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Outlining an oral presentation

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Transcript

  • 1. Outlining an Oral Presentation: THE BASICS Formal Outlining - Moving from a general idea to specific support
  • 2. How does an outline work?
    • Start with a general topic – informative or persuasive
    • Slice up that general topic into main points
    • Slice up the main point into sub points
    • Slice up the sub points into sub sub points
  • 3. How does an outline work? Let’s have a dinner party Pre-dinner The Dinner The Dessert Beer hors d'œuvre Wine Meat Coffee Cakes Vegetable Guinness Budweiser Shrimp Cheddar Cheese Merlot Chardonnay T-bone Hamburgers Potatoes Peas General  Less general   Specific    More specific
  • 4. What is the process of creating an outline?
    • Begin with a topic 
    Discover the focus and goal  Ask a question that the speech will answer  What are the main points  Cutting money from CUNY By the end of my speech I want my audience to KNOW ABOUT the budget cuts at CUNY. What are the new budget cuts at CUNY?
    • Why is there a need for these cuts?
    • What is being cut?
    • What is being done to stop these cuts?
  • 5.
    • Why is there a need for these cuts?
      • Less taxes
      • Housing bubble
      • Everything costs more
    • What is being cut?
      • Grants to students and professors
      • Fewer instructors
      • Less for technology
    • What is being done to stop these cuts?
      • ???
      • ???
    Then – Find at least two sub points for each Main Point Any supporting material here? – examples – statistics - testimony
  • 6. What is the process of creating an outline?
    • Begin with a topic  Teen Driving
    Discover the focus and goal  By the end of my speech I want my audience to be PERSUADED that teens should not be allowed to drive at 18 Ask a question that the speech will answer  What should be done about the problems of teen drivers?
    • What are the main points 
    • Problem created by teen drivers.
    • Why are they such bad drivers?
    • What should be done about this problem?
  • 7. Then – Find at least two sub points for each Main Point
    • Problem created by teen drivers.
      • Teens involved with a lot of car accidents
      • The younger drivers are the worst.
    Then – Find at least two sub sub points for each sub point – supporting material goes here  Examples – Statistics - Testimony
    • Problem created by teen drivers.
      • Teens involved with a lot of car accidents
        • According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration - teens make up 7% of nation’s licensed drivers - represent 14% of all motor vehicle fatalities.
        • Last year 8,666 people were killed in automobile accidents involving teenage drivers.
      • The younger drivers are the worst.
        • Insurance Institute for Highway Safety -16-year-olds have “highest % of crashes involving speeding, of single-vehicle crashes, & of crashes with driver error.”
        • USA Today reports that 16-year-olds are three times more likely to be involved in fatal crashes than are other drivers.
  • 8. What is wrong with this second main point of the “Teen Driving” outline?
    • There are three major causes of the problem.
      • One of the causes is inexperience.
        • New drivers haven’t had enough time on the road to develop their driving skills.
        • Inexperience is not the only cause—always inexperienced drivers.
      • Findings from the National Institute of Mental Health show that the brain of an average 16-year-old has not developed
        • H e or she is not able to judge the risk of a given situation.
      • A five-year study of traffic records by Steven Lowenstein, a medical professor at the University of Colorado,
        • Shows “deliberate risk-taking and dangerous and aggressive driving behaviors
        • Predominated” among 16-year-old drivers.
      • Third cause of motor vehicle fatalities among teenage drivers is night driving.
        • According to the Washington Post, when 16-year-olds get behind the wheel after dark, the likelihood of having an accident increases several times over.
        • Nighttime driving is less safe for everyone, but it becomes particularly dangerous when combined with a younger driver’s inexperience and reduced ability to gauge risk.
  • 9. What is wrong with this second main point of the “Teen Driving” outline?
    • B . Second cause is revealed by brain research.
      • Findings from the National Institute of Mental Health show - average 16-year-old brain- not developed - he or she is unable to judge risk of situation.
      • Five-year study of traffic records by Steven Lowenstein, a medical professor at the University of Colorado, shows that “deliberate risk-taking and dangerous and aggressive driving behaviors predominated” among 16-year-old drivers.
    • There are three major causes of the problem.
      • One of the causes is inexperience.
        • New drivers haven’t had enough time on the road to develop their driving skills.
        • Inexperience is not the only cause—always inexperienced drivers.
      • Findings from the National Institute of Mental Health show that the brain of an average 16-year-old has not developed
        • H e or she is not able to judge the risk of a given situation.
      • A five-year study of traffic records by Steven Lowenstein, a medical professor at the University of Colorado,
        • Shows “deliberate risk-taking and dangerous and aggressive driving behaviors
        • Predominated” among 16-year-old drivers.
      • Third cause of motor vehicle fatalities among teenage drivers is night driving .
        • According to the Washington Post, when 16-year-olds get behind the wheel after dark, the likelihood of having an accident increases several times over.
        • Nighttime driving is less safe – particularly dangerous when combined with a younger driver’s inexperience and reduced ability to gauge risk.

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