®Junos OSLogical Systems Configuration GuideRelease11.1Published: 2011-02-07Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.1194 North Mathilda AvenueSunnyvale, California 94089USA408-745-2000www.juniper.netThis product incl...
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENTREAD THIS END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT (“AGREEMENT”) BEFORE DOWNLOADING, INSTALLING, OR USING THE ...
Software in any manner that extends or is broader than the uses purchased by Customer from Juniper or an authorized Junipe...
12. Commercial Computer Software. The Software is “commercial computer software” and is provided with restricted rights. U...
vi   Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Abbreviated Table of Contents                                     About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guideviii                                             Copyright © 2011, Juniper N...
Table of Contents                                     About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide          Chapter 3                 Logical Systems Advanced Configuration ....
List of Figures          Part 1                     Overview and Configuration          Chapter 1                  Logical...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexii                                              Copyright © 2011, Juniper N...
List of Tables                                     About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexiv                                              Copyright © 2011, Juniper N...
About This Guide                                                                                                   ®      ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideObjectives                               This guide provides an overview of ...
About This Guide                                •    MX Series                                •    T Series               ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide                                                    family inet {           ...
About This GuideTable 1: Notice Icons Icon             Meaning                                 Description                ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideTable 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued) Convention                 ...
About This Guide                                or are covered under warranty, and need postsales technical support, you c...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexxii                                             Copyright © 2011, Juniper N...
PART 1Overview and Configuration                                •   Logical Systems Overview on page 3                    ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide2                                                Copyright © 2011, Juniper N...
CHAPTER 1Logical Systems Overview                                This chapter covers these topics:                        ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide                                However, this complexity can lead to challen...
Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview                                Figure 3: Junos OS With Logical Systems                ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide                                   As a result, a network manager can gather...
Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview                                    •   If you do not configure a loopback interface in...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide                               The Junos OS device virtualization technologi...
Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview                                configurations, and their logical interface assignments...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide                               •   Junos OS Release 7.4 or later for multica...
CHAPTER 2Logical Systems Basic Configuration                                This chapter covers these topics:             ...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideOverview                               For some operational-mode commands, y...
Chapter 2: Logical Systems Basic Configuration                                7.      Exit configuration mode to return to...
Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideOverview                               The master administrator can assign o...
Chapter 2: Logical Systems Basic Configuration                                           user@host# set system login class...
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Logical systems-configuration-guide

  1. 1. ®Junos OSLogical Systems Configuration GuideRelease11.1Published: 2011-02-07Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  2. 2. Juniper Networks, Inc.1194 North Mathilda AvenueSunnyvale, California 94089USA408-745-2000www.juniper.netThis product includes the Envoy SNMP Engine, developed by Epilogue Technology, an Integrated Systems Company. Copyright © 1986-1997,Epilogue Technology Corporation. All rights reserved. This program and its documentation were developed at private expense, and no partof them is in the public domain.This product includes memory allocation software developed by Mark Moraes, copyright © 1988, 1989, 1993, University of Toronto.This product includes FreeBSD software developed by the University of California, Berkeley, and its contributors. All of the documentationand software included in the 4.4BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite Releases is copyrighted by the Regents of the University of California. Copyright ©1979, 1980, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994. The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.GateD software copyright © 1995, the Regents of the University. All rights reserved. Gate Daemon was originated and developed throughrelease 3.0 by Cornell University and its collaborators. Gated is based on Kirton’s EGP, UC Berkeley’s routing daemon (routed), and DCN’sHELLO routing protocol. Development of Gated has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation. Portions of the GateDsoftware copyright © 1988, Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Portions of the GateD software copyright © 1991, D.L. S. Associates.This product includes software developed by Maker Communications, Inc., copyright © 1996, 1997, Maker Communications, Inc.Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the UnitedStates and other countries. The Juniper Networks Logo, the Junos logo, and JunosE are trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. All othertrademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners.Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.Products made or sold by Juniper Networks or components thereof might be covered by one or more of the following patents that areowned by or licensed to Juniper Networks: U.S. Patent Nos. 5,473,599, 5,905,725, 5,909,440, 6,192,051, 6,333,650, 6,359,479, 6,406,312,6,429,706, 6,459,579, 6,493,347, 6,538,518, 6,538,899, 6,552,918, 6,567,902, 6,578,186, and 6,590,785. ®Junos OS Logical Systems Configuration GuideRelease 11.1Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.All rights reserved. Printed in USA.Revision HistoryFebruary 2011—R1 Junos OS 11.1The information in this document is current as of the date listed in the revision history.YEAR 2000 NOTICEJuniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. The Junos OS has no known time-related limitations throughthe year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.ii Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  3. 3. END USER LICENSE AGREEMENTREAD THIS END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT (“AGREEMENT”) BEFORE DOWNLOADING, INSTALLING, OR USING THE SOFTWARE.BY DOWNLOADING, INSTALLING, OR USING THE SOFTWARE OR OTHERWISE EXPRESSING YOUR AGREEMENT TO THE TERMSCONTAINED HEREIN, YOU (AS CUSTOMER OR IF YOU ARE NOT THE CUSTOMER, AS A REPRESENTATIVE/AGENT AUTHORIZED TOBIND THE CUSTOMER) CONSENT TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT OR CANNOT AGREE TO THE TERMS CONTAINEDHEREIN, THEN (A) DO NOT DOWNLOAD, INSTALL, OR USE THE SOFTWARE, AND (B) YOU MAY CONTACT JUNIPER NETWORKSREGARDING LICENSE TERMS.1. The Parties. The parties to this Agreement are (i) Juniper Networks, Inc. (if the Customer’s principal office is located in the Americas) orJuniper Networks (Cayman) Limited (if the Customer’s principal office is located outside the Americas) (such applicable entity being referredto herein as “Juniper”), and (ii) the person or organization that originally purchased from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller the applicablelicense(s) for use of the Software (“Customer”) (collectively, the “Parties”).2. The Software. In this Agreement, “Software” means the program modules and features of the Juniper or Juniper-supplied software, forwhich Customer has paid the applicable license or support fees to Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller, or which was embedded byJuniper in equipment which Customer purchased from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller. “Software” also includes updates, upgradesand new releases of such software. “Embedded Software” means Software which Juniper has embedded in or loaded onto the Juniperequipment and any updates, upgrades, additions or replacements which are subsequently embedded in or loaded onto the equipment.3. License Grant. Subject to payment of the applicable fees and the limitations and restrictions set forth herein, Juniper grants to Customera non-exclusive and non-transferable license, without right to sublicense, to use the Software, in executable form only, subject to thefollowing use restrictions:a. Customer shall use Embedded Software solely as embedded in, and for execution on, Juniper equipment originally purchased byCustomer from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller.b. Customer shall use the Software on a single hardware chassis having a single processing unit, or as many chassis or processing unitsfor which Customer has paid the applicable license fees; provided, however, with respect to the Steel-Belted Radius or Odyssey AccessClient software only, Customer shall use such Software on a single computer containing a single physical random access memory spaceand containing any number of processors. Use of the Steel-Belted Radius or IMS AAA software on multiple computers or virtual machines(e.g., Solaris zones) requires multiple licenses, regardless of whether such computers or virtualizations are physically contained on a singlechassis.c. Product purchase documents, paper or electronic user documentation, and/or the particular licenses purchased by Customer mayspecify limits to Customer’s use of the Software. Such limits may restrict use to a maximum number of seats, registered endpoints, concurrentusers, sessions, calls, connections, subscribers, clusters, nodes, realms, devices, links, ports or transactions, or require the purchase ofseparate licenses to use particular features, functionalities, services, applications, operations, or capabilities, or provide throughput,performance, configuration, bandwidth, interface, processing, temporal, or geographical limits. In addition, such limits may restrict the useof the Software to managing certain kinds of networks or require the Software to be used only in conjunction with other specific Software.Customer’s use of the Software shall be subject to all such limitations and purchase of all applicable licenses.d. For any trial copy of the Software, Customer’s right to use the Software expires 30 days after download, installation or use of theSoftware. Customer may operate the Software after the 30-day trial period only if Customer pays for a license to do so. Customer may notextend or create an additional trial period by re-installing the Software after the 30-day trial period.e. The Global Enterprise Edition of the Steel-Belted Radius software may be used by Customer only to manage access to Customer’senterprise network. Specifically, service provider customers are expressly prohibited from using the Global Enterprise Edition of theSteel-Belted Radius software to support any commercial network access services.The foregoing license is not transferable or assignable by Customer. No license is granted herein to any user who did not originally purchasethe applicable license(s) for the Software from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller.4. Use Prohibitions. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the license provided herein does not permit the Customer to, and Customer agreesnot to and shall not: (a) modify, unbundle, reverse engineer, or create derivative works based on the Software; (b) make unauthorizedcopies of the Software (except as necessary for backup purposes); (c) rent, sell, transfer, or grant any rights in and to any copy of theSoftware, in any form, to any third party; (d) remove any proprietary notices, labels, or marks on or in any copy of the Software or any productin which the Software is embedded; (e) distribute any copy of the Software to any third party, including as may be embedded in Juniperequipment sold in the secondhand market; (f) use any ‘locked’ or key-restricted feature, function, service, application, operation, or capabilitywithout first purchasing the applicable license(s) and obtaining a valid key from Juniper, even if such feature, function, service, application,operation, or capability is enabled without a key; (g) distribute any key for the Software provided by Juniper to any third party; (h) use theCopyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. iii
  4. 4. Software in any manner that extends or is broader than the uses purchased by Customer from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller; (i)use Embedded Software on non-Juniper equipment; (j) use Embedded Software (or make it available for use) on Juniper equipment thatthe Customer did not originally purchase from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller; (k) disclose the results of testing or benchmarkingof the Software to any third party without the prior written consent of Juniper; or (l) use the Software in any manner other than as expresslyprovided herein.5. Audit. Customer shall maintain accurate records as necessary to verify compliance with this Agreement. Upon request by Juniper,Customer shall furnish such records to Juniper and certify its compliance with this Agreement.6. Confidentiality. The Parties agree that aspects of the Software and associated documentation are the confidential property of Juniper.As such, Customer shall exercise all reasonable commercial efforts to maintain the Software and associated documentation in confidence,which at a minimum includes restricting access to the Software to Customer employees and contractors having a need to use the Softwarefor Customer’s internal business purposes.7. Ownership. Juniper and Juniper’s licensors, respectively, retain ownership of all right, title, and interest (including copyright) in and tothe Software, associated documentation, and all copies of the Software. Nothing in this Agreement constitutes a transfer or conveyanceof any right, title, or interest in the Software or associated documentation, or a sale of the Software, associated documentation, or copiesof the Software.8. Warranty, Limitation of Liability, Disclaimer of Warranty. The warranty applicable to the Software shall be as set forth in the warrantystatement that accompanies the Software (the “Warranty Statement”). Nothing in this Agreement shall give rise to any obligation to supportthe Software. Support services may be purchased separately. Any such support shall be governed by a separate, written support servicesagreement. TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, JUNIPER SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOST PROFITS, LOSS OF DATA,OR COSTS OR PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES, OR FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGESARISING OUT OF THIS AGREEMENT, THE SOFTWARE, OR ANY JUNIPER OR JUNIPER-SUPPLIED SOFTWARE. IN NO EVENT SHALL JUNIPERBE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES ARISING FROM UNAUTHORIZED OR IMPROPER USE OF ANY JUNIPER OR JUNIPER-SUPPLIED SOFTWARE.EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY PROVIDED IN THE WARRANTY STATEMENT TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, JUNIPER DISCLAIMS ANYAND ALL WARRANTIES IN AND TO THE SOFTWARE (WHETHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, STATUTORY, OR OTHERWISE), INCLUDING ANYIMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT DOESJUNIPER WARRANT THAT THE SOFTWARE, OR ANY EQUIPMENT OR NETWORK RUNNING THE SOFTWARE, WILL OPERATE WITHOUTERROR OR INTERRUPTION, OR WILL BE FREE OF VULNERABILITY TO INTRUSION OR ATTACK. In no event shall Juniper’s or its suppliers’or licensors’ liability to Customer, whether in contract, tort (including negligence), breach of warranty, or otherwise, exceed the price paidby Customer for the Software that gave rise to the claim, or if the Software is embedded in another Juniper product, the price paid byCustomer for such other product. Customer acknowledges and agrees that Juniper has set its prices and entered into this Agreement inreliance upon the disclaimers of warranty and the limitations of liability set forth herein, that the same reflect an allocation of risk betweenthe Parties (including the risk that a contract remedy may fail of its essential purpose and cause consequential loss), and that the sameform an essential basis of the bargain between the Parties.9. Termination. Any breach of this Agreement or failure by Customer to pay any applicable fees due shall result in automatic terminationof the license granted herein. Upon such termination, Customer shall destroy or return to Juniper all copies of the Software and relateddocumentation in Customer’s possession or control.10. Taxes. All license fees payable under this agreement are exclusive of tax. Customer shall be responsible for paying Taxes arising fromthe purchase of the license, or importation or use of the Software. If applicable, valid exemption documentation for each taxing jurisdictionshall be provided to Juniper prior to invoicing, and Customer shall promptly notify Juniper if their exemption is revoked or modified. Allpayments made by Customer shall be net of any applicable withholding tax. Customer will provide reasonable assistance to Juniper inconnection with such withholding taxes by promptly: providing Juniper with valid tax receipts and other required documentation showingCustomer’s payment of any withholding taxes; completing appropriate applications that would reduce the amount of withholding tax tobe paid; and notifying and assisting Juniper in any audit or tax proceeding related to transactions hereunder. Customer shall comply withall applicable tax laws and regulations, and Customer will promptly pay or reimburse Juniper for all costs and damages related to anyliability incurred by Juniper as a result of Customer’s non-compliance or delay with its responsibilities herein. Customer’s obligations underthis Section shall survive termination or expiration of this Agreement.11. Export. Customer agrees to comply with all applicable export laws and restrictions and regulations of any United States and anyapplicable foreign agency or authority, and not to export or re-export the Software or any direct product thereof in violation of any suchrestrictions, laws or regulations, or without all necessary approvals. Customer shall be liable for any such violations. The version of theSoftware supplied to Customer may contain encryption or other capabilities restricting Customer’s ability to export the Software withoutan export license.iv Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  5. 5. 12. Commercial Computer Software. The Software is “commercial computer software” and is provided with restricted rights. Use,duplication, or disclosure by the United States government is subject to restrictions set forth in this Agreement and as provided in DFARS227.7201 through 227.7202-4, FAR 12.212, FAR 27.405(b)(2), FAR 52.227-19, or FAR 52.227-14(ALT III) as applicable.13. Interface Information. To the extent required by applicable law, and at Customers written request, Juniper shall provide Customerwith the interface information needed to achieve interoperability between the Software and another independently created program, onpayment of applicable fee, if any. Customer shall observe strict obligations of confidentiality with respect to such information and shall usesuch information in compliance with any applicable terms and conditions upon which Juniper makes such information available.14. Third Party Software. Any licensor of Juniper whose software is embedded in the Software and any supplier of Juniper whose productsor technology are embedded in (or services are accessed by) the Software shall be a third party beneficiary with respect to this Agreement,and such licensor or vendor shall have the right to enforce this Agreement in its own name as if it were Juniper. In addition, certain third partysoftware may be provided with the Software and is subject to the accompanying license(s), if any, of its respective owner(s). To the extentportions of the Software are distributed under and subject to open source licenses obligating Juniper to make the source code for suchportions publicly available (such as the GNU General Public License (“GPL”) or the GNU Library General Public License (“LGPL”)), Juniperwill make such source code portions (including Juniper modifications, as appropriate) available upon request for a period of up to threeyears from the date of distribution. Such request can be made in writing to Juniper Networks, Inc., 1194 N. Mathilda Ave., Sunnyvale, CA94089, ATTN: General Counsel. You may obtain a copy of the GPL at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html, and a copy of the LGPLat http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl.html .15. Miscellaneous. This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of California without reference to its conflicts of lawsprinciples. The provisions of the U.N. Convention for the International Sale of Goods shall not apply to this Agreement. For any disputesarising under this Agreement, the Parties hereby consent to the personal and exclusive jurisdiction of, and venue in, the state and federalcourts within Santa Clara County, California. This Agreement constitutes the entire and sole agreement between Juniper and the Customerwith respect to the Software, and supersedes all prior and contemporaneous agreements relating to the Software, whether oral or written(including any inconsistent terms contained in a purchase order), except that the terms of a separate written agreement executed by anauthorized Juniper representative and Customer shall govern to the extent such terms are inconsistent or conflict with terms containedherein. No modification to this Agreement nor any waiver of any rights hereunder shall be effective unless expressly assented to in writingby the party to be charged. If any portion of this Agreement is held invalid, the Parties agree that such invalidity shall not affect the validityof the remainder of this Agreement. This Agreement and associated documentation has been written in the English language, and theParties agree that the English version will govern. (For Canada: Les parties aux présentés confirment leur volonté que cette convention demême que tous les documents y compris tout avis qui sy rattaché, soient redigés en langue anglaise. (Translation: The parties confirm thatthis Agreement and all related documentation is and will be in the English language)).Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. v
  6. 6. vi Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  7. 7. Abbreviated Table of Contents About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Part 1 Overview and Configuration Chapter 1 Logical Systems Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter 2 Logical Systems Basic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Chapter 3 Logical Systems Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Part 2 Reference Chapter 4 Summary of Logical Systems Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Part 3 Index Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. vii
  8. 8. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guideviii Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  9. 9. Table of Contents About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Junos OS Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Using the Indexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Part 1 Overview and Configuration Chapter 1 Logical Systems Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Logical Systems Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Logical Systems Operations and Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Comparing Junos OS Device Virtualization Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Logical Systems Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Logical Systems Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Logical Systems Terms and Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Chapter 2 Logical Systems Basic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Example: Running Operational-Mode Commands on Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . 11 Example: Configuring Logical System Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Example: Creating an Interface on a Logical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Example: Connecting a Logical System to a Physical Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Example: Configuring a Stateless Firewall Filter to Protect a Logical System Against ICMP Floods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Example: Connecting Logical Systems Within the Same Router Using Logical Tunnel Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Example: Configuring Static Routes Between Logical Systems Within the Same Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Example: Configuring OSPF on Logical Systems Within the Same Router . . . . . . 30 Example: Configuring an OSPF Default Route Policy on Logical Systems . . . . . . . 37 Example: Configuring a Conditional OSPF Default Route Policy on Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Example: Configuring an OSPF Import Policy on Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 47Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. ix
  10. 10. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide Chapter 3 Logical Systems Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Example: Using Logical Systems to Configure Provider Edge and Provider Routers in a VPN and VPLS Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Configuring Other Logical System Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Part 2 Reference Chapter 4 Summary of Logical Systems Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 [edit logical-systems] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Part 3 Index Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107x Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  11. 11. List of Figures Part 1 Overview and Configuration Chapter 1 Logical Systems Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Figure 1: Logical Systems Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 2: Junos OS Without Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 3: Junos OS With Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Figure 4: Applications of Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Chapter 2 Logical Systems Basic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Figure 5: Logical System Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Figure 6: Logical System Connected to a Physical Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Figure 7: Logical System with a Stateless Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Figure 8: Connecting Two Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Figure 9: Static Routes Between Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Figure 10: OSPF on Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Figure 11: OSPF with a Default Route to an ISP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Figure 12: OSPF with a Conditional Default Route to an ISP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Figure 13: OSPF Import Policy on Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Chapter 3 Logical Systems Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Figure 14: Provider Edge and Provider Logical System Topology Diagram . . . . . . . 58Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xi
  12. 12. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexii Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  13. 13. List of Tables About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Part 1 Overview and Configuration Chapter 1 Logical Systems Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Table 3: Benefits of Virtual Routers, VRF-Lite, and Logical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 8Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xiii
  14. 14. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexiv Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  15. 15. About This Guide ® This preface provides the following guidelines for using the Junos OS Logical Systems Configuration Guide: • Junos OS Documentation and Release Notes on page xv • Objectives on page xvi • Audience on page xvi • Supported Platforms on page xvi • Using the Indexes on page xvii • Using the Examples in This Manual on page xvii • Documentation Conventions on page xviii • Documentation Feedback on page xx • Requesting Technical Support on page xxJunos OS Documentation and Release Notes For a list of related Junos OS documentation, see http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/junos/ . If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the documentation, follow the Junos OS Release Notes. ® To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation, see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/ . Juniper Networks supports a technical book program to publish books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject matter experts with book publishers around the world. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration using the Junos operating system (Junos OS) and Juniper Networks devices. In addition, the Juniper Networks Technical Library, published in conjunction with OReilly Media, explores improving network security, reliability, and availability using Junos OS configuration techniques. All the books are for sale at technical bookstores and book outlets around the world. The current list can be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books .Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xv
  16. 16. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideObjectives This guide provides an overview of the multicast protocols for the Junos OS and describes how to configure multicast protocols on the router. NOTE: For additional information about the Junos OS—either corrections to or information that might have been omitted from this guide—see the software release notes at http://www.juniper.net/ .Audience This guide is designed for network administrators who are configuring and monitoring a Juniper Networks M Series, MX Series, T Series, EX Series, or J Series router or switch. To use this guide, you need a broad understanding of networks in general, the Internet in particular, networking principles, and network configuration. You must also be familiar with one or more of the following Internet routing protocols: • Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) • Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP) • Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) • Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery • Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) • Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) • Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) • Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) • Routing Information Protocol (RIP) • Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Personnel operating the equipment must be trained and competent; must not conduct themselves in a careless, willfully negligent, or hostile manner; and must abide by the instructions provided by the documentation.Supported Platforms For the features described in this manual, the Junos OS currently supports the following platforms: • J Series • M Seriesxvi Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  17. 17. About This Guide • MX Series • T Series • EX SeriesUsing the Indexes This reference contains two indexes: a complete index that includes topic entries, and an index of statements and commands only. In the index of statements and commands, an entry refers to a statement summary section only. In the complete index, the entry for a configuration statement or command contains at least two parts: • The primary entry refers to the statement summary section. • The secondary entry, usage guidelines, refers to the section in a configuration guidelines chapter that describes how to use the statement or command.Using the Examples in This Manual If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming configuration into the current candidate configuration. If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command. If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are described in the following sections.Merging a Full Example To merge a full example, follow these steps: 1. From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform. For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf. Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform. system { scripts { commit { file ex-script.xsl; } } } interfaces { fxp0 { disable; unit 0 {Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xvii
  18. 18. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide family inet { address 10.0.0.1/24; } } } } 2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the load merge configuration mode command: [edit] user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf load completeMerging a Snippet To merge a snippet, follow these steps: 1. From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform. For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform. commit { file ex-script-snippet.xsl; } 2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following configuration mode command: [edit] user@host# edit system scripts [edit system scripts] 3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the load merge relative configuration mode command: [edit system scripts] user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf load complete For more information about the load command, see the Junos OS CLI User Guide.Documentation Conventions Table 1 on page xix defines notice icons used in this guide.xviii Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  19. 19. About This GuideTable 1: Notice Icons Icon Meaning Description Informational note Indicates important features or instructions. Caution Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage. Warning Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death. Laser warning Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser. Table 2 on page xix defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions Convention Description Examples Bold text like this Represents text that you type. To enter configuration mode, type the configure command: user@host> configure Fixed-width text like this Represents output that appears on the user@host> show chassis alarms terminal screen. No alarms currently active Italic text like this • Introduces important new terms. • A policy term is a named structure • Identifies book names. that defines match conditions and actions. • Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles. • Junos OS System Basics Configuration Guide • RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute Italic text like this Represents variables (options for which Configure the machine’s domain name: you substitute a value) in commands or configuration statements. [edit] root@# set system domain-name domain-name Text like this Represents names of configuration • To configure a stub area, include the statements, commands, files, and stub statement at the [edit protocols directories; interface names; ospf area area-id] hierarchy level. configuration hierarchy levels; or labels • The console port is labeled CONSOLE. on routing platform components. < > (angle brackets) Enclose optional keywords or variables. stub <default-metric metric>;Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xix
  20. 20. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideTable 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued) Convention Description Examples | (pipe symbol) Indicates a choice between the mutually broadcast | multicast exclusive keywords or variables on either side of the symbol. The set of choices is (string1 | string2 | string3) often enclosed in parentheses for clarity. # (pound sign) Indicates a comment specified on the rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only same line as the configuration statement to which it applies. [ ] (square brackets) Enclose a variable for which you can community name members [ substitute one or more values. community-ids ] Indention and braces ( { } ) Identify a level in the configuration [edit] hierarchy. routing-options { static { route default { ; (semicolon) Identifies a leaf statement at a nexthop address; configuration hierarchy level. retain; } } } J-Web GUI Conventions Bold text like this Represents J-Web graphical user • In the Logical Interfaces box, select interface (GUI) items you click or select. All Interfaces. • To cancel the configuration, click Cancel. > (bold right angle bracket) Separates levels in a hierarchy of J-Web In the configuration editor hierarchy, selections. select Protocols>Ospf.Documentation Feedback We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can improve the documentation. You can send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net, or fill out the documentation feedback form at https://www.juniper.net/cgi-bin/docbugreport/ . If you are using e-mail, be sure to include the following information with your comments: • Document or topic name • URL or page number • Software release version (if applicable)Requesting Technical Support Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or JNASC support contract,xx Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  21. 21. About This Guide or are covered under warranty, and need postsales technical support, you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC. • JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies, review the JTAC User Guide located at http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf . • Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/ . • JTAC Hours of Operation —The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.Self-Help Online Tools and Resources For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the following features: • Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/ • Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/ • Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/ • Download the latest versions of software and review release notes: http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/ • Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications: https://www.juniper.net/alerts/ • Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum: http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/ • Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/ To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement (SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/Opening a Case with JTAC You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone. • Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/ . • Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico). For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, visit us at http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.htmlCopyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. xxi
  22. 22. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guidexxii Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  23. 23. PART 1Overview and Configuration • Logical Systems Overview on page 3 • Logical Systems Basic Configuration on page 11 • Logical Systems Advanced Configuration on page 57Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 1
  24. 24. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide2 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  25. 25. CHAPTER 1Logical Systems Overview This chapter covers these topics: • Logical Systems Introduction on page 3 • Logical Systems Operations and Restrictions on page 6 • Comparing Junos OS Device Virtualization Technologies on page 7 • Logical Systems Applications on page 8 • Logical Systems Requirements on page 9 • Logical Systems Terms and Acronyms on page 10Logical Systems Introduction For many years, engineers have combined power supplies, routing hardware and software, forwarding hardware and software, and physical interfaces into a networking device known as a router. Networking vendors have created large routers and small routers, but all routers have been placed into service as individual devices. As a result, the router has been considered a single physical device for most of its history. The concept of logical systems breaks with this tradition. With Junos OS, you can partition a single router into multiple logical devices that perform independent routing tasks. Because logical systems perform a subset of the tasks once handled by the main router, logical systems offer an effective way to maximize the use of a single routing or switching platform. NOTE: Beginning with Junos OS Release 9.3, the logical router feature has been renamed logical system. All configuration statements, operational commands, show command output, error messages, log messages, and SNMP MIB objects that contain the string logical-router have been changed to logical-system. Traditionally, service provider network design requires multiple layers of switches and routers. These devices transport packet traffic between customers. As seen on the left side of Figure 1 on page 4, access devices are connected to edge devices, which are in turn connected to core devices.Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 3
  26. 26. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide However, this complexity can lead to challenges in maintenance, configuration, and operation. To reduce such complexity, Juniper Networks supports logical systems. Logical systems perform a subset of the actions of the main router and have their own unique routing tables, interfaces, policies, and routing instances. As shown on the right side of Figure 1 on page 4, a set of logical systems within a single router can handle the functions previously performed by several small routers. Figure 1: Logical Systems Concepts Network topology without logical systems Network topology with logical systems (eight separate physical devices) (one physical router with eight logical devices) Router 1 g016932 Figure 2 on page 4 shows the Junos OS architecture without logical systems configured. Figure 3 on page 5 shows the Junos OS architecture when logical systems are configured. Note that each logical system runs its own Routing Protocol Process (RPD). Figure 2: Junos OS Without Logical Systems Routing Engine CLI MGD Routing Tables Routing Interface Chassis Family: y Protocol Family: x Process Process Process Family: inet Forwarding Kernel Table Forwarding Interface Distributed Chassis Table Process ASICs Process Packet Microkernel g040563 Forwarding Engine4 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  27. 27. Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview Figure 3: Junos OS With Logical Systems Routing CLI MGD Engine Irmuxd RPD RPD RPD Interface Chassis Main LS1 LSn Process Process Family: y LS1/Family: y LSn/Family: y Routing Tables Family: x LS1/Family: x LSn/Family: x Family: inet LS1/Family: inet LSn/Family: inet Forwarding Kernel Table Forwarding Interface Distributed Chassis Table Process ASICs Process Packet Microkernel g040564 Forwarding Engine The following protocols and functions are supported on logical systems: • Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS), Routing Information Protocol (RIP), RIP next generation (RIPng), Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), Label Distribution Protocol (LDP), static routes, and Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and version 6 (IPv6). • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) provider edge (PE) and core provider router functions, such as Layer 2 virtual private networks (VPNs), Layer 3 VPNs, circuit cross-connect (CCC), Layer 2 circuits, and virtual private LAN service (VPLS). • Multicast protocols, such as Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM), Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP), rendezvous point (RP), and source designated router (DR). • All policy-related statements available at the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level. • Most routing options statements available at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level. • Graceful Routing Engine switchover (GRES). • You can assign most interface types to a logical system. For a list of unsupported PICs, see “Logical Systems Operations and Restrictions” on page 6. • Port mirroring, source class usage, destination class usage, unicast reverse-path forwarding, class of service, firewall filters, class-based forwarding, and policy-based accounting work with logical systems when you configure these features on the main router. • The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) has been extended to support logical systems and routing instances. A network management system receives instance-aware information in the following format: logical-system-name/routing-instance@communityCopyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 5
  28. 28. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide As a result, a network manager can gather statistics for a specific community within a routing instance within a logical system. The SNMP manager for a routing instance can request and manage SNMP data only for that routing instance and other routing instances in the same logical system. By default, the SNMP manager for the default routing instance in the main router (inet.0) can access SNMP data from all routing instances. To restrict that manager’s access to the default routing instance only, include the routing-instance-access statement at the [edit snmp] hierarchy level. Related • Logical Systems Operations and Restrictions on page 6 DocumentationLogical Systems Operations and Restrictions Logical systems have the following operations and restrictions: • You can configure a maximum of 15 logical systems plus the master logical system on a router. When a configuration session is in use, users who are tied to the same logical system cannot commit configuration changes. • The router has only one running configuration database, which contains configuration information for the main router and all associated logical systems. When configuring a logical system, a user has his own candidate configuration database, which does not become part of the running configuration database until the user issues the commit statement. • Some high availability features are not supported on logical systems. These features include non-stop routing (NSR), non-stop bridging (NSB), and unified in-service software upgrade (unified ISSU). • The following describes how firewall filters affect the main router, logical systems, and virtual routers. The "default loopback interface" refers to lo0.0 (associated with the default routing table), the “loopback interface in a logical system” refers to lo0.n configured in the logical system, and the “loopback interface in the virtual router” refers to lo0.n configured in the virtual router. If you configure Filter A on the default loopback interface in the main router but do not configure a filter on the loopback interface in a logical system, the logical system does not use a filter. If you configure Filter A on the default loopback interface in the main router but do not configure a loopback interface in a logical system, the logical system uses Filter A. If you configure Filter A on the default loopback interface on the main router and Filter B on the loopback interface in a logical system, the logical system uses Filter B. In a special case of this rule, when you also configure a routing instance of type virtual-router on the logical system, the following rules apply: • If you configure Filter C on the loopback interface in the virtual router, traffic belonging to the virtual router uses Filter C. • If you do not configure a filter on the loopback interface in the virtual router, traffic belonging to the virtual router does not use a filter.6 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  29. 29. Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview • If you do not configure a loopback interface in the virtual router, traffic belonging to the virtual router uses Filter A. • If a logical system experiences an interruption of its routing protocol process (rpd), the core dump output is placed in a file in: /var/tmp/rpd_logical-system-name.core-tarball.number.tgz. Likewise, if you issue the restart routing command in a logical system, only the routing protocol process (rpd) for the logical system is restarted. • If you configure trace options for a logical system, the output log file is stored in the following location: /var/log/logical-system-name. To monitor a log file within a logical system, issue the monitor start logical-system-name/filename command. • The following Physical Interface Cards (PICs) are not supported with logical systems: Adaptive Services, Multiservices, ES, Monitoring Services, and Monitoring Services II. • The Multiservices Dense Port Concentrator (MS-DPC) is not supported with logical systems. • Generalized MPLS (GMPLS), IP Security (IPsec), point-to-multipoint label-switched paths (LSPs), and sampling are not supported. • LSP ping and traceroute for autonomous system (AS) number lookup are not supported. • Class of service (CoS) on a logical tunnel (lt) or virtual loopback tunnel (vt) interface in a logical system is not supported. • You cannot include the vrf-table-label statement on multiple logical systems if the core-facing interfaces are channelized or configured with multiple logical interfaces (Frame Relay DLCIs or Ethernet VLANs). • The master administrator must configure global interface properties and physical interface properties at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level. Logical system administrators can only configure and verify configurations for the logical systems to which they are assigned. Related • Logical Systems Introduction on page 3 DocumentationComparing Junos OS Device Virtualization Technologies The Junos OS supports multiple device virtualization technologies. The technologies have similar names, which can lead to confusion.Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 7
  30. 30. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide The Junos OS device virtualization technologies are: • Logical systems—Offer routing and management separation. Management separation means multiple user access. Each logical system has its own routing tables. Logical routers is the old name for logical systems. Beginning with Junos OS Release 9.3, the logical router feature has been renamed logical system. All configuration statements, operational commands, show command output, error messages, log messages, and SNMP MIB objects that contain the string logical-router have been changed to logical-system. • Virtual routers—Offer scalable routing separation. A virtual router does not have the same capabilities as a logical system. A virtual router is a type of simplified routing instance that has a single routing table. By contrast, a logical system is a partition of the main router and can contain multiple routing instances. • VRF-Lite—Offers routing separation. The functionality of VRF-Lite is similar to virtual routers, but VRF-Lite is for smaller environments. • Virtual switches—Offer scalable switching separation. Table 3 on page 8 summarizes the benefits of virtual routers, VRF-Lite, and logical systemsTable 3: Benefits of Virtual Routers, VRF-Lite, and Logical Systems Benefits Virtual Router VRF-Lite Logical Systems Logical platform Yes Yes Yes partitioning Fault isolation on the No No Yes routing plane Multiple user access No No Yes (management separation) Scalable routing Yes No Yes separation Related • Logical Systems Applications on page 8 DocumentationLogical Systems Applications Logical systems are discrete contexts that virtually divide a supported device into multiple devices, isolating one from another and protecting them from faulty conditions outside their own contexts. The logical systems functionality enables you to partition the device and assign private logical systems to groups or organizations. Logical systems are defined largely by the resources allocated to them, features enabled for the logical context, their routing8 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  31. 31. Chapter 1: Logical Systems Overview configurations, and their logical interface assignments. Logical systems segment a physical router to be configured and operated as multiple independent routers within a platform. This isolates routing protocols and interfaces among up to 16 logical systems (including the master logical system). User permissions and access are defined separately for each logical system, enabling different groups to manage the same physical device. Logical systems enable the use of large routers in small router roles and provide flexible segmentation of routing by service type. Multiple service capabilities bring improved asset optimization by consolidating services into one device. For example, logical systems enable the following services on a single router platform: • Internet BGP peering • Core transit • Edge aggregation and dedicated access • MPLS provider edge (PE) and provider (P) VPN label-switched routers (LSRs) Figure 4 on page 9 shows how logical systems can be used for horizontal consolidation, vertical consolidation, and managed services. Horizontal consolidation occurs when you combine router functions of the same layer into a single router. Vertical consolidation occurs when you collapse router functions of different layers into a single router. With managed services, each logical system is a customer router. Figure 4: Applications of Logical Systems CE CE Vertical Horizontal CE Horizontal P CE P P PE PE Managed CE g040562 PE Related • Comparing Junos OS Device Virtualization Technologies on page 7 DocumentationLogical Systems Requirements To implement logical systems, your system must meet these minimum requirements: • Junos OS Release 8.5 or later for logical system administrator support • Junos OS Release 8.4 or later for SNMP enhancements and limits • Junos OS Release 8.3 or later for Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) on logical systems • Junos OS Release 8.2 or later for support on MX Series routers • Junos OS Release 7.5 or later for SNMP support within a logical systemCopyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 9
  32. 32. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration Guide • Junos OS Release 7.4 or later for multicast protocol RP and source DR functionality within a logical system • Junos OS Release 7.0 or later to implement a logical tunnel (lt) interface on an integrated Adaptive Services Module in an M7i router • Junos OS Release 6.1 or later, a Tunnel Services PIC, and an Enhanced FPC on M Series or T Series routers to implement a logical tunnel (lt) interface • Junos OS Release 6.0 or later for basic logical system functionality • One or more M Series, MX Series, or T Series routers • On M Series and T Series routers, a variety of PICs to assign interfaces to each logical systemLogical Systems Terms and AcronymsA logical system A user account with configuration and verification privileges for only the logical systems to administrator which that user is assigned. master administrator A user account with superuser configuration and verification privileges.L logical system Segmentation of a system into multiple logical devices. Logical system configuration statements are found at the [edit logical-systems] hierarchy level.M main router The standard concept of a router. Main router configuration statements are found at the [edit] hierarchy level.10 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  33. 33. CHAPTER 2Logical Systems Basic Configuration This chapter covers these topics: • Example: Running Operational-Mode Commands on Logical Systems on page 11 • Example: Configuring Logical System Administrators on page 13 • Example: Creating an Interface on a Logical System on page 15 • Example: Connecting a Logical System to a Physical Router on page 17 • Example: Configuring a Stateless Firewall Filter to Protect a Logical System Against ICMP Floods on page 18 • Example: Connecting Logical Systems Within the Same Router Using Logical Tunnel Interfaces on page 22 • Example: Configuring Static Routes Between Logical Systems Within the Same Router on page 25 • Example: Configuring OSPF on Logical Systems Within the Same Router on page 30 • Example: Configuring an OSPF Default Route Policy on Logical Systems on page 37 • Example: Configuring a Conditional OSPF Default Route Policy on Logical Systems on page 41 • Example: Configuring an OSPF Import Policy on Logical Systems on page 47Example: Running Operational-Mode Commands on Logical Systems This example shows how to set the CLI to a specified logical system view, run operational-mode commands for the logical system, and then return to the main router view. • Requirements on page 11 • Overview on page 12 • Configuration on page 12Requirements You must have the view privilege for the logical system.Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 11
  34. 34. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideOverview For some operational-mode commands, you can include a logical-system option to narrow the output of the command or to limit the operation of the command to the specified logical system. For example, the show route command has a logical-system option. To run this command on a logical system called LS3, you can use show route logical-system LS3. However, some commands, such as show interfaces, do not have a logical-system option. For commands like this, you need another approach. You can place yourself into the context of a specific logical system. To configure a logical system context, issue the set cli logical-system logical-system-name command. When you the CLI is in logical system context mode and you enter an operational- mode command, the output of the command displays information related to the logical system only.Configuration Step-by-Step To set the CLI to a specific logical system context: Procedure 1. From the main router, configure the logical system. [edit] user@host# set logical-systems LS3 2. (Optional) Configure interfaces on the logical system. [edit] user@host# set logical-systems LS3 interfaces lt-1/2/0 unit 3 family inet address 10.0.2.1/30 3. If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration. [edit] user@host# commit user@host# exit 4. Set the CLI to view the logical system. user@host> set cli logical-system LS3 Logical system: LS3 user@host:LS3> 5. Run an operational-mode command. user@host:LS3> show interfaces terse Interface Admin Link Proto Local Remote lt-1/2/0 lt-1/2/0.3 up up inet 10.0.2.1/30 6. Enter configuration mode to edit the logical system configuration. user@host:LS3> edit Entering configuration mode user@host:LS3#12 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  35. 35. Chapter 2: Logical Systems Basic Configuration 7. Exit configuration mode to return to operational mode. user@host:LS3# exit Exiting configuration mode 8. Clear the logical system view to return to the main router view. user@host:LS3> clear cli logical-system Cleared default logical system user@host> 9. To achieve the same effect when using a Junos XML protocol client application, include the <set-logical-system> tag: <rpc> <set-logical-system> <logical-system>LS1</logical-system> </set-logical-system> </rpc> Related • Junos OS System Basics and Services Command Reference DocumentationExample: Configuring Logical System Administrators This example shows how to configure logical system administrators. • Requirements on page 13 • Overview on page 14 • Configuration on page 14 • Verification on page 15Requirements You must be the master administrator to assign system administrators to logical systems.Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 13
  36. 36. Junos 11.1 Logical Systems Configuration GuideOverview The master administrator can assign one or more system administrators to each logical system. Logical system administrators are confined to the context of the logical system to which they are assigned. This means that logical system administrators cannot access any global configuration statements. This also means that command output is restricted to the context to which the logical system administrators are assigned. Configuring a user account for each logical system helps in navigating the CLI. This enables you to log in to each logical system and be positioned within the root of that logical system as if you were in the root of a physical router. In this example, LS1Admin has full permissions on logical system LS1. In this example, LS2Admin has the ability to view logical system LS2 but not to change the configuration. Figure 5 on page 14 shows how logical system administration works. Figure 5: Logical System Administrators Active Configuration Editable by multiple master administrators LS1 Specific Candidate Configuration Configuration LS1Admin1’s personal copy Candidate Configuration LS1Admin2’s personal copy Candidate Configuration LS2 Specific LS2Admin’s personal copy Configuration LS1Admin1 LS1Admin2 g040565 LS2Admin MasterAdmin1 MasterAdmin2Configuration Step-by-Step To assign logical system administrators to a logical systems: Procedure 1. Configure the logical systems. [edit] user@host# set logical-systems LS1 user@host# set logical-systems LS2 2. Create the login classes and assign logical systems to the classes. [edit] user@host# set system login class admin1 logical-system LS1 user@host# set system login class admin2 logical-system LS2 3. Assign permissions to the login classes. [edit]14 Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc.
  37. 37. Chapter 2: Logical Systems Basic Configuration user@host# set system login class admin1 permissions all user@host# set system login class admin2 permissions view 4. Assign users to the login classes. [edit] user@host# set system login user LS1Admin class admin1 user@host# set system login user LS2Admin class admin2 5. If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration. [edit] user@host# commitVerification To verify that the configuration is working properly, issue the show cli authorization command to view permissions for the current user. Related • Junos OS Access Privilege Guide DocumentationExample: Creating an Interface on a Logical System This example shows how to create an interface on a logical system. • Requirements on page 15 • Overview on page 16 • Configuration on page 16 • Verification on page 16Requirements For the interface on the logical system to have connectivity, the corresponding physical interface must be administratively up, and the physical link must be up. You can verify the status of the physical interface by running the show interfaces terse command.Copyright © 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. 15

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