C1h1

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C1h1

  1. 1. PN. AZLIROZITA BT ARIFIN 019-9262072
  2. 2. LECTURE : 19 weeks ( 17 / 05 – 08 / 10 / 10 ) TOPIC : 16 topics UPS : 19 / 07 ( topic 1 – 4 ) FINAL EXAM SEM 1 : 18 / 10 / 10
  3. 3. Subject Evaluation : <ul><li>Course works …30% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tutorial & Quiz (10%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practical works (10%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mid-semester Test (10%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Final Examination …70% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Paper 1 40 marks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paper 2 90 marks </li></ul></ul><ul><li> 130 marks </li></ul>
  4. 4. Fail 0.00 F 0 – 34 Pass 1.00 D 35 – 39 Pass 1.33 D+ 40 – 44 Pass 1.67 C- 45 – 49 Pass 2.00 C 50 – 54 Pass 2.33 C+ 55 – 59 Credit 2.67 B- 60 – 64 Credit 3.00 B 65 – 69 Excellent 3.33 B+ 70 – 74 Excellent 3.67 A- 75 – 79 Excellent 4.00 A 80 – 100 Status Point Grade Range of marks(%)
  5. 5. REFERENCE BOOK : <ul><li>James S. Walker(2007), “Physics”, 3 rd Edition, Pearson International Edition, ISBN 0-13-227019-6. (Recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>Douglas C. Giancoli(2000), “Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics”, 3 rd Edition, Prentice Hall International, ISBN 0-13-017976-0. (Recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>Hugh D. Young & Roger A. Freedman(2004), “University Physics with Modern Physics”, 11 th Edition, Pearson Education, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-8053-8684-X (Recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>Raymond A. Serway & John W. Jewett,Jr.(2004), “Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics”, 6 th Edition, Thomson Brooks/cole. (Recommended) </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Poh Liong Yong & S. Nagappan, “Physics for Matriculation Semester 1”,Fajar Bakti sdn. Bhd.,ISBN 967 65 8638 2 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Oxford Dictionary of Physics”,4th Edition(2004), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280103-1(Recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>Raymond A. Serway & Faughn(2004),”College Physics”, 6th Edition,Thomson Brooks/cole. </li></ul><ul><li>Raymond A. Serway & Robert J. Beichner(2000),” Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics”,5th Edition,Harcourt College Publishers,ISBN 0-03-022657-0 </li></ul><ul><li>And Etc… </li></ul>
  7. 7. CHAPTER 1: Physical quantities and measurements (5 Hours)
  8. 8. PHYSICAL QUANTITIES & MEASUREMENT PHYSICAL QUANTITIES DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS SCALARS & VECTORS
  9. 9. PHYSICAL QUANTITIES Derived quantities Unit prefixes Unit conversion Basic quantities
  10. 10. <ul><li>At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>State basic quantities and their respective SI units and symbols : length (m), time (s), mass (kg), electrical current (A), temperature (K), amount of substance (mol) and luminosity (cd). </li></ul><ul><li>State derived quantities and their respective units and symbols: velocity (m s -1 ), acceleration (m s -2 ), work (J), force (N), pressure (Pa), energy (J), power (W) and frequency (Hz). </li></ul><ul><li>Perform conversion between SI and British units. </li></ul>Learning Outcome:
  11. 11. quantity which can be measured PHYSICAL QUANTITIES Derived quantities Basic quantities
  12. 12. quantity which cannot be derived from any physical quantities Basic quantities cd candela Luminous Intensity mol mole N Amount of substance A ampere I Electric current K kelvin T/  Temperature s second t Time kg kilogram m Mass m metre l Length Symbol SI Unit Symbol Quantity
  13. 13. quantity which can be measured quantity which cannot be derived from any physical quantities PHYSICAL QUANTITIES Derived quantities Basic quantities
  14. 14. quantity which can be expressed in term of base quantity some examples of derived quantity Derived quantities kg m 2 s -2 @ J F  s W Work kg m s -2 @ N m  a F Force kg m s -1 m  v p <ul><ul><li>Momentum </li></ul></ul>kg m -3 m/V  Density m s -2 v/t a Acceleration M 3 l  w  t V Volume m s -1 s/t v Velocity Unit Formulae Symbol Derived quantity
  15. 15. quantity which can be measured quantity which cannot be derived from any physical quantities - eg : ? quantity which can be expressed in term of base quantity - eg : ? PHYSICAL QUANTITIES Derived quantities Basic quantities
  16. 16. PHYSICAL QUANTITIES Derived quantities Unit prefixes Unit conversion Basic quantities
  17. 17. for presenting larger and smaller values Unit prefixes p  10  12 pico n  10  9 nano   10  6 micro m  10  3 milli c  10  2 centi d  10  1 deci k  10 3 kilo M  10 6 mega G  10 9 giga T  10 12 tera Symbol Multiple Prefix
  18. 18. <ul><li>Table shows the conversion factors between SI and British units for length and mass </li></ul>Conversion of unit 1 angstrom ( Å) = 10  10 m 1 kg = 0.0685 slug 1 mi = 5280 ft = 1.609 km 1 lb = 0.453 592 kg 1 km = 0.621 mi 1 slug = 14.59 kg 1 in = 2.54 cm 1 kg = 10 3 g 1 m = 39.37 in = 3.281 ft Mass Length
  19. 19. <ul><li>Solve the following problems of unit conversion. </li></ul><ul><li>a. 15 mm 2 = ? m 2 b. 65 km h  1 = ? m s  1 </li></ul><ul><li>c. 450 g cm  3 = ? kg m  3 d. 29 cm = ? in </li></ul><ul><li>e. 12 mi h  1 = ? m s  1 </li></ul><ul><li>Solution : </li></ul><ul><li>a. 15 mm 2 = ? m 2 </li></ul><ul><li>b. 65 km h -1 = ? m s -1 </li></ul><ul><li>1 st method : </li></ul>Example 1.1 :
  20. 20. <ul><li>2 nd method : </li></ul><ul><li>c. 450 g cm -3 = ? kg m -3 </li></ul>
  21. 21. d. 29 cm = ? in e. 12 mi h -1 = ? m s -1
  22. 22. <ul><li>At the end of this chapter, students should be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>State basic quantities and their respective SI units and symbols: length (m), time (s), mass (kg), electrical current (A), temperature (K), amount of substance (mol) and luminosity (cd). </li></ul><ul><li>State derived quantities and their respective units and symbols: velocity (m s -1 ), acceleration (m s -2 ), work (J), force (N), pressure (Pa), energy (J), power (W) and frequency (Hz). </li></ul><ul><li>Perform conversion between SI and British units. </li></ul>Learning Outcome:
  23. 23. Real-world implications One example of the importance of agreed units is the failure of the NASA Mars Climate Orbiter , which was accidentally destroyed on a mission to the planet Mars in September 1999 instead of entering orbit , due to miscommunications about the value of forces: different computer programs used different units of measurement ( newton versus pound force ). Enormous amounts of effort, time, and money were wasted
  24. 24. Real-world implications On April 15, 1999 Korean Air cargo flight 6316 from Shanghai to Seoul was lost due to the crew confusing tower instructions (in metres) and altimeter readings (in feet). Three crew and five people on the ground were killed. Thirty seven were injured.
  25. 25. Real-world implications In 1983, a Boeing 767 (which came to be know as the Gimli Glider ) ran out of fuel in mid-flight because of two mistakes in figuring the fuel supply of Air Canada 's first aircraft to use metric measurements.This accident is apparently the result of confusion both due to the simultaneous use of metric & Imperial measures as well as mass & volume measures.
  26. 26. PHYSICAL QUANTITIES & MEASUREMENT PHYSICAL QUANTITIES DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS SCALARS & VECTORS
  27. 27. thank you

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