fastened to the keel, running athwartships. Support the skin. Main Deck - Uppermost continuous deck from bow to stern. Levels - Similar to decks, located above the main deck.
    • 7. Ship Structure Definitions Decks - “Floors” aboard ship. Bulkheads - “Walls”. Overheads - “Ceilings”. Compartments - “Rooms”. Bounded by overheads, bulkheads and decks.
    • 8.  
    • 9. Hull Reference Terms <ul><li>Trim- The relationship between fore and aft draft. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In trim” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ down by the bow” or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ down by the stern.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>List - The athwartships balance </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Starboard list </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Port list </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>61
    • 10. Hull Reference Terms Ballast - Weight added to lower part of ship to help keep her in balance. Either permanent or controllable (ballast tanks). Propeller guards
    • 11. Compartment and Deck Numbering Every compartment aboard a ship is given an identifying alphanumeric symbol which is marked on a label plate on or near the entrance. For example: 3-75-4-M
    • 12. 3-75-4-M <ul><li>3 - Third deck. </li></ul><ul><li>75- The compartments forward boundary is on or immediately aft of ship’s frame 75. </li></ul><ul><li>4 -The second compartment outboard of the centerline to port (even numbers to port, odd to starboard). </li></ul><ul><li>M- the compartment is used for ammunition. </li></ul>
    • 13. 01-75-0-F <ul><li>01 - First level. </li></ul><ul><li>75- The compartments forward boundary is on or immediately aft of ship’s frame 75. </li></ul><ul><li>0 -The compartment on the centerline. </li></ul><ul><li>F- the compartment is a fuel tank. </li></ul>
    • 14. Compartment Numbering E - engineering DC – damage control F - fuel J- JP5 C - ship control (bridge,CIC) L - living spaces M - ammunition spaces Q - spaces not otherwise designated V - voids
    • 15.  
    • 16.  
    • 17. Shipboard Compartmentation and Watertight Integrity A ship’s structure is divided into many watertight compartments in order to maximize damage control readiness.
    • 18. Material Conditions of Readiness X-ray - Least protective condition Yoke - at sea and in port after working hours Zebra - General Quarters. Circle X-ray, Circle Yoke, Circle Zebra -closed when not in use. Dog Zebra - Zebra, also secured during “darken ship” condition. William - open. Maintenance and system isolation.
    • 19. secured – Condition X-ray secured – Condition Yoke secured – Condition Zebra closed when not in use
    • 20. secured - “darken ship” condition always open secured - Chemical, Biological, and Radiological (CBR) attack.
    • 21. Material Conditions of Readiness Circle William - Normally kept open, secured for protection against Chemical, Biological, and Radiological (CBR) attack.
    • 22. Review Questions 1. What is the difference between a deck and a level? 2. What is the number of the main deck? 3. When is material condition Yoke set throughout the ship? 4. Besides general quarters, when is material condition Zebra set throughout the ship? 5. What do Circle William fittings protect against?
    • 23. Review Questions 6. What are Dog Zebra fittings designed to do? 7. What is the difference between list and trim? 8. If you were told, “Ensign, go to compartment 6-132-0-E to get a HT ( USN - Hull Maintenance Technician ) punch,” where would you go?

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