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Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
Engaging older adults as untapped resources   04-2011 - ch
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Engaging older adults as untapped resources 04-2011 - ch

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  • TRAINER #2“COA” = Came of AgeMillennials – only are listing those 18 and older; LL specifiesMillennials are from 1981 - 2000
  • Transcript

    • 1. Engaging Older Adults as Untapped Resources<br />First in the Series of Educational Forums:<br />Creating Arizona as a <br />Great Place to Grow Older<br />
    • 2. Marc FreedmanFounderCivic Ventures<br />The Big Shift: <br />Navigating the New Stage Beyond Midlife<br />
    • 3. Carol Kratz Program Director Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust<br />The Boomer Solution: <br />Skilled Talent to Meet Nonprofit Needs<br />
    • 4. Elementsof Successful Aging<br />1. Prevention of disease and disability<br />2. Attainment of peak physical and psychological functioning<br />3. Participation in rewarding and productive activities<br />Successful Aging, Rowe and Kahn, 1998<br />
    • 5.
    • 6. Productive Aging<br />More seniors - boomers<br />Healthier, living longer<br />Educated<br />More financially Prepared<br />What next?<br />
    • 7. Piper Trust Investments <br />
    • 8. Potential Contributions of Professional and Leadership Volunteers<br />Professional advice and/or assistance that you can’t afford or that is not provided by your Board members <br />Examples include: legal, accounting, marketing, public relations, grant writing, evaluation, and community outreach<br />8<br />
    • 9. New Ways of Engaging<br />Design ladders of engagement that offer a variety of flexible and meaningful opportunities from the boiler room to the board room, such as:<br />Leadership- and professional-level roles as well as direct service<br />Bridge jobs<br />Internships<br />Short-term consulting projects<br />Self-directed team projects<br />
    • 10. What Does This Mean for Non-Profits?<br />Creating a menu of unpaid and paid opportunities <br />Tailoring marketing and recruitment strategies<br />Finding the right fit-balancing organizational needs with individual interests<br />Supporting and empowering an expanded workforce rather than top-down management<br />
    • 11. “Methods of Significant Service” Benefits to Nonprofits in One Year<br /><ul><li>Ten Maricopa County projects tracked 55+ volunteers in professional- and leadership-level roles over one year.
    • 12. Calculated the value and return on investment using the Strategic Metrics and Results Tracking (SMART) tool.</li></ul>The value of the leadership volunteers’ work: $ 1,340,000<br />The investment for the programs by 10 nonprofits: $ 218,380<br />The return on investment: $ 1,121,620<br />
    • 13. Success in the Trenches: Using Older Adults to Expand Organizational Capacity<br />Linda Llewellyn, BSW, CAVS<br /> Director Network Volunteer Services, John C. Lincoln Health Network <br />SunneeO’Rork<br /> Executive Director, Arizona Museum for Youth<br />Michelle Dionisio<br /> President and CEO, Benevilla<br />
    • 14. Linda Llewellyn Director Network Volunteer Services <br />John C. Lincoln Health Network<br />
    • 15. John C. Lincoln Health Network<br /><ul><li> North Mountain Hospital & Trauma Center
    • 16. Deer Valley Hospital & Mendy’s Place
    • 17. Anthem Urgent Care
    • 18. Physician Practices
    • 19. Outpatient Radiology Centers
    • 20. Adult Day Health Care
    • 21. Desert Mission Programs:</li></ul>Food Bank, Community Health Center, Children’s Dental Clinic, Lincoln Learning Center, Marley House, Neighborhood Renewal<br />
    • 22. Mission Critical Roles<br />North Mountain Auxiliary – fundraising/leadership<br />Information Desks/Public Areas<br />Courtesy Van<br />Spiritual Support<br />Friendly Visitor<br />Specialty Projects/Committees<br />Teaching new volunteer orientation<br />Handicraft items<br />Scholarship Program<br />
    • 23. Impact<br />Financial - $126,575 in grants to network<br />Taking initiative on projects/services and ensuring outcomes<br />Positive, comforting first impression that gives confidence<br />Provide staffing during weekdays<br />Dependable, Reliable, Commitment and Tenure<br />Provide best training for new volunteers & serve as role model<br />Experienced and safe-driving record <br />Lifelong communication skills, life experiences & hospital experiences provide for enhanced support, visits & interactions<br />Developed comprehensive network handbook for new volunteers<br />Assist in teaching new volunteer orientation w/ real examples & stories<br />Add a personalized touch to the experience<br />Awarded $32,600 in heathcare scholarships<br />
    • 24. Michelle DionisioPresident and CEO<br />Benevilla<br />
    • 25. Volunteers Truly Are the Foundation of Benevilla<br />In mid-2011, the number of volunteers contributing time to the organization has hit an all-time high of 561. <br />That army of volunteers extends the reach of each one paid staff member by 5.5 additional people and enables us to provide over 30,000 hours of service in the community.<br />Last year alone, the value of the volunteer contribution was $605,758.<br />
    • 26. Volunteers Offer Diverse Interests, Diverse Talents<br />As community needs change, both our services and our volunteers have changed. <br />Roles are being created that better suit the Boomer need to make a meaningful contribution and which provide opportunities for all ages, abilities and area of expertise. <br />
    • 27. Keys to Building a Strong Volunteer Base<br /><ul><li> Invest in the right leadership for the program and make it organization-wide
    • 28. A strong staff member is dedicated to skillfully interviewing, tailoring opportunities and managing volunteers.
    • 29. The entire staff is encouraged to act as ambassadors in growing current and recruiting new volunteers.
    • 30. Recognize and honor volunteers for their efforts
    • 31. The agency works with other community organizations to acknowledge volunteers through tokens such as free baseball tickets
    • 32. Regular quarterly staff and volunteer meetings are held to recognize contributions and build involvement
    • 33. An annual Volunteer Recognition event is held to recognize length service and to award the Volunteer of the Year award</li></li></ul><li>SunneeO’Rork Executive Director <br />Arizona Museum for Youth<br />
    • 34. <ul><li>John and Jack Whiteman Founders
    • 35. Original Children’s Museum Focused on Art
    • 36. 1st Children’s Museum in Arizona
    • 37. Partnership with City of Mesa in 1987
    • 38. Mission: To inspire children of all ages to experience their world differently through art, creativity and imagination.</li></li></ul><li>Mesa Arts & Culture Departments:<br />Boomer Volunteers<br />Ubuntu Project: 3 Ability Experts<br />Stipend Volunteers- M.M.S.S. <br /><ul><li>Mesa Arts Center, Arizona Museum of Natural History and Arizona Museum for Youth
    • 39. Vicky Bundy- Technology
    • 40. Karen Sherman –Evaluation & Way Finding
    • 41. Now- Museum Accounting Specialist and
    • 42. AMY Board Member</li></li></ul><li>OutComes<br />New Volunteer Program: $134,000 savings and hours for Gallery Educators and other staff <br />Partnerships:<br /><ul><li>AgeWorks
    • 43. Americorps Vista - Exhibition Assistant, </li></ul> 3 Gallery Educators <br /><ul><li>National Charity League, Phoenix Hands On
    • 44. Second-Wind Mesa United Way </li></li></ul><li>Nora Hannah Chief Consortium Officer Experience Matters<br />Expanded Opportunities for Funders to <br />Support Connecting People to Social Purpose<br />
    • 45. 26<br />2. The agency assesses its financial resources and finds them deficient.<br />3. The leadership (ED/board) assumes volunteers’ free labor requires little financial/ strategic investment.<br />1. The nonprofit recognizes it needs assistance to achieve its mission.<br />The Cycle of Poorly Managed<br />Volunteer Engagement<br />4. The organization issues a call and finds volunteer(s) who may or may not be qualified for the task.<br />6. When the effort achieves little, volunteers receive the blame and are approached with skepticism, if at all, the next time their service is required.<br />5. A staff person may oversee the volunteer effort, but expectations, accountability, & communication remain unclear.<br />
    • 46. Traditionalists<br />Boomers<br />Gen X<br />Millennials<br />
    • 47. Comparison of Volunteer Characteristics<br />28<br />Drivers<br />Boomer<br />Traditional<br />Civic Duty<br />Time<br />Administrative<br />Socializing<br />Routine<br />Participation<br />Well meaning<br />Rules oriented<br />Local community<br />Status quo<br />Make a positive difference<br />Expertise, skill<br />Projects, team based<br />Adding value<br />Challenge<br />Value-added contribution<br />Progressive<br />Change Agent<br />Network-wide<br />Forward<br />Community<br />Contribution<br />Assignment<br />Incentive<br />Energy<br />Preference<br />Personality<br />Engagement<br />Reach<br />Direction<br />
    • 48. Traditional<br />Boomers<br />Volunteer Skills & Expertise<br />Leadership <br />Consulting<br />Organization Management<br />Business Process Re-engineering<br />Statistical Analysis<br />Technical, computer<br />Training<br />Financial<br />Corporate fund raising<br />Specialist<br />29<br /><ul><li>Teaching
    • 49. Administrative
    • 50. Accounting
    • 51. Staff
    • 52. Supervisory, management
    • 53. Community fund raising
    • 54. Generalist</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>JCL = 178,000 volunteer hours last year
    • 55. @ $20 per hour = $3,560,000 of Financial Resources
    • 56. NOT including Fundraising, Donations and Legacy Gifts
    • 57. If you had an operating budget of $750,000 it would be a 500% return on investment (ROI)</li></li></ul><li>New Volunteer Opportunities<br />Leadership<br /><ul><li>Team Leaders – oversee volunteer teams
    • 58. Relationship Leaders – communication and peer-to-peer support
    • 59. Transformational Leaders – develop future volunteer leaders</li></ul>Consultant<br /><ul><li>Facilitate meetings
    • 60. Diagnostic and analytic (non-medical)
    • 61. Process review and re-engineering</li></ul>Training<br /><ul><li>Train the trainer
    • 62. On & off boarding processes</li></ul>Specialists<br /><ul><li>Documentation, presentation, and graphics experts
    • 63. Technical projects
    • 64. Event planning, fund raising, and coordination</li></ul>Special Projects<br /><ul><li>Corps of “On Demand” volunteers</li></li></ul><li>Purpose<br /> To develop and organize the Maricopa County marketplace that connects individuals age 50+ to social purpose opportunities.<br />Vision<br /> Experienced People Building a Stronger Community<br />Mission<br /> To create a culture in our community and its organizations that fosters meaningful work and service opportunities for experience people in the second half of life.<br />
    • 65. <ul><li>The Learning Lab</li></ul> Three-day workshop for nonprofit leaders who want to learn how to tap into the valuable and underused resource of community talent.<br /><ul><li> Encore Fellowships</li></ul> Matches highly skilled executives and managers with social purpose organizations for a high-impact assignment for 6-12 months.<br /><ul><li> Explore Your Future Workshops</li></ul> Explore Your Future Workshops are a four-session series designed for employees and individuals age 50+ who are in job transition or seeking to discover their pathway in the next phase of their lives. <br />
    • 66. <ul><li>Your Experience Counts</li></ul>A nationally proven model, Your Experience Counts will match adult mentors aged 55+ with students in grades K through 6 to provide mentoring / tutoring in reading, writing and math. <br /><ul><li> Community Talent Leaders</li></ul> Stipend positions for trained individuals to assist organizations in development, enhancement and implementation of new models of volunteer engagement.<br />
    • 67. Increase your grantees’ abilities to make a difference by engaging older adults:<br /><ul><li>Encourage them to attend the Learning Lab
    • 68. Inform grantees that they can host an Encore Fellow in their organization
    • 69. Sponsor an Encore Fellow at one of your grantee organizations</li></li></ul><li>Thank You<br />
    • 70. Upcoming GIA Programs<br />Economic Security – September 2011 <br />Healthy Aging – December 2011<br />EngAGEment Initiative Design Team <br />....needs your help to plan the next events!<br />Just complete the volunteer form on your table.<br />

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