Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
eMargin Presentation to BA English Students
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

eMargin Presentation to BA English Students

  • 772 views
Published

Presentation given to 3rd Year Undergraduate English Students on Narrative Analysis module at Brimingham City University. Followed by demonstration of eMargin text annotation software: …

Presentation given to 3rd Year Undergraduate English Students on Narrative Analysis module at Brimingham City University. Followed by demonstration of eMargin text annotation software: http://emargin.bcu.ac.uk/

Published in Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
772
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A collaborative textual annotation tool rdues.bcu.ac.uk Research & Development Unit for English Studies Andrew Kehoe Director
  • 2. Background: Our Research
    • Building own search engine for linguistic study
    • Extracting examples of real language use
    • New words, rare words, new meanings for old words
    • www.webcorp.org.uk
    • Developing software to analyse language use in large text collections (Corpus Linguistics)
    • Series of research projects
    Classifying New Words Document Similarity Semantic Relations synonyms, antonyms Word Dispreference
  • 3. Issue: English Literature Study How do you study a printed text? ‘ Close Reading’: detailed study of short text extracts down to individual word level.
  • 4.
    • (re-)read the text
    • underline important words
    • make notes in margin
    • colour-code
    • draw out themes/motifs
  • 5. An Established Tradition
    • Origins in study of religious texts dating back to Middle Ages.
    Martin Luther: Lectures on Romans (1515) Glossae: student’s notes in the margins
  • 6. Limitations of Traditional Model
    • Annotations tied to printed copy of text
    • Difficult to share / combine in class
    • Annotations not searchable
    • Text quickly becomes cluttered with underlining/notes on each re-reading.
  • 7. Increasing emphasis on e-texts but surprising lack of software to support close reading. Difficult to annotate (‘sticky notes’) Difficult to search annotations Difficult to share annotations
  • 8.
    • ‘ Book Lovers Fear Dim Future for Notes in the Margins’, New York Times, Feb 20 2011:
      • writing comments alongside passages…is a rich literary pastime , sometimes regarded as a tool of literary archaeology, …but it has an uncertain fate in a digitalized world
    Limitations of Traditional Model
  • 9. Our Solution
    • Web-based collaborative annotation system operating down to word level .
    • Initial idea late-2007; basic prototype developed allowing simple text highlighting and commenting.
    • Trialled in English classes at BCU and University of Leicester – feedback from lecturers/students.
    • Funding for project, 2011-12.
    • Full version being developed now.
  • 10. Demonstration http://emargin.bcu.ac.uk [email_address]