• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this document? Why not share!

MBA HRM- Capstone Class Project: Toledo Club

on

  • 3,043 views

Class project in MBA Capstone class on the Toledo Club. Project aim was to discover the reason for decline in club membership.

Class project in MBA Capstone class on the Toledo Club. Project aim was to discover the reason for decline in club membership.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,043
Views on SlideShare
3,043
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
48
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    MBA HRM- Capstone Class Project: Toledo Club MBA HRM- Capstone Class Project: Toledo Club Document Transcript

    • The Toledo Club College of Business Community Consulting Project Team: Dr. Schramko Amy French Jeff Huston Ayesha Riaz Adam Kopchian 1
    • Index INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................3 SCOPE OF PROJECT.........................................................................................................................................3 PROBLEM DEFINED.........................................................................................................................................3 RECOMMENDATIONS:............................................................................................................................4 MISSION STATEMENT:...........................................................................................................................5 EVALUATION OF MISSION STATEMENT..........................................................................................5 AREA ANALYSIS........................................................................................................................................7 BRIEF HISTORY OF TOLEDO:............................................................................................................................7 AGE DEMOGRAPHICS:.....................................................................................................................................8 COMPETITION COMPARISON:............................................................................................................................8 LOCAL CLUBS’ AMENITIES ................................................................................................................9 THE “**” ABOVE DENOTE THE AREAS OF POTENTIAL COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR THE TOLEDO CLUB OVER THEIR COMPETITORS. THESE ARE AREAS THAT THERE IS LESS COMPETITION IN, AND COULD BE TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF TO INCREASE MEMBERSHIPS AND REVENUES.................................................................................10 SWOT ANALYSIS.....................................................................................................................................11 STRENGTHS.................................................................................................................................................11 WEAKNESS..................................................................................................................................................11 OPPORTUNITIES............................................................................................................................................11 THREATS.....................................................................................................................................................11 INTERNAL FACTOR EVALUATION MATRIX.................................................................................12 EXTERNAL FACTOR EVALUATION MATRIX................................................................................12 COMPETITIVE PROFILE MATRIX.....................................................................................................14 TOWS MATRIX.........................................................................................................................................15 SPACE MATRIX........................................................................................................................................16 QUANTITATIVE STRATEGIC PLANNING MATRIX (QSPM)......................................................17 CONCLUSION: ........................................................................................................................................20 2
    • Introduction Scope of Project The Toledo Club (TTC) has experienced a decline in membership over the last few years. The University of Toledo’s MBA strategy students have examined The Toledo Club’s membership, operation, facilities, and competitors. The analysis was completed in three stages. Stage one, the input stage, summarizes the basic input information needed to formulate strategies. These strategies include the following matrices: Internal Factors Evaluation (IFE), External Factors Evaluations (EFE), and the Competitive Profile Matrix (CPM). Stage two, the matching stage, focused on generating feasible alternative strategies by aligning key internal and external factors. These techniques used include the following matrices: Threats, Opportunities, weakness and Strength Matrix (TOWS), which assessed the position of the Toledo Club in the current market, and the Strategic Position and Action Evaluation (SPACE) matrix which explained the type of strategy to be used in competing. In stage three, the decision stage, the Quantitative Strategic Planning Matrix (QSPM) objectively indicated which alternative strategies are best for the Toledo Club. Problem Defined According to its leadership, The Toledo Club has and continues to experience a steady decline in membership. The graph below demonstrates this decline in membership for the past 7 years. The decline in membership however is an outcome and not a problem. The Toledo Club has been in existence since 1889 and promises to offer a unique combination of cultural, social, and athletic 3
    • opportunities to its members. The project team has discovered that the Toledo Club’s problem was its inability to adapt and revise its operations to reflect the changing environment. Recommendations: 1) Additional Events and Programs Lucas county has and still is experiencing a change in its demographics and its market economy. Therefore, it is our belief that the Toledo Club should broaden their scope and offer additional events and programs. These would include a) An upscale Spa and women’s solon to compliment the men’s barber shop and massages already offered. b) Host continuing professional education couses for CPA’s, lawyers, realitors and other professionals. This would increase the business networking aspect that the Toledo Club has been known for. Perhaps even offer a few free seminars with a business membership. c) Provide cooking classes and other cultural events to add to the already existing social calandar of events. These new events should be offered to non-members as well as members. This will not only help increase memberships but also bring in additional revenues. 2) Upgrade Facilities Upgrading the Toledo Club’s greatest asset will not only add value to its membership but help give it a competitive advantage. Some ideas include: a) Create a “high class” sporting event viewing room. This will provide opportunities for its members to come, network, and enjoy the “big game” while appeasing their appetites. b) The business center should be upgraded to include CNN and current stock prices. Computer equipment should be current and include all the equipment necessary to host continuing professional educational classes. Maybe even have a separate computer lab. c) Specialty blended coffees and a juice bar would be a great addition for the young professional. d) A gaming room that is “kid” or “teen” friendly, including, Wii games and perhaps an X-Box 360 tournaments. This would make it easy for mom and dad to have a nice meal while the kids played. 3) Increase Marketing 4
    • Increased marketing will raise the level of awareness of the Toledo Club in the local community. Marketing will introduce the club to Toledo’s new comers and young professionals that have not yet relized the true value of networking possibilites available with a membership at The Toledo Club. Vision Statement The Toledo Club does not currently have a vision statement. A suggested vision statement has been created below: To be a club, which provides exceptional service in a historically rich clubhouse, where family activities go hand in hand with culturally rich events and where community leaders socialize and conduct business. Mission Statement: The Toledo Club does not have a mission statement. Following is a suggested mission statement based on market research. The Toledo Club strives to provide local area professionals of all ages and their families a home away from home. Situated in downtown Toledo and only a few steps away from major city attractions and venues, the Club’s staff provides an inviting atmosphere for networking, social gatherings, and fine dining with state of the art technology. It is our mission to be the premier business and social destination in the Toledo area, moving forward in the 21st century, and providing a healthy working environment for our valued employees. Evaluation of Mission Statement The mission statement of TTC addresses nine essential mission statement components. The following list shows how the mission statement addresses each component. 1. Customers The customers are clearly defined as “…local area professionals of all ages and their families…” 2. Products or Services The services offered are “…an inviting atmosphere for networking, social gatherings, and fine dining…” 5
    • 3. Markets The market being served is “…local area professionals…” 4. Technology Technology has been addressed in “…the Club’s staff provides an inviting atmosphere for networking, social gatherings, state of the art technology.” 5. Concern for survival, growth and profitability This is best illustrated by the phrase “…to be the premier business and social destination…” 6. Philosophy TTC’s philosophy of continuous improvement is stated as “…Toledo Club strives to provide local area professionals of all ages and their families a home away from home…” 7. Self-concept The distinctive competence of TTC is it’s “…premier business and social destination…” 8. Concern for Public Image Concern for the public is evidenced by the commitment to work to “…provide local area professionals of all ages and their families a home away from home...” 9. Concern for Employees The Toledo Club values its employees and explicitly states “…provide a healthy working environment for our valued employees” 6
    • Area Analysis Brief history of Toledo: Toledo was incorporated in 1836. The introduction of the railroad in the second half of the nineteenth century, lead Toledo to become a manufacturing hub through the 1970’s. A significant number of industries began to emerge, including: furniture companies, breweries, railroad manufacturing, and glass companies. The Libbey Glass Works helped to make Toledo known as the quot;City of Glassquot; (Ohio Historical Society). Historically, Toledo is best known for industrial manufacturing, although these industries have declined considerably in past decades. Lucas County is home to three Fortune 500 companies: Dana Corporation, Owens Corning and Owens-Illinois (O-I). O-I has recently relocated from downtown Toledo to suburban Perrysburg. HCR Manor Care, a Fortune 1000 company is also headquartered in Toledo. The University of Toledo is currently the largest employer in Toledo. Manufacturing now employs fewer workers than the health care industry. The first graph shows the total population for Lucas County for every ten years from 1950 to 2000, and years 2001 thru 2006 are estimates. The second graph shows a trend analysis for Lucas County population (Red) and The Toledo Club (Blue) with 2000 as the base year. 7
    • Age Demographics: According to the membership records provided to us, the average age of a Toledo Club member is approximately 60 years old. The age demographics of the state of Ohio, Lucas County, and the Toledo Club are compared in the table and graph below. Age < Age 15 - Age 25 Age 35 Age 45 Age 55 Age 65 Over Total 14 24 - 34 - 44 - 54 - 64 - 74 75 2006 - Ohio 19.80% 14.00% 12.60% 14.20% 15.10% 11.00% 6.60% 6.70% 100.00% 2006 - Lucas 20.87% 14.48% 12.91% 13.62% 14.81% 10.63% 6.01% 6.66% 100.00% county Toledo Club 0.00% 0.49% 5.30% 10.34% 22.66% 26.11% 12.56% 22.54% 100.00% The age demographics for the State of Ohio and Lucas County are similar in each age group. The largest age group, citizens aged 45 to 54, account for 15.1% and 14.81% of the population for the State of Ohio and Lucas County respectively. The second largest age group, citizens aged 35 to 44, account for 14.2 % and 13.62% of the population for the State of Ohio and Lucas County respectively. After analyzing the demographics, the average age of a member of the Toledo Club is significantly higher than that of Lucas County. However, one should consider the fact that a membership to a club of this stature comes with the accomplishment and success one achieves during their career. The following section compares the membership age of The Toledo Club to its competitors. Competition Comparison: The age of membership at The Toledo Club is significantly older than its competitors in the area. The graph below shows the club’s average age is the oldest. Members of Inverness, which has the second 8
    • highest average age, are on average 10 years younger than members of The Toledo Club. The second graph compares the memberships of some of the clubs in the area. ** Note the Toledo club is actual members, not memberships Local Clubs’ Amenities Amenities % Of Other Area Clubs The Toledo Club Banquet Hall** 40% Yes 9
    • Business Center** Less than 5% Yes Fine Dining** 27% Yes Fitness 53% Yes Golf 60% No Tennis 67% No Racket Ball 20% No Volleyball 20% No Squash** Less than 5% Yes Pool – Indoor** 13% Yes Pool – Outdoor 53% No Pro Shop 53% No Restaurant/Bar 53% Yes Clubs included in analysis: Bowling Green Country Club Brandywine Country Club Heatherdowns Country Club Highland Meadows Country Club Inverness Club Laurel Hill Swim and Tennis Club Shadow Valley Tennis and Fitness Stone Oak Country Club Sylvania Country Club Synergy Tamaron Country Club Toledo Country Club Toledo Tennis Club Urban Active YMCA/JCC The “**” above denote the areas of potential competitive advantage for the Toledo Club over their competitors. These are areas that there is less competition in, and could be taken advantage of to increase memberships and revenues. 10
    • SWOT Analysis Since 1915 the Toledo club has been located in downtown Toledo, in a building that is known for its beautiful architecture and rich history. The capable staff provides quality service and magnificent dining. The socially affluent members provide a vast networking opportunity for many business associates. There are many opportunities to create new, culturally interesting, and fun club programs to meet the needs of family members, business associates and individuals. For example, the athletic facilities, such as the workout room, could be updated to attract the business associate that is looking for a lunchtime workout. Or the satellite kitchens can offer fun and interesting culinary classes for all ages. In looking at areas that could be improved, the dark interior of the club was noticeable. Brightening the décor or just improving the overall lighting would greatly enhance its overall appeal. Since the majority of the members are older, it appears that there is not enough available to attract the younger generation. Creating new programs, as those mentioned above, should be marketed to increase public knowledge and renew interest. The Toledo Club also has reciprocity with many other clubs and the value added factor of these should be reevaluated. Clubs in the surrounding area are experiencing several threats to their memberships. There are many product substitutions, such as other clubs for families and individuals to choose from that are located within a relatively small radius. The general population in the Toledo area is also declining. This is due to a combination of factors; people moving out of the downtown area, loss of employment, and the younger generation moving out of state. Overall, The Toledo Club has a lot to offer, and by making some changes, we believe membership will increase over time. SWOT Analysis Strengths Weakness Opportunities Threats 1. 8 reciprocal Clubs 1. Locations – Dark 1. Offer events and programs 1. Other clubs in the (business training seminars) area interior 2. Update workout room 2. Decline in area 2. Strong name recognition 2. Aging members & population decline in current memberships 3. Use TC building as center for 3. Tax law changes 3. Rich History/building 3. Lack of Programs economic growth architecture 4. Affluent Members 4. Technology 4. Update facility infrastructure. 4. Decline in area economy 5. Loyal Members 5. Family appeal 6. Networking opportunities 6. Inadequate marketing 7. High class/event Hall 8. Capable staff 9. Good dining 10. Multiple meeting rooms 11
    • Internal Factor Evaluation Matrix The Internal Factor Evaluation matrix summarizes and evaluates the major strengths and weaknesses in the functional areas of the Toledo Club, and it also provides a basis for identifying and evaluating relationships among those areas. The strengths and weakness are rated on the weight of importance and given a rating. A highly weighted score shows a particular strength while a high weighted weakness with a low rating shows a particularly vulnerable weakness. Internal Factor Evaluation Matrix (IFE) WEIGHTED KEY INTERNAL FACTORS WEIGHT RATING SCORE Internal Strengths 1. Reciprocity with other clubs .05 3 .15 2. Name recognition .05 4 .20 3. Rich History /building .05 4 .20 4. Affluent members .05 2 .10 5. Loyal members .05 3 .15 6. Networking opportunities .10 2 .20 7. High Class/historical event hall .05 4 .20 8. Capable staff .05 3 .15 9. Good Restaurants/good food .10 4 .40 10. Many meeting rooms .05 4 .20 Internal Weakness 1. Location .05 1 .05 2. Declining membership .05 1 .05 3. Lack of cultural/business .10 1 .10 4. Technology .05 2 .20 5. Minimal Family appeal .10 2 .20 6. Inadequate marketing .05 1 .05 Total 1.00 2.60 The key internal strength factors given the most weight were the networking opportunities and dining. The key internal weaknesses, which were given the most weight, were the lack of programming and minimal family appeal. For the IFE, total weighted scores well below 2.5 characterize organizations that are weak internally, whereas scores significantly above 2.5 indicate a strong internal position. From the IFE total it is concluded that the Toledo Club is strong internally. External Factor Evaluation Matrix 12
    • This matrix will summarize and evaluate the economic, social, cultural, demographic, environmental, political, governmental, legal, technological, and competitive information pertaining to the Toledo Club. External Factor Evaluation Matrix (EFE) The opportunity WEIGHTED KEY EXTERNAL FACTORS WEIGHT RATING SCORE Opportunities 1. Offer formulized/diverse program classes .15 2 .3 2. Updated workout facilities .10 1 .10 3. Use TC building as center for economic .10 1 .10 growth 4. Updated facility infrastructure .20 3 .60 Threats 1. Multiple product substitutes/other clubs in .15 1 .15 the area 2. Decline in area population .10 2 .20 3. Changes in tax laws .05 3 .15 4. Decline in Toledo’s economy .15 1 .15 Total 1.00 1.75 factors given the most importance were updating the facility infrastructure and the option of offering more formulized/diverse programs. The threat factors given the most weight were multiple substitute products and the declining economy of Toledo. On average the total weighted score is 2.5 for the EFE. A total weighted score of 4.0 indicates that an organization is responding in an outstanding way to existing opportunities and threats in its industry. A score of 1.75 indicates that the Toledo Club’s strategies are not capitalizing on opportunities or avoiding external threats. 13
    • Competitive Profile Matrix This matrix identifies the Toledo Club’s major competitors and their particular strengths and weaknesses in relation to the Toledo Club’s strategic position. The weights and total weighted scores in both a CPM and the External Factor Evaluation (EFE) have the same meaning. Three major competitors where chosen for comparison against The Toledo Club. First is Inverness club, which is one of the well-known private golf country clubs in the Toledo area. The second competitor, the Toledo Country Club, was selected for its accommodations, scenery and fine dinning. The third competitor, Urban Active, is new to the Toledo area and is still undergoing construction. When completed, the new fitness center aims to offer the latest in physical training, programming and fitness training. Competitive Profile Matrix for the Toledo Club Toledo Club Inverness Toledo Urban Active Country Club CRITICAL SUCCESS Weight Rating Score Rating Score Rating Score Rating Score FACTORS Advertising 0.05 1 0.05 4 0.20 1 0.05 4 0.20 Product Quality 0.20 3 0.60 4 0.80 3 0.60 4 0.80 Price 0.15 4 0.60 2 0.30 3 0.45 4 0.60 Competitiveness Management 0.10 3 0.30 3 0.30 3 0.30 4 0.40 Financial 0.10 1 0.10 3 0.30 3 0.30 4 0.40 Position Customer 0.10 3 0.30 4 0.40 3 0.30 1 0.10 Loyalty Scope of 0.20 2 0.40 4 0.80 4 0.80 2 0.40 Services Market 0.10 1 0.10 3 0.30 2 0.20 2 0.20 Penetration Total 100 2.45 3.40 3.00 3.10 14
    • TOWS Matrix This is an important matching tool that will help Toledo Club develop four types of strategies: SO Strategies (strength, opportunities), WO Strategies (weakness, opportunities), ST Strategies (strength, threat), and WT Strategies (weakness threat). Strengths Weakness 1. 8 Reciprocal Clubs 1. Location/dark and drab interior 2. Strong name recognition 2. Aging membership/decline in 3. Rich history/Building new members Architecture 3. Lack of programs 4. Affluent members 4. Technology 5. Loyal members 5. Minimal family appeal 6. Potential Networking 6. Inadequate marketing opportunities 7. High class/event hall 8. Capable staff 9. Good dining 10. Multiple meeting rooms Opportunities 1. Offer events/Programs (S4, S6,1. Lighten interior (O2, W1) 1. Offer programs (business S8, S9, S10, O1, O2) 2. Upgrade Business Center (O1, training seminars) 2. Juice Bar/Specialty Coffees O3, W3, W4, W6) 2. Update workout facilities (S4, S8, S10, O1, O2) 3. Use TC building as center 3. SPA/Women’s salon (S8, S4, for economic growth S5, O2) 4. Updated facility infrastructure (Pool table – Billiards room) Threats 1. Large screen TV’s in a dining 1. Family/weekend programming 1. Product Substitutes/Many area and business center (S4, (W1, W3, W5, T1, T2, T4) other clubs in local area S6, S7, S8, T1, T2) 2. Gaming room (W5, W3, W4, (New club Gold’s Gym) 2. Use Building for commerce T2, T4, T1) 2. Declining area population and economic development to 3. Increase marketing (W6, T1) 3. Changes in tax laws occur (S4, S3, S5, S6, S7, S8, 4. Decline in Toledo’s T2, T4) economy/People moving to suburbs The recommended SO Strategies use the Toledo Club’s internal strengths to take advantage of external opportunities such as the strategy to offer more programs at the club. The WO Strategies aim at improving internal weaknesses by taking advantage of external opportunities, for example it is recommended by the matrix to upgrade the current business center at the club as a WO strategy. The ST Strategies use the Toledo Club’s strengths to avoid or reduce the impact of external threats. An example of a ST strategy is to install large screen TV’s in the dining area and business center. Finally, the WT Strategies are defensive tactics directed at reducing internal weaknesses and avoiding environmental threats. An example of a WT strategy is to increase marketing for the Toledo Club. 15
    • SPACE Matrix The SPACE (Strategic Position and Action Evaluation) Matrix is a tool used to identify the most appropriate strategy for a company to undertake in order to achieve a strategic position amongst the competition. Through the SPACE Matrix, companies can take advantage of one of four strategies: aggressive, conservative, defensive or competitive. The axes of the SPACE Matrix are made up of financial strengths (+Y axis), environmental stability (-Y axis), competitive advantage (-X axis) and industry strength (+X axis). It is these factors that allow companies to determine their strategic position through the SPACE Matrix. From the SPACE matrix of the Toledo Club, it is shown that the directional vector is located in the lower right or the competitive quadrant of the SPACE Matrix. This indicates that the Toledo Club should pursue competitive strategies for its line of business. Examples of competitive strategies can include: backward, forward, and horizontal integration; market penetration; market development; product development and joint ventures. 16
    • SPACE Matrix FINANCIAL STRENGTH Ratings • Negative ROA (-0.013) as TTC failed to break even in previous year 2.0 • 2.0 TTC net income was $(50,268), 12% better than last year 1.0 • TTC revenue dropped 7.65% to $308,767 1.0 6.0 • Assumed liquidity problems due to declining membership INDUSTRY STRENGTH • Potential membership increase by growth in surrounding cities 4.0 • Strategic alliances with surrounding clubs 5.0 • Mature industry with experienced management 4.0 3.0 16.0 • Technological Advances in club programs ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY • Growing and intense competition -6.0 • Projected membership growth in the Toledo area market -3.0 • Varying price range of competing club programs -4.0 -5.0 -18.0 • Increasing inflation and decrease in economy COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE • Brand equity and name recognition -1.0 • Current members level of loyalty -2.0 • Facility architecture -3.0 -4.0 -10.0 • TTC program & facility offering quality CONCLUSION • ES Average is -18.0 ÷ 4 = -4.5 • IS Average is + 16.0 ÷ 4 = 4.0 • CA Average is -10.0 ÷ 4 = -2.5 • FS Average is + 6.0 ÷ 4 = 1.5 • Directional Vector Coordinates: x-axis: -2.5 + 4.0 = +1.5 y-axis: -4.5 + 1.5 = -3.0 • The Toledo Club should pursue Competitive Strategies Quantitative Strategic Planning Matrix (QSPM) 17
    • The Quantitative Strategic Planning Matrix (QSPM) is a tool to objectively indicate which alternative strategies are the best for the Toledo Club to pursue. When constructing the QSPM, the criteria and their relative weights from the Internal and External factor matrices are placed in the left hand column. At the top of the right hand side, strategic alternatives derived from the TOWS matrix are listed. An attractiveness score is then assigned to each strategic alternative based on how key external and internal success factors are capitalized or improved on. These values are then multiplied by the weights. The cumulative value of these weights shows the relative attractiveness of the strategic alternatives to each other. Three alternative strategies were evaluated against The Toledo Club’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. The first alternative strategy for the Toledo Club is to offer additional events and programs to its clientele. This can include but is not limited to cultural, corporate, and athletic programming. For example, The Toledo Club can sponsor a wine tasting event or provide sports clinics for squash players. The second alternative strategy is to make The Toledo Club more family friendly. In a struggling economy, families opt to join clubs where their children and spouses can enjoy themselves. The Toledo Club can begin to attract this type of clientele by transforming its unused rooms into a playroom for children and a salon/spa for women. The third strategy The Toledo Club can pursue is to update its facilities to reflect changes in technology. This can range from updating workout equipment to setting aside space for a lounge atmosphere with a flat panel television. These alternatives were scored on criteria from the IFE and EFE matrix. The results are provided in the table below. 18
    • Strategic Alternatives Family & Additional Children Events and Update Facility Friendly Programs QSPM Matrix Environment Key Factors Weight AS TAS AS TAS AS TAS Opportunities 0.15 3.00 0.45 4.00 0.60 2.00 0.30 1. Offer formalized/diverse program classes 2. Updated workout facilities 0.10 1.00 0.10 2.00 0.20 4.00 0.40 0.10 4.00 0.40 1.00 0.10 2.00 0.20 3. Use TC building as center for economic growth 0.20 2.00 0.40 3.00 0.60 4.00 0.80 4. Updated facility infrastructure Threats 0.15 4.00 0.60 3.00 0.45 1.00 0.15 1. Multiple product substitutes 0.10 2.00 0.20 3.00 0.30 1.00 0.10 2. Declining population of Toledo downtown 3. Changes in tax laws 0.05 - - - - - - 4. Decline in Toledo’s economy 0.15 - - - - - - Strengths 1. Reciprocity with other clubs 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 2.00 0.10 2. Name Recognition 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 2.00 0.10 3. Rich History/Building Architecture 0.05 - - - - - - 4. Affluent Members 0.05 4.00 0.20 3.00 0.15 1.00 0.05 5. Loyal Members 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 2.00 0.10 6. Networking Opportunities 0.10 4.00 0.40 2.00 0.20 1.00 0.10 7. High Class/ Historical Event Hall 0.05 3.00 0.15 2.00 0.10 4.00 0.20 8. Capable Staff 0.05 - - - - - - 9. Good Restaurants/ Good Food 0.10 - - - - - - 10. Many meeting Rooms 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 2.00 0.10 Weaknesses 1. Location 0.10 3.00 0.30 4.00 0.40 1.00 0.10 2. Declining Membership 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 1.00 0.05 3. Lack of Cultural/Business 0.10 4.00 0.40 3.00 0.30 1.00 0.10 Programs 4. Technology 0.05 1.00 0.05 2.00 0.10 4.00 0.20 5. Lack of Programming 0.05 4.00 0.20 3.00 0.15 1.00 0.05 6. Inadequate Marketing 0.05 3.00 0.15 4.00 0.20 1.00 0.05 Total Attractiveness Score 4.75 4.85 3.25 According to the results obtained by the QSPM, the most attractive alternative strategy is to make the Toledo Club more family and child friendly. The second most attractive strategy is to offer more events and programs to its members. 19
    • Conclusion: The Toledo Club is a well-established city club but has experienced a decline in membership due to its inability to adapt to the changing environment. The current membership age at The Toledo Club is significantly older then its competitors. The competition differs in two key ways. First, the competition is located closer to their members’ place of residence. Second, the competition offers in addition to more formal programs, a family oriented environment as compared to the Toledo Club. The Toledo Club membership will grow as it changes to meet the needs of those who are in the market for country club membership. Keeping the change of the demographics in mind, the Toledo Club needs to revise its strategy to attract the growing trend of families in the Toledo community. 20