Angelica Piccolo&Amy Wegman
   Principles of Effective Math Teaching     Equity     Teaching     Learning   Constructivist Theory   Sociocultura...
   Developing reading comprehension     Before     During     After   Multicultural literature   Finding meaning in ...
   Understanding the Human Experience     Social     Economic     Political   Exclusion of women and minorities   Cu...
1.The book mentions relating mathematics to the world around us and making the   information relative to the students. The...
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Socio Presentation

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Socio Presentation

  1. 1. Angelica Piccolo&Amy Wegman
  2. 2.  Principles of Effective Math Teaching  Equity  Teaching  Learning Constructivist Theory Sociocultural Theory Assessment  Informal vs. Formal Reasoning  Reproduction  Connections  Analysis
  3. 3.  Developing reading comprehension  Before  During  After Multicultural literature Finding meaning in writing
  4. 4.  Understanding the Human Experience  Social  Economic  Political Exclusion of women and minorities Culturally relevant instruction  Current events  Technology  Multicultural perspectives  Critical thinking and writing
  5. 5. 1.The book mentions relating mathematics to the world around us and making the information relative to the students. The book example is Statistics and Probability which we know is used in everyday encounters. As a teacher how would you relate more complex concepts such as in Geometry when students are asked to prove that all circles are similar OR when you are explaining to students the properties of rational and irrational numbers? These concepts should also be related to society so students can see how the knowledge is relevant but how would you do this?2. Currently at the school where I am teaching, there is a heated debate about what the students’ summer reading should include. Some teachers believe that the assigned book should be chosen based upon student interest/enjoyment in order to motivate students to read, others believe that it should be non-fiction in order to expose students to an historical event or social issue that they otherwise would never read about on their own. What is your opinion? Which do you think would be more beneficial for a diverse population of students?3. Which topics in a US history class have the potential to be controversial within the classroom? Has a topic ever arisen within a past history/social studies class that has made you feel uncomfortable?

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