• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Agile UX, Yes We Can!
 

Agile UX, Yes We Can!

on

  • 6,616 views

This presentation clearly defines the difference between agile principles and practices and the role of the ux practitioner within this process.

This presentation clearly defines the difference between agile principles and practices and the role of the ux practitioner within this process.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,616
Views on SlideShare
6,511
Embed Views
105

Actions

Likes
19
Downloads
185
Comments
1

3 Embeds 105

http://fcux.posterous.com 73
http://www.slideshare.net 31
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Great deck Alla!

    I just presented a talk on best practices for UX-agile integration a couple of weeks ago: http://slidesha.re/b5tdE7. Seems like you're advocating a similar approach based on your experience. Very cool.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Hello, my name is Alla Zollers and I am experience designer at Mad*Pow. Mad*Pow is a great experience design agency working with a number of clients across a variety of industries. I am here today because I have been quietly practicing agile ux for the last two years, recently, as the popularity of agile has increased, so has the amount of confusion and occasional negativity towards agile from the ux community. My goals for tonight are three fold: 1) Get everyone on the same page by establishing a baseline understanding of agile principles and practices; 2) Provide practical techniques for working in agile; 3) Directly addressing some of the emotional aspects around transitioning to a new methodology. As we I go through these slides, I want everyone to notice how much overlap exists between existing UCD principles and agile principles.
  • I broke my talk up into 3 parts, I will stop to answer questions at the end of each section. So let’s all establish a baseline understanding of agile. Here I present the educational portion of our program.
  • Heavyweight methods were perceived to be bureaucratic, Dilbertesque, slow, demeaning, and inconsistent with the ways that software developers actually perform effective work. The functioning principles of Agile can be found in lean manufacturing (Toyota 1950s) and six sigma. These concepts include error proofing, eliminating waste, creating flow, adding customer value, and empowering workers. The concepts were first formally espoused in the 14 principles of the Toyota Way, and the two pillars of the Toyota Production System (Just-in-time and smart automation).
  • The developers that came up with the agile philosophy wanted to work in a better work environment
  • In order to achieve a new type of work environment where everyone was treated as a person, not an asset, the first thing that needed to change was the mindset. In 2001, 17 prominent figures in the field of agile development created the Agile manifesto, and formed the Agile Alliance. Teamwork is at the heart of every agile process, think in terms of skills, not roles. There is no “my work” and “your work”, there is only “our work”. Answer the question “Who is responsible for …” with “the team”
  • Customers mean something different in agile, a customer is not someone who is external to the product team who purchases or uses the product. A customer is a role filled by one or more members of the product team, whose duties include acting as the voice of the end-use for the development team, and helping to prioritize and plan.
  • When starting out in agile, it is often recommended that you follow established practices until you feel comfortable with the new process. Then begin to change things based on feedback from the team, the organizational culture, and goals. Work to continuously improve and refine the process. A team that is agile is never complacent and stagnant.
  • It is difficult to internalize and truly understand agile practices without having actually gone through a few iterations and truly performed them. However, I would like to highlight some of the unique practices that take place on a regular basis in an agile environment, and how those practices directly support the agile principles.
  • At the core, agile really is about the people. Design quality, learning and training, overcoming difficult problems, improved morale, decreased management risk, increased discipline and better time management, resilient flow, fewer interruptions
  • As a [Persona] I would like to ____ so that I can ___ Have conversations
  • Customers mean something different in agile, a customer is not someone who is external to the product team who purchases or uses the product. A customer is a role filled by one or more members of the product team, whose duties include acting as the voice of the end-use for the development team, and helping to prioritize and plan.
  • Daily meetings where everyone reports on their progress and most important lets everyone know of their impediments
  • Both within the code and with end-users. Continuous feedback is a key component of agile.
  • At the end of every iteration and release, the entire team gets together to understand what has went well, what didn’t go well, and what can be improved. This promotes continuous improvement.
  • In Waterfall, each stage waits for the one previously to be finished and all documentation to be handed off. In Agile, multiple stages are going on simultaneously and in smaller chunks.
  • The value propositions come directly from the originators desire to be treated like people within an organization vs an asset
  • Barriers get broken down, there is a blurring of roles and lots of knowledge exchange. Developers get a better sense for design, designers get a greater appreciation of code. This is where trust and mutual respect between people gets developed within an organization. Agile is truly all about the people, and that can be a double-edged sword.
  • You don’t do agile because its more efficient, or a fad, you do it because it’s different and what you have been doing is not working
  • The next step is to understand how to be a ux practitioner in an agile environment
  • The cadence or rhythm of an agile project might at first feel really rushed or uncomfortable. However, its there to promote a sustainable pace and will soon become second nature.
  • The next step is to understand how to be a ux practitioner in an agile environment

Agile UX, Yes We Can! Agile UX, Yes We Can! Presentation Transcript