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 Introducing Pattern Matching  in Scala
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Introducing Pattern Matching in Scala

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Introducing Pattern Matching in Scala

Introducing Pattern Matching in Scala

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  • 1. Introducing Pattern Matching Ayush Kumar Mishra Sr. Software Consultant Knoldus
  • 2. What is Pattern MatchingPattern Matching lets you match a value against severalcases, sort of like a switch statement in Java. So in Java,one might write something like this:public boolean checkPrime(int number) { // checks if a number between 1 and 10 is prime switch (number) { case 1: return true; case 2: return true; case 3: return true; case 5: return true; case 7: return true; default: return false; }}
  • 3. ● One of the major limitations of switch/case in Java (and really any C derivative language) is that it can only be used on primitives.● You were unable to use strings as entries in switch- case statements.● As the name suggests, pattern matching enables the checking of a sequence of tokens for the presence of the same pattern.● The pattern matching is not something new. It is something that appears already in some other languages like OCaml, Haskell.
  • 4. ● A pattern match includes a sequence of alternatives● An alternative starts with the keyword case. General syntax: case pattern => result● Each alternative includes a pattern and one or more expressions, which will be evaluated if the pattern matches.● An arrow symbol => separates the pattern from the expressions.● Symbol _ is used to formulate the default case.
  • 5. REPLTraditional approach:object Test { def knolX(x: Int): String = x match { case 1 => "one" case 2 => "two" case _ => "many" }}
  • 6. REPLdefined module Testscala> Test.knolX(2)res2: String = twoscala> Test.knolX(3)res3: String = manyscala>
  • 7. Constant Pattern● ConstantMatch is a function that takes a parameter of type Any.● Any is the Scala pendant to java.lang.Object.● This value is now matched against several constants.object Test { def knolX(x: Any): Any = x match { case 1 => "one" case "two" => 2 case y: Int => "scala.Int" case _ => "many" }}
  • 8. REPLdefined module Testscala> Test.knolX(1)res4: Any = onescala> Test.knolX("two")res5: Any = 2scala>
  • 9. Matching Using case Classes:● The case classes are special classes that are used in pattern matching with case expressions.● Syntactically, these are standard classes with a special modifier: case.● Case classes are classes with part of their behavior predefined in order to make easier their construction and their use in a pattern.
  • 10. REPLobject Test {val alice = new KnolX("Alice", 25)val bob = new KnolX("Bob", 32)val charlie = new KnolX("Charlie", 32) for (knolX <- List(alice, bob, charlie)) { knolX match { case KnolX("Alice", 25) => println("Hi Alice!") case KnolX("Bob", 32) => println("Hi Bob!") } } // case class, empty one. case class KnolX(name: String, age: Int)}scala> TestHi Alice!Hi Bob!
  • 11. Use OR in Casedef toYesOrNo(choice: Int): String = choice match { case 1 | 2 | 3 => "yes" case 0 => "no" case _ => "error" }scala> toYesOrNo(1)res7: String = yesscala> toYesOrNo(2)res8: String = yesscala>
  • 12. Functional approach to pattern matchingIt provides an alternative way to design functions. For example, consider the factorial function. If you choose the recursive version, usually, you would define it like this:def fact(n:Int):Int = if (n==0) 1 else n * factorial(n-1)But you can use Scala’s pattern matching in this case:def fact(n: Int): Int = n match { case 0 => 1 case n => n * fact(n - 1) }scala> fact(5)res10: Int = 120
  • 13. Pattern matching and collectionPattern matching may be applied to the collections.Below is a function that computes the length of a list without pattern matching:def length[A](list : List[A]) : Int = { if (list.isEmpty) 0 else 1 + length(list.tail) }
  • 14. Here is the same function with pattern matching:In this function, there are two cases.The last one checks if the list is empty with the Nil value. The first one checks if there is at least one element is the list.The notation _ :: tail should be understood “a list with whatever head followed by a tail”. Here the tail can be Nil (ie. empty list) or a non-empty list.def length[A](list : List[A]) : Int = list match { case _ :: tail => 1 + length(tail) case Nil => 0 }
  • 15. length: [A](list: List[A])Intscala> length(List(1,2,3))res8: Int = 3scala> length(List())res10: Int = 0
  • 16. Typed pattern Type patterns allow to calculate the result based on the type of the value.● Use a type annotation to match certain types only: def whatIsIt(any: Any) = any match { case x: String => "A String: " + x case _: Int => "An Int value" case _ => "Something unknown" } scala> whatIsIt("12:01") res01: java.lang.String = A String: 12:01 scala> whatIsIt(1) res1: java.lang.String = An Int value The typed pattern is always combined with the wildcard or variable pattern
  • 17. Tuple pattern• Use tuple syntax to match and decompose tuples: def whatIsIt(any: Any) = any match { case ("12:00", "12:01") => "12:00..12:01" case ("12:00", x) => "High noon and " + x case _ => "Something else" }• scala> whatIsIt("12:00" -> "midnight") res0: java.lang.String = High noon and midnight• The tuple pattern is combined with other patterns, e.g. with the constant or variable pattern
  • 18. Constructor pattern● Use constructor syntax to match and decompose case classes: def whatIsIt(any: Any) = any match { case Time(12, 00) => "High noon" case Time(12, minutes) => "12:%02d" format minutes } scala> whatIsIt(Time(12, 01)) res0: java.lang.String = 12:01● The constructor pattern is combined with other pattern, e.g. with the constant or variable pattern or with deeply nested constructor patterns
  • 19. For-expressions with Scala
  • 20. ● For-expressions are for iteration, but they aren’t loops, they yield a collection.● General syntax: for (seq) yield expr● seq contains generators, definitions and filters● expr creates an element of the resulting collection
  • 21. Generators● Generators drive the iteration x <- coll● coll is the collection to be iterated .● x is a variable bound to the current element of the iteration.● The (first) generator determines the type of the result:● scala> for (i <- List(1, 2, 3)) yield i + 1 res0: List[Int] = List(2, 3, 4)● scala> for (i <- Set(1, 2, 3)) yield i + 1 res1: ...Set[Int] = Set(2, 3, 4)
  • 22. Multiple generators● Either separate multiple generators by semicolon● Or better use curly braces and new lines:● scala> for { | i <- 1 to 3 | j <- 1 to i | } yield i * j res0: ...IndexedSeq[Int] = Vector(1, 2, 4, 3, 6, 9)
  • 23. Filters● Filters control the iteration if expr● expr must evaluate to a Boolean● Filters can follow generators without semicolon or new line:● scala> for { | i <- 1 to 3 if i % 2 == 1 | j <- 1 to i | } yield i * j res0: ...IndexedSeq[Int] = Vector(1, 3, 6, 9)
  • 24. Definitions● Definitions are like local val definitions x = expr● Definitions can also be directly followed by a filter:● scala> for { | time <- times | hours = time.hours if hours > 12 | } yield (hours - 12) + "pm" res0: List[String] = List(1pm, 2pm)