Marketing

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Marketing what you grow.

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Marketing

  1. 1. Marketing is the hard part! Or Don’t plant a seed until you have a market!!! Paul’s first rule of profitable farming
  2. 2. But…it helps to have beautiful produce and LOTS of it.
  3. 3. Customer Service is important!
  4. 4. And a wide variety of produce from the first market……
  5. 6. Through the middle….
  6. 8. Until the end….
  7. 10. The “other” season…
  8. 11. Sample Email Hi!  The following is what we will have for delivery on Saturday, December 15th.   If you want to place an order, please email us by midnight on Thursday evening.  Delivery will be made between 8 AM and 11 AM on Saturday morning.  If you are not going to be home but would like a delivery, please leave an insulated cooler in a protected area and we'll leave your produce there.  Please note that there is a $7.50 minimum order and there will be a $2.50 delivery fee added to all orders.     Our next delivery will be on Saturday, December 22nd .   Mesclun - This is a mixture of baby lettuce and mixed baby greens, washed, spun-dried and ready-to-eat!  First cutting, premium quality!   1/2 pound bag is $4.50 or 1-pound packaged in 1/2 pound bags is $8.00   Spicy Baby Greens Mix - For those of you who prefer a bit of "zip" in your mesclun, add a bag of our spicy baby greens mix to our mesclun.  It's our special blend of colorful, pungent, spicy greens.  1/4 pound bag is $2.50   Spinach - succulent, mouth-watering young leaves, just bursting with flavor $4.50 per 1/2 pound bag  These leaves are washed, spun dried, and ready to eat!   Braising Mix - A blend of flavorful greens, great for adding to a stir-fry.  $4.50 per 1/2 pound bag.   Arugula - Very young and tender, peppery green.  Try it with a balsamic vinaigrette with garlic and add a few walnuts for crunch.  $1.75 per bunch (about 2 ounces)  
  9. 12. Swiss Chard - young, beautiful colored stems and bright green leaves.  $1.75                       Here's a wonderful recipe for Swiss Chard from one of our friends:  It's pretty simple really.  I start by chopping the greens into pieces.  I like to cut the stems in larger pieces so they hold up a little better during cooking and still have a little bite to them when they are done.  I heat some olive oil in a skillet, maybe two tablespoons at the most, just enough to thinly cover the bottom of the pan, toss in the chard, salt and pepper, give it a good toss to get the leaves nice and coated with oil put a lid on and let it start to cook down.  When it's about half way done I put in 3 or 4 cloves of garlic that I've sliced really thin.  I cook that for a few minutes then add about a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and probably about 1/4 cup of red wine and then cook it uncovered until most of the liquid has evaporated.  It turns out fantastic every time.  We can't get enough.  I've even gotten a couple people who say they don't like spinach to try it, and love it.   Collards - large, blue-green leaves, mild flavored (limited supply) $2.00 per bunch   Kale -  White Russian - leaves just bursting with sweetness and flavor!  $1.75 per bunch (limited quantities available)   Pak Choi - white-stemmed, dark-green leaves, great taste!  Wonderful in a stir-fry, or fabulous on a fresh veggie platter! And new this fall...Red Choi!  Dark maroon leaves with green undersides.  $1.50 each   Tatsoi - beautiful dark green, spoon shaped leaves on light green stems.  Very mild tasting, good for you.  Eat it steamed over rice, or another great addition to a stir-fry.  $2.00 each   Napa cabbage - really, really crunchy and full of flavor - $3.00 each   Thank you!   Paul & Alison Wiediger
  10. 13. Close up of that customer’s recipe. Swiss Chard - young, beautiful colored stems and bright green leaves.  $1.75                      Here's a wonderful recipe for Swiss Chard from one of our friends:  It's pretty simple really.  I start by chopping the greens into pieces.  I like to cut the stems in larger pieces so they hold up a little better during cooking and still have a little bite to them when they are done.  I heat some olive oil in a skillet, maybe two tablespoons at the most, just enough to thinly cover the bottom of the pan, toss in the chard, salt and pepper, give it a good toss to get the leaves nice and coated with oil put a lid on and let it start to cook down.  When it's about half way done I put in 3 or 4 cloves of garlic that I've sliced really thin.  I cook that for a few minutes then add about a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and probably about 1/4 cup of red wine and then cook it uncovered until most of the liquid has evaporated.  It turns out fantastic every time.  We can't get enough.  I've even gotten a couple people who say they don't like spinach to try it, and love it.
  11. 15. Questions?

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