LTPS NTO Danielson Presentation
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LTPS NTO Danielson Presentation

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  • 8:00 – 8:15 slides 2-4Teaching matters, it matters a lot, in fact teacher quality matters more than any other factor within the school’s control. Teacher Quality matters more than class sizeTeacher Quality matters more than ethnicity Teacher Quality matters more than family incomeTeacher Quality matters more than the facility the students attend and …Teacher Quality matters more than who the principal is.
  • Read slide (with feeling)And while most states have state standards for teaching they are usually large and aspirational; they lay out, in very broad brush-strokes, what constitutes good teaching.Such statements of practice are important for policy-makers as they design pre-service programs, or assessment systems for licensing beginning teachers.However, as a guide for practitioners, they don't (and can't) specifically describe practice. For such purposes, greater detail is needed, detail that is consistent with, and that elaborates, the ideas in the states standards. NOTE: Refer to state standards here if you wish.
  • The Framework for Teaching is a more detailed description and elaboration of the standards.  I’m reminded of the story of a young teacher who was doing a science unit on bouncy and density. To have them engage in the learning she had the students push their desks together in groups of four. Each group had a pan of water in the middle of the table, and they were using clay to construct clay boats. Their goal was to construct the boat that could carry the most cargo (in the form of paper clips) before it would sink. So, the students were all up on the knees and leaning in and having conversations about the (what I call “butts up learning”) the principal comes to the door-looks in and says, “I’ll come back when you’re teaching.” Clearly this principal and this teacher didn’t even agree on what teaching was let alone what good teaching was---and that teacher, by the way, was Charlotte Danielson, whose Framework for Teaching we are here to discuss today. So, let’s take a look at our plan for today to study her work. In the example above there were not mutually agreed upon standards of appropriate teaching. 
  • Go over the goals as necessary and point out which ones might be particularly important to your group. Note: the last goal. Emphasize that the framework is not just a tool for evaluation, but also as a tool for teacher growth. You may want to use the “Shift” handout here if time permits. Highlight the last bullet to emphasize the connection to the non traditional teachers
  • 8:30 – 9:15Slides 14 - 19Materials:Small post it notesChart paperMarkers
  • 5 minWe talk a lot about what students need to know and be able to do. I’m going to ask you to focus on what teachers need to know and be able to do in order to help students learn.
  • 10 Min for sharing5 minutes for videoModel how they will use Worksheet  Give them about 10 minutes to walk around the room then ask them to return to their seats  Explain that since the “real” Charlotte Danielson is not here-we’ll take advantage of a video of her talking about the framework for teachingNOTE: Video from TeachScape or ASCD should be used here. After the video: ask for people to brainstorm additional ideas
  • Point out that likely the ideas they talked about on their post its can all go under one of these domains  Draw the graphic on a piece of chart paper and highlight key ideas about each domain Think of Domain 2 and 3 as on stage and Domain 1 and 4 as off stage Have them refer to this paper in their packet
  • 5 Minutes with next slideAbove is an example of how the each domain is broken down into components and further detail included in the elements
  • Show people the breakdown from Domain-Component-ElementDiscuss the connection between the different domains
  • 9:15 – 10:00 Slides 20-2645 Minutes to complete the Jigsaw of the Domains10 minutes to read5 minutes for each group to report out to the others10 minute discussion (common themes and connection to McCrel data)
  • 35 Minutes to complete the Jigsaw of the Domains10 minutes to read5 minutes for each group to report out to the others
  • Refer in packet to pages 26-31 of Danielson’s Framework, the four domain summaries making sure about ¼ of the class get each domain. You will have to alter the directions for this activity depending on the number of participants at each table. For example, with 8 at the table you can easily do elbow partners. Alternatively you could number participants off 1,2,3,4, and have them get in groups. However, keep the groups small-not more than six usually works best. Instruct participants to use p. 4 in their work book for a summary and to use p. 5. to take notes when others present
  • At this point note that 3c: is the heart of the framework for teaching-talk a little bit about “minds on” as opposed to “time on task”   Have some groups report out about discussions, rotate reporting groups throughout the day. Not all groups have to report out
  • The above are the common themes that are found in Danielson’s Framework
  • 10:10 – 10:50Slides 28-34
  • Each group will receive a set of 3-4 color coded cards with examples from each Domain. For example, table one examples 1-4, table two examples 5-8,Table three examples 9-12. You may need more than one set if you have a large group.
  • Point out there are 4 colors—therefore 4 domains—quickly figure out which domain belong with which colorAs the facilitator, write this on a piece of chart paper in the front of the roomDomain 1 Yellow  Domain 2 Blue Domain 3 Pink Domain 4 Green 
  • Point out to them that in their handout packet they have a placemat that has not only all four domains and components, but also the elements. If time permits they should go to the element level. This is a trainer decision. If you don’t feel there is time, just have them go to the component level.
  • 15 minutesGroups should be directed to decide which component and element each example represents and then place a post it® on the card to indicate their decision.  
  • 15 minEach team member takes a Domain and joins an expert Domain  Expert Domain leader goes over answers and checks answers for accuracy. 
  • 12:50 – 1:50 Slides 43-4960 minutes total5 minute explanation of levels15 minutes to review and highlight10 minutes report out and identify commonalities 5 minute explanation of Assessing Evidence20 Assessing Evidence5 Min review
  • Go over the levels of performance “in general”  Point out the key ideas from each level of performance: you might want to use the swimming analogy:  The teacher at the Unsatisfactory level could be compared to a non-swimmer who has been thrown in deep water and is drowning.  The swimmer who can manage the dog paddle, but nothing else, is similar to the teacher performing at the Basic level; the swimmer can get across the lake but may be swamped if any waves come up.  A swimmer with command of a number of different strokes, and the knowledge of when to use which, is similar to a teacher performing at the Proficient level.  And a competitive swimmer who is perfecting her strokes, or a swimming teacher, would be the equivalent ( or is the life saver-or can walk on water)
  • Pass out the four rubrics summaries making sure about ¼ of the class get each domain. You will have to alter the directions for this activity depending on the number of participants at each table. For example, with 8 at the table you can easily do elbow partners. Alternatively you could number participants off 1,2,3,4, and have them get in groups. However, keep the groups small-not more than six usually works best. Instruct participants to use p. 4 in their work book for a summary and to use p. 5. to take notes when others present
  • Keep pointing out that we are talking about the teaching not the teacher. Identify differences between Danielson terminology and the LTPS categories
  • 2:45 – 3:00 Refer to evaluation

LTPS NTO Danielson Presentation LTPS NTO Danielson Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Teacher Evaluation in Lawrence Stay focused on the focus Andrew Zuckerman @azuck1 August 26, 2013 http://goo.gl/YBX3v3 1 Created for the use of Lawrence Township Public Schools
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  • Teacher Quality… • ....“is the single most important factor in a student’s achievement” Linda Darling Hammond 4
  • We are Good…. but, • How good is good enough? • Good enough at what? • How do we know? • Who decides 5
  • Teaching Standards • Mutually agreed upon descriptions of behaviors that, if done repeatedly and in combination with each other, cause LEARNING to happen 6
  • Outcomes for All Participants By the end of the trainings, you will be able to: • Demonstrate your knowledge of the domains in Danielson’s Framework for Teaching by connecting classroom examples to the appropriate domain • Explain the levels of performance and their use in assessment of and reflection on professional practice. • Understand the use of Danielson’s Framework for Teaching in your setting (teacher, counselor, CST, etc) 7
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  • The Wisdom of Practice • If you were to walk into a classroom, what might you see or hear there (from the students as well as the teacher) that would cause you to think that you were in the presence of an expert? • What would make you think “Oh, this is good, if I had a child this age, this is the class I would hope for.” 10
  • The Wisdom of Practice • Brainstorm 3-4 ideas- one idea on a piece of paper • Get up, find a partner from another table ▫ Introduce yourselves (if you don’t know one another) ▫ Find another partner from another table ▫ Continue until you have 10-12 ideas • Charlotte Danielson’s A Framework for Teaching 11
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  • Framework • Domain ▫ Component  Elements • Domain 1- Planning and Preparation ▫ Component 1a- Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy  Element- Knowledge of prerequisite relationships 13
  • Plan TEACHApply Reflect 14
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  • The Domains • Domain 1: Planning and Preparation • Domain 2: The classroom Environment • Domain 3: Instruction • Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities 16
  • With your “elbow” table partner • Each pair takes one of the domains • Read over the description on your handout • Highlight key words • Be prepared to discuss the reviewed domain with the group 17
  • Consider… • Is one of the domains more important than the other? Why? • Is one of the domains of particular importance to beginning teachers? Explain • Do teachers perform the tasks described in the domains in any particular sequence within a domain or overall? If so, what is that sequence? 18
  • What are some common themes you have identified in your discussions? • 5 Minute Table Discussion ▫ Think about the common themes 19
  • Common Themes • Equity • Cultural Sensitivity • High Expectations • Developmental Appropriateness • Accommodating Individual Needs • Appropriate use of Technology • Student Assumption of Responsibility 20
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  • Card Sort-Domains • Quickly look over the cards you have been given • Note that the cards are color coded and one color represents each of the 4 domains • As a group, assign a domain to each color (note words which will give you hints) • When everyone is finished, share with the whole group 22
  • The Domains • Domain 1: Planning and Preparation • Domain 2: The classroom Environment • Domain 3: Instruction • Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities 23
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  • Card Sort Directions • For each card ▫ For each card, determine its domain, component, and element ▫ Write this information on a sticky note and place on each card (Example: 2a: Respect and Rapport- student to teacher) 25
  • Card Sort- expert group • At the direction of your facilitator, put the cards back together in Domain Groups • Partners take a set of cards from one Domain • Proceed to the expert table designated by the facilitator. • Read your examples to the group • Check your answers with the answer key 26
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  • • Unsatisfactory: Teaching shows evidence of not understanding the concepts underlying the component ▫ May represent practice that requires intervention • Basic: Teaching shows evidence of knowledge and skills related to teaching- but inconsistent performance due to lack of experience 28
  • • Proficient: Teaching shows evidence of thorough knowledge of all aspects of the profession. Students are engaged in learning. This is successful, accomplished, professional, and effective teaching. • Distinguished: Classroom functions as a community of learners with student assumption of responsibility for learning 29
  • With your “elbow” table partner • Each pair takes the rubric for one of the domains • Read over the assigned rubric in your handout • Highlight key words • Be prepared to make a short presentation to your group on the rubric for your domain 30
  • Levels of Performance Unsatisfactory Basic Proficient Distinguished Not No Not clear Unaware Does not respond Poor Not Congruent Some Attempts to Limited Moderate Uneven Inconsistent Rudimentary Consistent High quality Timely Accurate Appropriate Clear Effective High Expectations All students Highly effective Entirely appropriate Adapted for individual students Fully aligned Extensive 31
  • Assessing Evidence • Equally distribute the words provided to your group • Place the word(s) in the category that you think it falls under ▫ Developing, Proficient, Accomplished, & Distinguished  Refer to handout or the descriptions of the levels of performance on pages 41 and 42 in Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching 32
  • Questions to Ponder • Can a teacher demonstrate different levels of performance within one component? ▫ Can you give an example? • Consider one pair of behaviors that express different degrees or different types. How might the evidence change at different levels of performance? ▫ I.e. Why is a distinction made between a teacher making global suggestions and a teacher making specific suggestions about strategies to improve a lesson? 33
  • Evaluation • Please complete the evaluation with the remaining time. 34