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(3.4.1.2)station design guidelines final 122309

  1. 1. South Florida East Coast Corridor (SFECC) Transit Analysis Station Design Guidelines Prepared for Gannett Fleming, Inc. On Behalf of State of Florida Department of Transportation By: Station Design Guidelines Station Design Guidelines
  2. 2. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1: Introduction to Corridor a. Project Location and Background b. Goals and Objectives c. Design Guidelines Intent d. Planning for Sustainable Growth: The Planning Process Chapter 2: Brief Corridor History Chapter 3: Design Guidelines Overview a. Intent of: i. Transit Today 1. Civic/Cultural Crossroads 2. Iconic Form 3. Redevelopment Energy 4. A Sustainable Future ii. Station Design Parameters: 1. Integration into the Community/Urban Fabric 2. Accessibility: a. Pedestrians and Bicyclists b. Transit (Other Modes) c. Kiss and Ride d. Park and Ride 3. Transparent and Functional Simplicity 4. Security/CPTED 5. Comprehensive Systems Sustainability 6. Articulation of Form and Community Identity 7. Arts-in-Transit Chapter 4: Station Typology and Modes a. Station Typology and Hierarchy i. City Center ii. Airport/Seaport iii. Town Center iv. Regional Park and Ride v. Neighborhood Center vi. Employment Center vii. Local Park and Ride viii. Special Events Venue b. Transit Modes: i. Commuter/Regional Rail ii. Light Rail iii. Bus Rapid Transit iv. Rapid Rail (Metro Rail) v. Regional Bus Table of Contents 1 2 4 6 7 14 18 18 19 20 20 21 23 28 34 50 20 72 24 38 54 66 74 22 25 31 42 58 68 26 33 46 62 70
  3. 3. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Table of Contents Chapter 5: Station Components: a. Typical Components of Station Areas b. Arrival Zone i. The Pedestrian Zone 1. Pedestrians 2. Bicycles 3. Greenways and Rail-with-Trails ii. Bus Drop-Off iii. Vehicular Drop-Off: Kiss and Ride iv. Park and Ride 1. Parking 2. Emergency Vehicle Access v. ADA Accessibility c. Travel Zone i. The Station 1. Station Building 2. Structure and Engineering 3. Support Buildings a. Restrooms b. Ticketing Booths c. Interior Waiting Spaces d. Concessions 4. Station Building Type Hierarchy ii. The Platform 1. Platform Layout 2. Sight Lines to and from Platform 3. Platform Canopy 4. Roofline Treatments and Materials 5. Drainage 6. Shading/Wind Screen and Climate Protection 7. Platform Access 8. Platform Amenities 9. Track Crossings a. At Grade Crossing b. Vertical Circulation 10. Components Summary Table 76 78 80 82 84 86 87 90 92 94 96 96 98 102 104 104 105 106 108 109 110 114 116 117 118 119 124 125
  4. 4. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 6: Elements of Design a. Information Systems i. Signage 1. Station Entry Statement 2. Station Identification 3. Informational Signage 4. Trailblazing Signage 5. Electronic Passenger Information Display Systems 6. Regulatory Signage ii. Advertising iii. Public Address Systems iv. Security Systems v. Wireless Technology Access b. Architectural Elements i. Style and Character c. Site Furnishings i. Seating ii. Bike Racks iii. Trash Receptacles iv. Bollards v. Planters/Flower Pots vi. Flagpoles/Banners/Pennants/Plaques vii. Tree Grates viii. Drinking Fountains ix. Vending Machines x. Ticket Kiosks xi. Hose Bibs d. Hardscape Surfaces and Materials i. Pedestrian Walkways ii. Pedestrian Crosswalks iii. Roadways iv. Parking v. Ramps vi. Plazas/Courtyards/Seating Areas vii. Platform e. Lighting i. Platform Area Lighting ii. Walkway, Elevator/Escalator and Stair Lighting iii. Parking Area Lighting iv. Landscape/Accent Lighting v. Lighting Control Systems vi. Electrical Convenience Outlets f. Design Elements Summary Table Table of Contents 127 128 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145
  5. 5. SFECC Station Design Guidelines g. Landscape Materials 1. Tree/Palm Relocation 2. Plant Material Selection/Design 3. Parking and Streetscape Plantings 4. Station Plantings 5. Rail Corridor and Right-of-Way Plantings h. Irrigation Chapter 7: “Green” Stations a. The Station as a Sustainable Entity b. Environmental Sustainability for the Site c. Environmental Sustainability for the Landscape d. Environmental Sustainability for Structures Chapter 8: Maintenance Guidelines Chapter 9: Appendix Table of Contents 146 127 127 148 127 127 149 151 154 156 158 160 165 177
  6. 6. 1Introduction to Corridor
  7. 7. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 12 Project Location and Background The South Florida East Coast Railway Corridor stretches along the eastern coast of the state of Florida and currently is in operation for the transport of goods and services related to the freight and shipment industry. The study corridor, as determined in the Phase 1 Study, is the 85- mile portion of the Florida East Coast Railway Corridor from Tequesta to Downtown Miami. The study corridor covers one (1) mile on either side of the existing FEC rail line and traverses three (3) counties (Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade). A total of 47 municipalities exist within the two (2)-mile corridor, of which 38 exist within one-half (½) mile of the FEC and 28 are directly on the FEC corridor. The first phase of the study was completed in 2008 and led to the launch of the second phase of the project. This second phase of the study further details and aligns the study area and goes into greater detail for classifying viable modes of transit for the FEC right of way that is now broken into three separate areas of utility. Following are the elements that were identified as a result of the first phase of the project: 1. Corridor The FEC corridor was identified as the study corridor after comparison to adjacent corridors (such as US-1, Dixie Highway, etc) as well as comparisons to various scenarios that included improvement to existing transit systems (such as bus transit, Tri-Rail, etc) and even a “no-build” option. The first phase helped align study efforts to the FEC corridor and recognized areas where further study was required. The SFECC Study Corridor
  8. 8. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1 3 2. Transit Technologies Multiple modes of transit were considered and narrowed to five modes for further refinement and study 3. Station Typology (8 Types total) Various types of stations were determined as suitable for the corridor based on various existing land uses and conditions as well as community needs and desires. These station types will be further discussed in more detail later in the report. 4. Station Locations Based on the various technical requirements determined by the transit system mode/ technology and various land use factors, potential station locations determined in the first phase of the study have been refined. The second phase of the study focuses on station typology, design, as well as the identification of potential station locations along the 85-mile corridor. Station locations in Phase 2 are based on station typology, technical and engineering requirements for the system based on the transit system modeling, land use, and community preference for specific station locations. The goal of the Design Guidelines and Criteria for Stations is to standardize the components and design process related to the various station types and modes to ensure a consistent approach and level of investment throughout the corridor. The guidelines will help guide the layout of a comprehensive system while also providing opportunities for the various municipalities in the corridor to incorporate their own distinctive elements (such as Arts in Transit) into the station design. The SFECC Phase 1 Report and 5 modes/transit technologies being further studied in Phase 2. Source: www.sfeccstudy.com
  9. 9. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 14 Project Goals and Objectives Trends indicate that the need for alternative transportation solutions that provide viable and sustainable growth opportunities are on the rise in regions, such as South Florida, that continue to experience growth and redevelopment. South Florida has experienced and will likely continue to experience both growth and redevelopment. Ridership of the recently expanded Tri-Rail (commuter rail) system continues to rise; however, preliminary studies by the Regional Transit Authority indicate that some demands exist along the densely populated eastern corridor of the region. The SFECC Transit Analysis Study looks at reintroducing passenger transit on the FEC corridor in order to provide inter-connectivity with other regional transportation networks that will help resolve the congestion and sustainable growth issues that the region is experiencing. Today, transit continues to serve as a sustainable tool that encourages a reduction in auto-dependent transportation corridors and uses and therefore encourages the preservation of natural resources and amenities. The South Florida metropolitan region extends along the eastern shore of the state of Florida and is unique in that it links three dense city centers, (i.e. Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach), each that serves as the hub of the three counties (i.e. Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach). The South Florida metropolitan region population ranks 7th in the nation, with an estimated population of almost 5.5 million in an area of approximately 6,000 square miles . Each of these hubs also operates their own major airport and seaport centers that provide wide- spread global connectivity to the region. The FEC passenger railway system is poised to capture on these connections and provide the type of intermodal connectivity and accessibility to mass transit that the region needs. Transit today faces multiple challenges that have to balance ridership needs with ongoing operating and maintenance costs. Additionally, a dedicated revenue source is crucial. Several key factors that go into a successful transit system include an integration into an overall multi-modal connectivity framework, including linkages to other forms of connectors that range anywhere from sidewalks and dedicated bicycle pathways to interstate highways to trolley and bus transit systems. Throughout the process, however, a balance also has to be achieved with a need for sustainable and best management practices as well as a pleasant and sometimes even engaging experience for the user. This is especially true in South Florida, as today , and into the near future transit riders still will have a choice to drive an automobile as the urban-scape has grown from an auto dependent paradigm.
  10. 10. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1 5 Following are the goals and objectives that the design and planning for the stations on the South Florida corridor should follow: • Provide innovative and user-friendly station facilities by incorporating supporting facilities such as concession areas, waiting rooms, restrooms, and ticket booths • Provide pleasant, covered platform areas and shelter from environmental and micro-climate factors prevalent in the region (i.e. sun/heat, wind, rain, etc) • Provide aesthetically pleasing and visually engaging surroundings that people will enjoy while waiting for the trains to arrive • Maintain quality design standards through the design and construction process so that station facilities will endure public use for many years • Provide secure and safe places for the commuter during the day and night • Provide that all areas are barrier-free for the physically challenged • Accommodate for safe and practical circulation methods between the various station components and parking/drop-off areas • Incorporate the use of sustainable planning, building, and implementation practices to ensure long-term use and cost-effectiveness while also encouraging an environmentally- sensitive approach Mockingbird Station, located just east of North Central Ex- pressway at Greenville Avenue and Mockingbird Lane, is allow- ing people to realize the full potential of this light rail station through recent retail and residential developments immedi- ately adjacent to the station. Source: http://www.nctcog.org/trans/sustdev/landuse/ex- amples/Mockingbird%20(DART).jpg Portland, Oregon’s MAX light rail system makes Pioneer Court- house Square a better place. Source: http://www.lightrail.com/photos/portland/portland05. jpg
  11. 11. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 16 Design Guidelines Intent The intent of the Station Planning and Design Guidelines is to provide a mechanism that simplifies the approach to station planning and also provides a comprehensive framework to ensure consistency and clarity of station design within the SFECC Transit system. The Guidelines also outline the optimal requirements for the building of efficient, functional, and coordinated station areas along the 85-mile corridor. To provide for a comprehensive understanding of the approaches and framework requirements, the guidelines steer the reader from the broader goals and objectives down to the specific building blocks that help achieve the common system requirements. It is important to note that the criteria in this booklet describe optimal design elements and conditions for the eight typical station types identified for the SFECC corridor. As the transit system continues to develop and station sites are identified for planning and design, the operating/management agency of the transit system may choose to only provide standardized basic amenities for each station type. It will thus be the responsibility of the individual municipalities and jurisdictional agencies to “upgrade” their station based on the recommendations made within this document, the SFECC Station Design Guidelines, based on community preferences, phasing, and overall costs. The SFECC Station Design Guidelines begin by describing the over-arching framework for station design and introduce the different station types that were established as part of the first phase of the study. The guidelines stress the importance of accessibility and functionality by incorporating diagrams that indicate basic relationships and components of the various station types proposed for the corridor. Next, the various requirements for the different elements required in station areas are described and range from platform area canopy structures to security cameras. Finally, prototypical station diagrams demonstrate the application of the guidelines and provide a visual guide to the process and approach. These applicability guidelines provide an impetus for creating a comprehensive and efficient transit system that contributes to the civic pride and identity of the diverse communities along the historic FEC corridor. The guidelines include eight chapters and appendices. They are as follows: 1. Introduction to Corridor 2. Corridor History 3. Design Guidelines Overview 4. Station Typology and Modes 5. Components of a Station Area 6. Elements of Design 7. “Green” Stations 8. Maintenance Guidelines 9. Appendices As innovations in the transit industry advance, the guidelines should also be reevaluated and updated at incremental stages to incorporate new and more sustainable trends and techniques. While the design guidelines provide basic criteria, it is also important that station design include room for cultural and artistic expression that garner civic pride and support in their community stations and the overall transit system.
  12. 12. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1 7 Planning for Sustainable Growth: The Planning Process The following paragraphs describe the recommended design and planning approach for specific station areas based on basic planning principles that begin identifying the goals and objectives and station locations through the design process to implementation. Step 1: Project Definition The planning process for Station Design begins first by defining the project goals, objectives, and area/location. At the beginning of Phase 2 of the SFECCTA Study, a series of station types were defined in order to address the needs of the transit system based on technical studies and community preferences. (Refer to Appendix A: Station Typology Memorandum by Gannett Fleming for a complete narrative on the various types) In addition, based on the criteria developed for the various types of stations, potential locations were also analyzed in accordance with GIS mapping of existing conditions and system technical/ scheduling requirements (as determined through transportation modeling systems). Through a combination of the various studies, a combined approach helped determine a potential list of stations and station types that were then discussed and evaluated with each individual municipality along the FEC Right-of-Way/ROW that had a potential station location. Furthermore, as part Phase 2, a strong focus remains on the FTA criteria and process for station selection which involves the assessment of transit- supportive land uses within the study corridor. The FTA criteria takes a comprehensive look at elements that are critical in the development of stations and surrounding areas such as pedestrian linkages, connectivity to major circulation networks (vehicular and other forms of public transit such as buses), character of surrounding development and urban patterns, and parking supply. Available potential implementation mechanisms are also examined through the study of economic conditions, relevant market data such as development patterns, and policies/plans that support transit development. As the ultimate client of the station area, an essential component of this first step is the continued integration of community and municipality input. Community meetings and design charrettes facilitate the needs and wants of the community and its stakeholders. They also help in gathering base data for the following design steps. One example of a community input process is the Visioning Workshop which aids in the creation of “vision diagrams” for the various communities and their needs and aspirations for transit development in their neighborhoods. Also integral is the involvement of the municipal governments and planning departments that help guide the station design process based on their community needs and desires. They also provide the official rules and regulations necessary for the planning process such as zoning, comprehensive land use plan requirements, permitting requisites and so forth. THE “DOTS” EXERCISE: Various boards with a variety of images were placed around the room. Participants were given blue stickers that they were asked to post next to their most favored ‘vision’ images.
  13. 13. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 18 Step 2: Site Reconnaissance and Inventory of Existing Conditions: The planning process for station design thus begins with site visits and a gathering, or inventory, of existing conditions and elements. Quantifiable elements are mapped in order to achieve station designs that integrate into existing conditions. Some of these elements include: • Land availability, i.e., vacant or under-utilized parcels • Sidewalk connections and character, i.e., widths, linkage potential, etc. • Transit stops within proximity to the potential station • Green way/trails connections • Parking capacity and facilities • Building stock and densities • Zoning and land use policies • Types and mix of uses • Streetscape and landscape components and other aesthetic elements, etc. • Connection potential to important historic, environmental, and/or community resources These broad characteristics are combined into a basic plan that will begin to establish the building blocks for the next stage in the process which identifies opportunities and constraints for the development of successful station areas and also helps determine the ingredients necessary to encourage the use of future transit stations. Step 3: Analysis: Identifying Opportunities and Constraints This second step in the planning process begins to delineate the various conditions created by existing inventory characteristics. The analysis process also establishes conditions for future development potential. A careful analysis of existing conditions reveals opportunities for improvement and identifies constraints that need to be addressed prior to station development. As part of the analysis stage, projections for future changes and revitalization effects of transit integration are also analyzed to ascertain the potential use and capacity needs. The analysis stage is therefore defined by an evaluation of the existing inventory and future conditions through a physical and qualitative analysis of physical and economic conditions. Physical conditions analysis also goes beyond the basic inventory of existing characteristics and considers environmental features such as climate (predominant winds, rainfall, temperatures, humidity), vegetation cover and characteristics, natural features of the land, slope and drainage patterns, boundaries, access, and views, and starts to establish relationships between the elements and various land uses within the site’s regional and local context. Along with the analysis of physical elements and the various opportunities and constraints that are reached as a result of this examination, another fundamental component to the planning exercise is an examination of the market and economic conditions. Economic probability studies establish target markets and project elements necessary to attract those markets. Market studies also help identify/survey competitive or comparable projects and provide insight into size needs, mix of components, costs, and any innovative design and implementation techniques used.
  14. 14. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1 9 Source: Sample station study process for the SFECC.
  15. 15. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 110 Step 4: Conceptual Planning The conceptual plan uses the conclusions developed through the analysis stage to create land use diagrams and alternatives that begin to define program elements and their relationships as well as basic capacity studies for the site. Review and input are provided during this process to ensure consistency with the visioning process and the goals and objectives set forth during the preliminary planning stages. This also allow the community and government agencies to make early development decisions and begin identifying specific program needs and requirements. The conceptual design phase also provides preliminary phasing strategies based on general development plans and costs as determined through the economic/market consultant. The economic consultant can also provide basic economic feasibility studies through a study of projected revenues, and capital investment as well as operating and maintenance budget requirements that can also determine cost/phasing alternatives. Step 5: Master Planning - Preliminary Refinements through Final Master Plan This phase refines the design direction derived from previous phases into site specific plans that begin to delineate scaled program elements as well as defined spaces, building footprints, architectural style, roadways, sidewalks, stormwater management techniques, etc. Preliminary plan alternatives offer options to the layout of the various program elements and these alternatives are then distilled into the Final Master Plan. The Master Plan is supported by detailed plans, sketches and other drawings such as perspectives, sections, and elevations that further describe the design intent including the relationship of vertical elements that are not as apparent in plan format. In addition to the Master Plan, development strategies are refined along with detailed project parameters, cost and revenue variables, and other supporting market and financial documentation reports. Furthermore, utilities and infrastructure needs are also mapped by the engineer at the Master Plan level. These plans delineate connections to the water supply, sewage and stormwater management, electrical supply and distribution, and solid waste disposal as well as other basic infrastructural needs for roadways and development. Step 6: Community Consensus and Agency Approvals Following the completion of a refined design package, the next stage involves the approval process that includes approval from the client, the stakeholders, and the various permitting, financing, and approval agencies. Additional documentation may be provided to address compliance needs with requirements and regulations for zoning, environmental permitting, planning guidelines, etc. The community consensus process can be beneficial to the approval process and helps demonstrate how the design meets the needs and desires of the users and stakeholders. This process can be conducted through workshops and informational meetings; and helps garner support for the project’s overall development and implementation. Public Workshop and Meeting
  16. 16. Introduction to Corridor SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 1 11 Step 7: Detailed Design: Schematic Design through Construction Documentation After the approval process and after the project is successful in gathering funding for ongoing design development, the following design phases take the project through to its final construction and implementation phase. • Schematic Design: In Schematic Design, critical areas are enlarged to incorporate detailed design features that begin to address materials and constructability. In addition, site sections and sketches are developed to illustrate critical relationships between various project components. Typically, architectural footprints and building elevations are incorporated into the Schematic Design Package along with engineering guidelines that address features such as stormwater drainage and other infrastructure considerations. Along with the design refinement, cost estimates are also fine tuned to monitor budget parameters along the incremental design phases. • Design Development: The next Detailed Design phase, Design Development, begins to address how the project will be built. Further examination of detailed plans and enlargements establish project “character” and “scale” and include general layout and grading, hardscape materials and detailing suggestions, lighting character, and landscape massing. Accuracy in detailing provides precise take-offs that help fine tune cost estimates and therefore allow budget decisions to be made prior to the preparation of the final Construction Documents. Similar levels of detailing and refinements are also provided by the architectural and engineering disciplines. • Construction Documentation: Once Design Development plans and budgets are approved, the final detailed design phase, Construction Documentation, commences. Construction drawings provide a complete package of information required for obtaining competitive construction bids from contractors. In addition to detailed construction drawings, construction specifications are also created in this phase. Specifications address specific technical standards and requirements for the construction and implementation process. The construction package details the following items at a construction level: 1. Landscape architectural components 2. Fully dimensioned layout plans 3. Surface grading and hardscape elevations 4. Hardscape and paving plans 5. Site features and furnishings details 6. Site Lighting Plans 7. Detailed Planting Plans 8. Irrigation Plans 9. General Notes and Requirements 10. Technical Specifications Construction Documents compile the overall design and implementation of a project into one package. Commensurate Construction Document Packages and refined cost estimates are provided by each discipline, i.e., landscape architecture, architecture, and engineering, etc. The Construction Package provides a comprehensive understanding on how a project is designed and built as well as how it will be operated and maintained. This fully documented package is sealed by each registered discipline and becomes the legal document of record for the construction of the project. • Implementation: The implementation phase guides the project from the bidding process, through the selection of a successful bid, construction and execution of the construction bid, and finally to the project opening. During the construction phase, the design team provides assistance and construction observation capability to ensure the successful implementation of the project and advises the client or project manager with answers to technical questions and queries. The implementation phase ends with the completion of the construction phase and the beginning of operations and ongoing maintenance of the project.
  17. 17. 2Corridor History
  18. 18. Corridor History SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 214 FEC History: The Growth of a Region The history of the Florida East Coast Railroad is one that tells the story behind the man that is also often referred to as the father of the region. Henry Morrison Flagler first envisioned bringing rail access to South Florida in the late 1800s, when much of southern Florida remained largely undeveloped and unknown. Flagler, a successful oil tycoon, saw the potential of South Florida as a tourist destination and as an emerging destination for those seeking relief from the harsh northern winters. In 1885, Flagler began building the Ponce de Leon Hotel in St. Augustine and realized that the “key to developing Florida was a solid transportation system.”1 Flagler began consolidating existing freight railway lines and applying a standard gauge system which made interconnection of the various lines possible. This first phase of railway lines created railroad links between Jacksonville and Daytona. Later Flagler was petitioned by landowners in the southern area of the state to build an extension of the railroad further south. After exploring the vast development opportunities in the south, Flagler began the process of extending the railroad south into what is now known as the South Florida Metropolitan Region. 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_East_Coast_Railway 2. Compiled by Janus Research, Inc. One of the last railroad extensions brought the FEC further south to the shores of Biscayne Bay. This extension helped establish the City of Miami which grew from a settlement of 50 people, to a city of over 400,000 today. Flagler then launched the ambitious Overseas Extension that took the railroad all the way to Key West, Florida. Flagler completed his mission and rode the first train into Key West in 1912. While the FEC was successful in establishing a passenger transit system in the region that lasted almost 70 years, with the consequent hurricanes and the Great Depression came major financial difficulties that eventually brought an end to passenger transit on the FEC. Many cities and towns that were established along the corridor, however, grew and prospered due to the railroad. Remnants of these historic stations and structures still exist today. The following cultural resources have been documented within 500 feet of the FEC corridor:2 • 2,155 Historic Structures (of which 339 are in the National Register for Historic Places-Listed/ Potentially Eligible) • 67 Historic Districts and Linear Resources (of which 45 are in the National Register for Historic Places-Listed/Potentially Eligible) • 16 Archaeological Sites (of which eight [8] are in the National Register for Historic Places- Listed/Potentially Eligible and Native American Sensitive) Miami station with the Freedom Tower in the background-1930’s Miami-1930’sJupiter station- 1910’s Dania Beach station- 1910’s
  19. 19. Corridor History SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 2 15 • Seven (7) Historic Cemeteries (of which six [6] are in the National Register for Historic Places- Listed/Potentially Eligible and Native American Sensitive), and • Seven (7) Historic Bridges (of which one [1} is in the National Register for Historic Places-Listed/ Potentially Eligible) Included in these cultural resources are actual remnants of the historic FEC railroad such as the FEC Railway Passenger Stations in Boca Raton and Hialeah. Others include the National Register- listed Freedom Tower and City of Miami Cemetery in Miami as well as parts of documented historic districts within Biscayne Park, Miami Shores, El Portal, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach. While the corridor carries a rich and vibrant history from its early days, today the FEC operates as a freight rail carrier that owns and operates:1 • 351 miles of mainline track between Jacksonville and Miami, Florida • 277 miles of branch, switching, and other secondary track • 158 miles of yard track ______________ 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_East_Coast_Railway Recognizing the need for passenger transit opportunities along the eastern coast of the South Florida Region, the South Florida East Coast Corridor TransitAnalysis(SFECCTA)Studywasstartedin2005 to study the potential of reintroducing passenger rail on the FEC tracks in support of the existing Tri-Rail Commuter Rail and Amtrak Rail services. As the first phases of the environmental and land use studies took place, it became overwhelmingly apparent that reintroducing passenger transit on the FEC tracks would be a positive opportunity for the sustainable growth of the region, while reviving the history and tradition that was lost due to post-industrialization. Engine No. 1034 breaks the tape on track No. 3 in Miami marking 75 years of Florida Special New York-Miami service 1963. Florida States Archive Source: http://www.pbase.com/ Fort Lauderdale station-1956Pompano station-1930’s
  20. 20. 3Design Guidelines Overview
  21. 21. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 318 Transit Today: The role of transit today spans many facets of day- to-day lives and creates positive and lasting effects through social, visual, fiscal and environmental impacts. These broad impacts are further described in the following pages. Civic/Cultural Crossroads: Development trends in the last few decades indicate that investment in transit and the resurgence of downtown areas continue to rise with shifting market demands and lifestyle preferences. As urban areas continue to grow, so does the demand for convenient travel modes that provide alternatives to congested highways and roadways. This shift toward denser and what is known as “transit-oriented development” has allowed transit to once again become an integral cultural element in many communities across the country. Transit Oriented Development, or TOD, is defined as “compact mixed-use development near transit facilities and high-quality walking environments.” Through various funding mechanisms, TODs have become economic engines which are helping revive investment of transit systems within communities across the country. With the continued development of transit systems in many urban cities such as Dallas, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Denver, Portland, and St. Louis, transit has begun to transform the post- industrialization trend toward suburban auto- oriented communities. Today, transit centers and stations experience the intermingling of the masses and serve as vital links. Transit’s role was best described by David Moffat in his publication, The Art of Modern Transit Station Design, “Extensions of the cities around them, they (transit stations) provide common ground for a common purpose and they give dignity and excitement to thousands of individual ceremonies of departure and arrival each day”. Iconic Form and Urban Identity: Along with being integral elements of the connective tissue within transit systems, transit stations also often incorporate connective layers between multiple modes of transportation. The hierarchy of connections occurs mostly at main station centers within dense urban areas and these centers therefore become opportunities for expression of iconic form and distinct design. Iconic-precedent stations such as Grand Central Station in New York City and Union Station in Washington, D.C. offer a nexus of transportation networks, which support public services and design, and culminate in iconic public spaces. Memorable iconic public spaces spark redevelopment and economic revitalization. Downtown Plano Station Source: https://www.dart.org/images/pressreleases/Down- townPlanoStationAerial.jpg
  22. 22. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 19 Redevelopment Energy: Transit stations serve as economic catalysts and models for sustainable development. TODs today offer compact development choices with the direct fiscal benefits derived from increased ridership and its associated revenue gains which enhance community amenities. These benefits include the increase in neighborhood and housing market vitality, i.e., affordable housing choices, increased fiscal benefits for joint development opportunities, and enhanced property values for adjacent land and business owners. According to a recent study published by the Transit Cooperative Research Project, joint development of station properties that leverage transit infrastructure, such as ground leases and operation-cost sharing, encourage and foster “community and development partnerships,” promoting economic development and smart growth. A Sustainable Future: Transit-oriented development is responsible for significant investment in building a sustainable and environmentally-sensitive planet. Alternative forms of transportation reduce the increasing demand of roadways, and, therefore, work toward a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. Mass transit modes, such as rail, continue to be the most efficient and environmentally-friendly way to address the increasing mobility demands from people and their modes. In studies done by the UIC, the International Union of Railways, rail is four (4) times more efficient for passenger transport (based on average carbon dioxide emissions) when compared to car and plane. In terms of the transport of goods, rail freight operations result in eight (8) times less carbon dioxide emissions than the use of trucks and four (4) times less than the use of inland waterway barges. Overall, “rail is on average, 2 to 5 times more energy efficient than road, shipping, and aviation.” and “travelling by rail is on average 3 to 10 times less CO2-intensive compared to road or air transport.” Although not a recent development, the role of transit in sustainable development continues to advance with new “green” methods and technologies and the use of renewable energy resources (biomass/waste, hydro, wind, etc.). The fundamental environmental benefits of transit: 1. Reduce land consumption for roadways 2. Decrease the use of automobiles, which improves air quality, and reduces consumption of natural non-renewable resources and fossil fuels (coal, oil, gasoline, etc.) 3. Compact development methods encourage land conservation and decrease travel demand 4. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from roadway construction and expansion projects 5. Improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists 6. Diminish auto-dependency, saving energy and reducing roadway congestion
  23. 23. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 320 Station Design Parameters: Transit station planning and design is comprised of six (6) principles delineating the parameters of a successful station. The methods include, integration into the contextual fabric, accessibility via multiple modes, functional simplicity, security, comprehensive systems sustainability, articulation of form and identity and finally the incorporation of arts in transit. The features of these parameters are discussed in greater detail. Integration into the Contextual Fabric: One of the basic components of station design factors is where a station responds to its surroundings through architectural elements. These surrounding factors include appropriate design measures to provide protection from environmental and climatic elements such as wind, rain, heat, etc. In addition, transit station design should also be sensitive to its context and associated cultural factors. A well-integrated station works symbiotically with its context to provide facilities and amenities to the passengers as well as surrounding residents and business owners. Incorporation of transit-compatible uses, such as day care centers, dry cleaners, shoe/watch repair shops, coffee shops and small restaurants, provide increased incentives for the public to use transit and also create revenue mechanisms for the transit system (i.e. through space lease agreements, etc). Transit stations also offer unique opportunities for cultural integration through the designation of open spaces and plazas that can serve as dynamic gathering nodes within the urban fabric. Finally, stations often become iconic landmarks for the community and whether it is through the use of vernacular architecture or local building materials and methods, the transit station should relate to the user and the user’s environment. Station architecture and detailing should also create an inviting, safe, and comfortable environment for its users to encourage greater and more frequent use of the transit system. Transit also plays an important role in the development and redevelopment of communities, and their existing networks, on both a local and regional scale. These networks usually consist of multiple modes of mobility ranging from pedestrian pathways, bicycle routes, railroad corridors, and major arterial roadways. While transit covers a range of modes, its basic premise involves the movement of people and goods. This basic idea is what enables the various modes of transportation to interconnect and, therefore, provide greater capacity and range of movement. An example would be a light rail system that connects to a regional commuter rail system and also links to local bus transit. A wider audience is reached, thus a greater ridership is achieved. Accessibility: Accessibility to a wide range of users is a key factor in transit station design. Accessibility is defined by the ease of use or approach to a particular space or area. Therefore, in a transit station, access is the ability of various groups to use a facility. These user groups include pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, commuters, and the mobility- and sensory-impaired population. Each group has its own criteria and requirements which are described in greater detail in the following pages. Crowd attends ribbon-cutting ceremony of Adelaide’s new central-city extension to Glenelg tramway. Source: http://www.lightrailnow.org/features/f_ade_2007- 11a.htm
  24. 24. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 21 Bicycle pathways are also integral to the pedestrian connectivity system, and should be clearly distinguished from vehicular areas for safety. In addition, similar to pedestrian connections, bicycle networks should provide clear links and access points for the users. Bicycle Stations with locker rooms for the storage of bicycles and bicycle rentals can provide further use of bicycles near and around station sites. All station areas should comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines Code of Federal Regulations. These requirements outline basic criteria for barrier-free and accessible design for customers with special needs, such as the mobility- and sensory-impaired. These standards also provide access benefits to other types of passengers requiring assistance (such as parents with children in strollers, passengers with luggage, etc.) ADA Accessibility Guidelines and Regulations have been included for reference in Chapter 9 - Appendix. 1. Pedestrians and Bicyclists: Pedestrians should receive the highest priority since they are the primary users of transit systems and stations. Pedestrian environments should be designed with safe, clear, and unobstructed connections to the station area. “Non-fragmented and integrated pedestrian paths to the station will encourage more customers to walk and can increase ridership without the need for additional parking facilities or bus service.” A comfortable pedestrian environment also encourages greater use of the transit system and enhances the overall perception of a station area. Pedestrian routes to the transit station should be short, direct, and continuous. Comfortable walking distances range from ¼ to ½ mile and are generally links between various nodes that range from neighborhoods to major public gathering spaces and destinations. Pedestrian circulation routes should also be at street level and provide separation from vehicular circulation routes to minimize areas of conflict. Pedestrian pathways need to be visible and well-lit for safety of the users. Finally, pedestrian networks should incorporate connectivity to pedestrian trails and other regional networks such as greenways. Areas where pedestrians congregate (waiting areas) and connections to the main station area should be designed to offer shade and protection from weather elements such as wind, sun, and rain. Discover how you can have a negative carbon footprint on the planet and a positive “carbo” footprint on your body at the same time Source: http://detours.us/images/2009%20toocan%20 juicy%20cameo%201%20crop%20A%20sm1.jpg Seat-in-coach transfers to other destinations are arranged at fixed departure times Source: http://www.siamleisure.com/assets/images/bus.gif
  25. 25. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 322 2. Transit (connections to other transportation modes/systems): Intermodal transit connections with bus and rail systems, such as local and express bus systems, generate higher volumes of passengers and users, and should be located within close proximity to station areas. These connections usually refer to various modes of public transit that have established routes or dedicated ROWs and operate on a set schedule. Transit connections can include links to local bus routes, bus rapid transit, other rail, and even trolley/ tram systems as well as others. To encourage transit use, pedestrian access and amenities should also be provided within a radius of ¼ to ½ mile around transit stops. 3. Kiss and Ride: Next in terms of access hierarchy are the drop-off and pick-up areas commonly known as “Kiss and Ride”. Kiss and Ride facilities also require proximity to the station area and typically include short-term parking. A kiss and Ride facility encompasses various vehicular modes of transportation such as taxi stands, private shuttle buses, and automobile drop-off/pick-up areas. In larger stations with high passenger volumes, taxi stands are often located separately from vehicular drop-off areas. Facilities can also include “paratransit” services, i.e., a curb-to-curb public transportation service for users with disabilities who are unable to use other forms of public transit. Paratransit vehicles are usually equipped with wheelchair lifts and other devices that make them ADA accessible. 4. Park and Ride: Finally, Park and Ride facilities denote stations that are primarily accessed by vehicles and therefore include substantial parking areas for longer range commuters. These facilities are generally located in less dense areas where land is more easily available and in areas with direct connections to regional Connections are clearly marked at the station’s exit. Source: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/zOTn2MQU- Wef0NUzdgVjcLw You can get free public transportation when you park at the Park n’ Ride Garage Source: http://www.keywestcity.com/egov/gal- lery/861206625094153.JPG The Gare du Nord (Northern Train Station) is situated north of central Paris. Source: http://parisfrance.ca/images/trainstation.jpg
  26. 26. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 23 AMTRAK’s Acela Specialty Station Signage Program Source: http://www.segd.org/images/content/4/1/41138.jpg roads and connectors (such as arterial roads connecting to major interstates). However, overtime redevelopment will occur around the stations. Park and Ride facilities incorporate larger-scale circulation networks between parking areas and the actual stations and are often located at end- of-the-line stations. In both regional and local Park and Ride stations, taxis stands should be separated and clearly delineated from automobile drop-off areas to assure safe and clear mode transitions for passengers. Functional Simplicity: Another fundamental criterion for a transit station is clarity and ease of use. Crucial design components should be organized logically so the average user is able to accomplish basic tasks from reaching the station area, to identifying their transit needs, purchasing the ticket, and boarding the train. The reverse situation is also applicable, where a transit user gets off the train, is guided to other transit interchanges, the destination, or parking areas where his/her car is parked. This incorporates the use of good design, and appropriate information systems available in prevalent languages of the region (English, Spanish, etc.) Transit technology has improved globally to allow better access and circulation to transit systems and also allows clearer transition between various modes. Recently, regional transit systems in South Florida, such as Metro Rail (Miami) and Tri-Rail have upgraded to the “Easy-Pass” system. The “Easy Pass” is a form of an automated fare collection system similar to what many transit systems across the world use to make transit more user-friendly and also reduce some of the operating costs associated with fare purchase and collection. The purchase of a transit card such as the “Easy-Pass” allows the user to charge their card for the desired amount of trips. Cards can be programmed to allow for unlimited trips within various time frames (such as weekly/monthly/annual passes) and for automatic recharge. The transit card holder simply swipes their card through card readers at faregates (at controlled entry portal areas) which allows them access onto the platform and to the transit system. The transit card can also be made to allow the passenger universal access onto a variety of transit modes such as regional and local bus systems, rail systems, and so forth. The OV Chipkaart (Public Transportaton Chipcard) allows the user to access mulitiple transportation systems (bus, rail, metrorail, tram, etc) in the Netherlands. Source: www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread. php?p=45433315
  27. 27. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 324 Security: User safety and security are key components when designing a successful public space. CPTED, or Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, is a planning tool based on the premise that the proper design and effective legitimate use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the incidence and perception of crime. The four (4) key principles of CPTED are (adapted from “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design: General Guidelines for Designing Safer Communities” by the City of Virginia Beach Municipal Center, January 20, 2000): 1. Access Control: Physical guidance of people coming and going from spaces by the judicial placement of entrances, exits, fencing, and landscaping. In addition, locating public gathering areas as centrally as possible or near major circulation paths in the project. 2. Natural (Passive) Surveillance: The placement of physical features, activities, and people in such a way as to maximize visibility. 3. Territorial Reinforcement: The use of design elements that express guardianship, such as fences, pavement treatments, art, signage, landscaping, and lighting. 4. Maintenance: Serves as an additional expression of ownership, and prevents lack of visibility from landscape overgrowth and inoperative lighting. Security issues have become the focus and priority of public planning projects and CPTED guidelines help steer the planning of safer public amenities and environments. However, it is important to note that Local Building Codes and federal security criteria (such as perimeter security requirements for large government buildings/facilities) may prescribe more stringent criteria and would take precedence over CPTED guidelines. Design for these security- This ATM is placed well, using good CPTED features and has an unobstructed view from the street and patrolling police. Credit: Randy Atlas Source: http://www.popcenter.org/tools/cpted/images/ cpted_atm.jpg In order to implement automated fare collection systems such as the Easy-Pass into the SFECC system, stations will have to be equipped with faregates as well as ticket/transit card vending machines at key stations as well as at retail locations for purchase and recharge by the user. Stations will also have to be designed to allow for controlled entry and exit points in order to guide users through the faregates. Additional design considerations, such as barriers and fencing, should be considered to help funnel users from surrounding areas into the station. Automated fare collection systems will also allow accurate count of passenger trips and be able to process trip information that can assist in better transit planning and future improvements to the system. Information systems, utilizing signage and other graphics, an also make transit more user-friendly and help guide a passenger from one area to another; for example from parking areas to the station platform. Train schedules and system information should also be easily accessible and comprehensible to the user. (See Chapter 6 for additional information on Information Systems.) Finally, public facilities such as accessible toilets/ washrooms, and telephone booths, should be distinguishable and centrally located within the station area. (The relationships between the various components inherent to station areas are further described in Chapter 5.)
  28. 28. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 25 Emergency Assistance Credit: Jeremiah Cox Source: http://www.subwaynut.com enabling elements should be incorporated in such a way as to encourage the use and functionality of the station area. The U.S. Department of Transportation and Federal Transit Administration require that transit systems implement Security Standards and Guidelines early in the design stages to assess vulnerability of station systems and areas to threats and hazards. The report, “Transit Security Design Considerations” FTA 2004, (can be found at http:// transit-safety.fta.dot.gov/security/SecurityInitiatives/ DesignConsiderations/default.asp) addresses safety and security design considerations and assists in “developing an effective and affordable security strategy following the completion of a threat and vulnerability assessment and development of a comprehensive plan”. The SFECC Transit Agency should establish a security plan and certification system for the system to address security and safety standards in: • Programming and Planning (i.e. to determine if facilities are built, inspected, and tested in accordance with applicable codes, standards, criteria, and specifications”) • Training of Personnel and emergency response organizations An example of the various steps of System Security Manage- ment and Implementation. Source: The Public Transportation System Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Guide, U.S. Department of Transportation- Federal Transit Planning Guide January 2003 • Infrastructure and Facilities (i.e. signage, emergency telephones/communication devices, alarms, key controls and locks, protective barriers and lighting, electronic surveillance systems, and so forth) Other important documentation regarding safety and security guidelines for transit systems are listed below: • The Public Transportation System Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Guide, U.S. Department of Transportation- Federal Transit Planning Guide January 2003 • Handbook for Transit Safety and Security Certification, U.S. Department of Transportation- Federal Transit Administration Office of Safety and Security, November 2002 • Hazard Analysis Guidelines for Transit Projects, U.S. Department of Transportation- Federal Transit Administration Research and Special Programs Administration, January 2000 • Recommendations for Bridge and Tunnel Security, The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Transportation Security Task Force, Prepared by The Blue Ribbon Panel on Bridge and Tunnel Security, September 2003
  29. 29. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 326 Grand Central Terminal, second busiest rail station in the country. Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/com- mons/7/71/Image-Grand_central_Station_Outside_Night_2. jpg •NFPA 130 - Standards for Fixed Guideway Transit Systems •ADAAG- Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines and ADA Title II and Title III Regulations •FACBC- Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction •ANSI 117.1 - Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities •Codes of Applicable Jurisdictions (City Zoning Ordinances and Development Standards) •CPTED - Crime Prevention through Environmental Design •SFECC Engineering and Technical Requirements Comprehensive Systems Sustainability: Incorporating environmental and economical sustainability into station design begins during the early planning stages through land use and zoning analysis. Environmental sustainability and the guidelines for building “Green Stations” are addressed in more detail in Chapter 7 of this report. Transit should be located in areas where travel demands are forecasted as well as where land uses coexist and support the development of a transit station. Transit can also be the mechanism used to spark redevelopment, thus spurring compatibility. Integration into future land use plans should also be identified during the early planning stages. Along with other design parameters, station areas also need to comply with local standards and guidelines. Some of the important standards and regulations include, but are not limited to: •Building Code Local Jurisdiction – Florida Building Code •South Florida Building Code (Broward Edition) •South Florida Building Code (Miami-Dade Edition) •Fire Prevention Code Local Jurisdiction •FDOT Design Standards •County Association of Government Standard- Uniform Specifications and Details for Public Works Construction Local Jurisdiction Supplements •NEC- National Electrical Code •NFPA 70 - National Fire Protection Association •NFPA 101 - Safety from Fire n Buildings and Structures
  30. 30. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 27 own thoughts, people may adopt an unexpected addition to their known space as an icon, reject it as alien, or see it as something in between. Public art is perceived in the context of its site, but even within the relatively homogeneous stations, artists choose different placements as well as forms. Unfortunately today, aside from art galleries, and large public gathering plazas, there is little visual art on public transit lines and stations. In order to appropriate positive public art influences in transit station areas, the overall goals for the selection of pubic art for the SFECC corridor should include the following: 1. The installation must offer an opportunity for public engagement, while arousing curiosity and interest. Communities will learn to embrace the art and murals within their area, and inspire surrounding communities to bring creative projects into their own everyday neighborhood life. 2. The installation in some visual and/or conceptual way, should enhance the experience of place. For example, public art at certain stations can celebrate the heritage and history of the community and its relationship to the FEC Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture on Sixth Avenue, New York. Source: http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1164/870131940_ f56062503f.jpg?v=1203902106 Articulation of Form and Community Identity: Transit stations are integral to the public realm and include elements that represent civic pride and identity. Major transit hubs and stations can themselves become iconic architectural spaces and buildings. Iconic stations such as Grand Central Station in New York City, and Union Station in Washington D.C. are renowned transportation gateways and civic structures. A majority of transit stops and stations are day-to-day gateway areas and address the needs of millions of commuters traveling between destinations, and between homes and workplaces. These stations have the ability to embrace and portray the civic character of the area and influence of surrounding communities and jurisdictions. A very integral element in stations is the expression of ‘public art’ that enhances the visual appeal and aesthetic quality of the station’s basic building blocks and criteria. Public art is defined as art outside museums and galleries, or art on its own without institutional protection. It provides a broad range of visual experiences for often radically diverse audiences. Most transit art is permanent, commissioned through a public process, and then funded according to a percentage of station construction or renovation costs. Many individuals and committees are involved; and the artists are usually chosen by professional panels. Transit stations offer an abundance of opportunities for interpretive public art, especially because they also serve as a community center, where one can find information on local exhibits, housing and dining. There is potential for emphasized excitement in these places, particularly when the community is invited to learn the many ways artists work. The prospect of presenting art to unsuspecting commuters and causing them to converse about visual art in the stations is stimulating and intriguing to passengers. Furthermore, the commuting user waiting for a train provides a captive audience. Immersed in their
  31. 31. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 328 the room can be emphasized with artistic furniture, providing riders with a startlingly different place to sit. The user is provided with a more comfortable place to sit as well as something amusing to look at, with enough variety to engage multiple viewings. The Waiting Area Walls and Semi-Covered Corridors: Walls, even if outside, are traditional places for art. They define the immediate visual parameters of the viewer’s space. Public wall art competes with advertising public announcements, and the larger immediate built environment. These corridors offer the greatest opportunity for art since the commuters never miss the displays. The possibilities allow for a tunnel effect where a person could be completely surrounded by a visual effect. The Platform The station platform, in stark opposition to the covered corridor, offers an open visual field where riders wait. Artistic columns can attract the eye as riders either walk or gaze around the platform. Also, ground plane engravings can be added, a simple yet artistic touch that does not vertically break the pedestrian traffic flow. railroad corridor. Many cities had their downtowns emerge along the tracks and some still have historic station structures and museums dedicated to this historic legacy. 3. Increase aesthetic value and impact of station areas through appropriate and selective use of Art in Public Spaces. 4. Enhance citizens’ sense of ownership, pride, and enjoyment of the SFECC as a public amenity. 5. Engage the community and youth in art selection and appreciation programs that help improve quality of life and encourage creative expression. 6. The installation must invite and reward repeat encounters. The following are some specific locations and opportunities for public art within the station area: The Station Building and Waiting Areas: If there is a station waiting room that shelters the transit audience indoors, and they have the time, Art adds to the dyanamic feel of Times Square. Credit: Roy Lichtenstein, Times Square Mural, 2002, Times Square-42nd Street. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, Source: www.tfaoi.com/aa/5aa/5aa325.htm
  32. 32. Design Guidelines Overview SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 3 29 Arts in Transit: Several major transit systems across the country have programs that collaborate and manage the incorporation of art into the transit system. The program often is a means of community outreach and becomes a “catalyst for enabling neighborhood residents to weave the stations into the fabric of their community.” (St. Louis Metrolink Arts in Transit Program: www.artsintransit.org). The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York City also manages an extensive public arts program. The objective of the program is that “every design element in the system should show respect for the customers and enhance the experience of travel”. Therefore, ‘art’ is expressed through a variety of media and materials that are durable, and easily maintained. While some are consided as permanent pieces, other art exhibits rotate regularly. New and innovative art media include music performances, posters and art cards, and lightboxes that highlight the work of local photographers. Funding for Arts in Transit programs and similar public arts programs is usually allocated as a percentage of the implementation costs (design and construction) of a public works project. For example, in creating “vibrant and neighborhood- oriented transit facilities”, the Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) “commits 1% of the design and construction costs for the integration of art into most projects in the capital program, including stations and surrounding areas, park and ride lots, transportation centers, maintenance facilities, and passenger amenities.” “Bright, vivid photographs enliven subway passageways and the underground environment, and showcase the work of primarily New York - based photographers.” Source: http://www.mta.info/mta/aft/lightbox/ Victor Johnson and David Stephen’s art work displayed at 60th Street Station of Philadelphia’s SEPTA system is funded through SEPTA’s Art-in-Transit Program which combines the Federal Transit Administration and City of Philadelphia: Per- cent for Art initiatives. Source: http://www.theelseptaatwork.com/ArtInTransit.html The South Florida region does not have a specific art program related to transit, however, several venues exist that offer a podium for public art funding and awareness such as Miami-Dade’s Art in Public Places. A comprehensive listing of city and county public art programs in the state of Florida can be found on http://www.florida-arts.org/ resources/cityandcountypublicartprograms.htm. As the SFECC transit system matures in South Florida, an Arts in Transit program can be formed to be the guiding authority for the incorporation of Public Art into the transit experience. Similar to the successful programs across the country, the SFECC Art in Transit Program should “commission art works that seek to reflect the diversity and individual character of the surrouding communities and neighborhoods”. (http://www. theelseptaatwork.com/ArtInTransit.html)
  33. 33. 4Station Typology and Modes
  34. 34. SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 432 Land Use FEC Corridor Diagram 18 A Land Use study was completed in Phase 1 of the study highlighting existing transit-supportive land uses within the corridor.
  35. 35. Station Typology and Modes SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 33 STATION TYPOLOGY AND HIERARCHY: The following are the various station types determined in early phases of the SFECC Transit Analysis project. These station types were identified by the types of communities where they are located, as well as those requirements based on service and access needs. These station types have been grouped into a hierarchal group that ranges from Anchor Stations which are major destination stations, to Key Stations and Intermediate Stations. The following is a list of the station types and groups: Anchor Stations: 1. City Center 2. Airport/Seaport Key Stations: 3. Town Center 4. Regional Park and Ride Intermediate Stations: 5. Neighborhood 6. Employment Center 7. Local Park and Ride 8. Special Events Venue The following diagrams depict typical applications for each station type within the SFECC corridor. These broad diagrams are not site-specific. However, they depict typical conditions present in the corridor and thus provide broader relevance. Each station type is composed of various components and relationships for access and circulation which remain constant; however, these components can be modified to fit site specific conditions since each station area will present a different set of opportunities and constraints. Therefore, the diagrams on the following pages should be used as guiding tools only and not as specific plans for each station site. In addition, at this stage of the phasing process, various modes (which also carry different variables) are being considered for the corridor. The following diagrams depict station typology (eight [8] types listed previously) based on the Commuter Rail (or Regional Rail) mode. After the diagrams, a brief description of the four (4) other modes under consideration, Light Rail, Bus Rapid Transit, Rapid Rail, and Regional Bus, and their typical applications is provided.
  36. 36. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 434 Station Types City Center1 City Center Stations Located within a dense urban area and serving as a gateway for the heavy volumes of downtown commuters and city bus routes, the City Center is primarily a destination station. Accommodating large volumes of pedestrians and connections with taxis, buses and other high volume transit in this area is key. Wider sidewalks and an entry plaza with added visual interest, i.e., special paving details, landscape beds, etc., should frame the entrance to the City Center Station and the platforms. People should be funneled from on- street activities and the bus drop-off area into the station’s amenities, for example the ticket booth, restrooms, plaza with seating and/or food kiosks. The surrounding buildings should serve the users at the station through additional ground-level pedestrian amenities such as restaurants and shops. Since this station is predominantly a destination station, no dedicated parking is required. If desired, parking can be available in the surrounding existing parking structures as a shared resource with surrounding development. Taxi drop-off and pick-up areas can be provided in front of the station, but must not interfere with the bus drop-off area. Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: Floor Area Ratio greater than 10 • Residential Zoning: Greater than 25 Dwelling Units per Acre • Parking Restrictions: Less than space per 1,000 Square Feet Station Requirements • Site Acreage: Less than one (1) Acre • Transit Access: All services • Parking: No dedicated parking EXAMPLE OF FAR >10
  37. 37. Functional Diagram TRAIN PEDESTRIAN PLAZA STA- LOCALROAD LOCALROAD MID-RISE BUILDING RETAIL OFFICE RESIDENTIAL HIGH-RISE BUILDING RETAIL OFFICE HIGH-RISE BUILDING RETAIL OFFICE HIGH-RISE BUILDING RETAIL OFFICE BUSDROP-OFF OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE BRIDGE STATION (in existing building) STATION (in existing building) OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE LOCAL ROAD LOCAL ROAD AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING MIN.100’ TAXIDROP-OFF PLATFORMINTERGRATEDINTOTHEBUILDING PEDESTRIAN PLAZA MIXED USE MID-RISE BUILDING (RESIDENTIAL/ RETAIL/OFFICE) MIXED USE MID-RISE BUILDING (RESIDENTIAL/ RETAIL/OFFICE) MIXED USE HIGH-RISE BUILDING (RESIDENTIAL/ RETAIL/OFFICE/ GOVERNMENT SER- VICES) MIXED USE HIGH-RISE BUILDING (RESIDENTIAL/ RETAIL/OFFICE/ GOVERNMENT SER- VICES) FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) 500’PLATFORM SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 35 Commuter Rail-City Center (Express Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  38. 38. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 436 City Center Some station types are meant to improve mobility while maintaining existing community character. Center city stations are major intermodal centers, the focus for bus and pedestrian activity. These stations are often integrated into high-rise office buildings. Nearby development is in mid- to high-rise buildings, and can be a wide variety of uses. Well-designed pedestrian environments have wide, land- scaped, contiguous sidewalks. Mixed use high- rise building Station platforms between tracks to accommodate express and local service Station in existing building At-grade pedestrian crossing
  39. 39. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 37 Local road Mid-rise building Pedestrian gathering space Station in building Bus drop-off Outdoor public space Taxi Drop-off High visibility pedestrian crossing
  40. 40. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 438 Station Types Airport & Seaport2 Airport/Seaport Station These stations are often both ‘origin’ and ‘destination’ stations. They serve travelers such as tourists and visitors, as well as employees and other local passengers. Shuttle drop-off and waiting areas are directly linked to the station and also connect passengers to the airport/seaport facility. Where plausible, a vegetation buffer may separate the station from the collector road. To assist travelers, especially those with luggage, an ideal layout for the station area would provide a more direct connection between the station and the airport/seaport facility via a moving walkway. However, existing conditions may not always allow for this convenience. Station Requirements • Site Acreage: Less than one (1) Acre • Transit Access: Local and Express services • Parking: No dedicated parking Station Area Zoning • No zoning requirements unless combined with another station type
  41. 41. Functional Diagram STATION CANOPY 500’PLATFORM PLATFORM PLATFORM MIN.100’ AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING STATION BUSDROPOFF&WAITINGAREA COLLECTORROAD VEHICULAR CONNECTOR TO AIRPORT/SEAPORT POTENTIAL PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CONNECTOR TO AIRPORT/ SEAPORT CONCOURSE OR INTERMODAL CENTER POTENTIAL PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CONNECTOR TO PARKING STRUCTURE FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) COLLECTOR ROAD SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 39 Commuter Rail-Airport & Seaport (Express Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  42. 42. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 440 Airport and Seaport These stations ideally provide direct access to the airport/ seaport facility. When not located at an airport or seaport, access is provided by a people mover. Dedicated shuttle buses also facilitate access between stations and airport/seaport destinations. Bus/Airport shuttle drop-off and waiting area Station platform Pedestrian walkway Station tower with ticket booth Pedestrian bridge connection to parking struct
  43. 43. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 41 ture Parking structure Airport Pedestrian bridge connection to airport Colllector road
  44. 44. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 442 Station Types Town Center3 Town Center Stations Located on urban collector roads that form “Main Streets” of smaller urban areas, these stations are both ‘origin’ and ‘destination stations.’ Since these stations are typically walkable and offer a multitude of pedestrian amenities (for example, restaurants, ticket booths, restrooms, and areas for outdoor commercial activities), they should be located and incorporated into an existing environment that has a network of sidewalks promoting pedestrian accessibility. The Town Center accommodates a multitude of transportation types, thus offering Kiss and Ride, taxi and bus drop-off areas. Limited parking that does not block any drop- off areas should be provided on the surrounding streets. Shared surface parking and /r structure parking should be made available in lots behind all support buildings. Pedestrians on foot can then walk through the additional amenity areas within the support buildings. Note: Town Centers may have different intensities along the corridor. Some stations will resemble neighborhood stations in size, while others will be larger, and closer to City Centers. Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: Floor Area Ratio greater than 2.5 • Residential Zoning: Greater than 15 Dwelling Units per Acre • Parking Restrictions: Less than 1.5 spaces per 1,000 Square Feet Station Requirements • Site Acreage: 1/2 - 2 Acres • Transit Access: Local services, Express services • Parking: 50-200 spaces (surface or structure) EXAMPLE OF FAR > 2.5
  45. 45. Functional Diagram KISSAND RIDEAREA STATION KISSAND RIDEAREA OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE SHARED PARKING (SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE) ONSTREETPARKINGONSTREETPARKING COLLECTORROAD PLATFORMPLATFORM 500’PLATFORM BUSDROP-OFFAREABUSDROP-OFFAREA EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE SHARED PARKING (SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE) PEDESTRIAN PLAZA PEDESTRIAN PLAZA EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING EXISTING MIXED USE BUILDING TRACK AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) STATION KISSAND RIDEAREA KISSAND RIDEAREA LOCALROAD LOCAL ROAD (OPTIONAL BRIDGE CROSSING) MIN.100’ OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 43 Commuter Rail-Town Center (Local Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  46. 46. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 444 Town Center The semi-circular building of condos over commercial is the heart of the Beaverton Round. Town Center Stations are sited on urban collectors in smaller- scale mixed-use areas. Stations are designed to fit in to the built environment of the town center. Town Center Stations are in walkable areas with a full network of sidewalks. Station platform Station tower with ticket booth Optional above-grade pedestrian crossing At-grade vehicular crossing At-grade pedestrian crossing
  47. 47. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 45 Pedestrian gathering space Mixed-use buildings Outdoor public space Support buildings including bike racks and lockers Shared parking Bus drop-off Kiss and Ride On-street parking Structured parking surrounded by mixed-use buildings Collector road
  48. 48. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 446 Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: Floor Area Ratio greater than six (6) • Residential Zoning: Greater than 25 Dwelling Units per Acre • Parking Restrictions: Less than 1.5 spaces per 1,000 Square Feet Station Types 4Regional Park and Ride Regional Park-Ride Station These stations are located on principle arterial roads with close connections to larger highways and interstates. Regional Park and Ride Stations serve large volumes of riders from outlying communities. Similar to local Park and Ride Stations, safe pedestrian connections must be designed to circulate people from drop-off areas and parking lots/structures to the station entrance. Kiss and Ride and Bus Drop-off areas should be placed closest to the station entrance followed by parking. As vehicles and buses are diverted from the major arterial road, separate one-way roads help minimize traffic congestion around drop-off areas. Sites suitable for large at-grade parking lots do not exist within the study corridor; therefore, structured parking options within station types, such as the Regional Park and Ride, need to be examined. Land dedicated to parking requirements can also be an opportunity for future redevelopment. Areas for surface parking should potentially incorporate the feeder bus routes which may be rerouted into the station to provide convenient passenger transfer. Station Requirements • Site Acreage: Five (5) Acres or greater • Transit Access: Local services • Parking: 600-2000 spaces (surface or structure) >2000-space parking structure required COMMERCIAL ZONING FAR > 6
  49. 49. Functional Diagram ARTERIALRAOD SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE/ POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE/ POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE/ POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE/ POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING/ PARKING STRUCTURE/ POTENTAIL MIXED-USE PEDESTRIAN PLAZA 500’PLATFORM BUSDROP-OFFAREA KISSAND RIDEAREA KISS AND RIDE/ SHORT TERM PARKING STATION COLLECTOR ROAD MIN.100’ AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING STATION FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 47 Commuter Rail-Regional Park and Ride (Express Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  50. 50. Prototypical Plan Regional Park and Ride SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 448 Areas surrounding regional park-ride stations should be zoned to encourage denser future development. Regional park-ride stations should be accessible directly from major highways or major arterials. Station platform Parking area with future development potential
  51. 51. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 49 Parking structure lined with mixed- uses Station with ticket booth Covered bus drop-off* Surface parking lot for short-term, carpool and van pool parking Parking structure lined with mixed-uses Kiss and Ride Taxi drop-off *Note: If a covered drop-off area is not plausible under building/ structure, a covered canopy should be provided at a minimum between the bus drop-off and the station.
  52. 52. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 450 Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: No requirements • Residential Zoning: Greater than Eight (8) Dwelling Units/Acre • Parking Restrictions: No requirements Station Types 5Neighborhood Neighborhood Station The Neighborhood Station is located on local roads within a residential area. It is an ‘origin’ only station and services a relatively low volume of people from surrounding communities, the residential neighborhood itself and convenience retail services. The users are filtered into the station and platform area, either on foot via the the surrounding sidewalk network system, or through the bus drop-off area. Drop-off for a local circulator can also be provided with direct connection to the station. Parking will be provided on surface lots at a scale which will fit into the surrounding community and not create traffic issues on local streets. Pedestrians can then cross local traffic lanes and access the station entrance. Preferably, the surface parking should be shared with any multi-use commercial/residential development, or institutional use such as a church. Station Requirements • Site Acreage: 1/2 - 1 Acre • Transit Access: Local services • Parking: 50-100 spaces (single-use surface) EXAMPLE OF RESIDENTIAL DENSITY > 8 DU/ACRE
  53. 53. Functional Diagram EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK EXISTING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK EXISTING MIXED-USE BLOCK SHARED PARKING LOCAL ROAD BUS DROP-OFF AREA LOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKING STATION STATION LOCALROAD LOCALROAD DROP-OFFAREA DROP-OFFAREA FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) 500’PLATFORM AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING MIN.100’ LOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKINGLOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKING SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 51 Commuter Rail-Neighborhood (Local Stations) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  54. 54. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 452 Neighborhood Station Neighborhood Stations do not disturb the context of residential neighborhoods. Neighborhood stations often have minimal facilities that blend into the community. Housing types can be diverse and accommodate a mix of single-family and multi-family units. Existing residential block Shared parking Existing mixed-use or institutional-use block Station with ticket booth Local road with on-street parking Station platform Existing bus station
  55. 55. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 53 Existing residential block Pedestrian crossing Collector street At-grade vehicular crossing At-grade pedestrian crossing Kiss and Ride Station with ticket booth Station platform Kiss and Ride Drop-off for local circulator (City Shuttle)
  56. 56. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 454 6Station Types Employment Center Employment Center Stations These destination stations serve suburban centers of employment, for example, office parks, hospital complexes, college campuses, large mixed-use centers, and shopping centers. Employment centers close to the station will require direct sidewalk connections for pedestrians, while those further away may not be walkable, but would be within shuttle bus access. A plaza area should be incorporated into the front of the station and the surrounding bus and shuttle drop-off areas. Due to high traffic volumes at these stations which tend to be at peak periods during the work week, morning arrival, lunch, and evening departure, the station plaza can accommodate a larger proportion of people in a short period of time. Since this station is predominantly a destination station, no dedicated parking is required. If desired, parking should be available in the surrounding existing parking structures. Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: Floor Area Ratio greater than 2.5 • Residential Zoning: Greater than 25 Dwelling Units per Acre • Parking Restrictions: Less than 2.25 spaces per 1,000 Square Feet Station Requirements • Site Acreage: Less than one (1) Acre • Transit Access: Local services • Parking: No dedicated parking COMMERCIAL ZONING FAR > 2.5
  57. 57. Functional Diagram LOCALROAD STATION CANOPY PLAZA 500’PLATFORM COMMERCIAL & OFFICE BUILDING OFFICE BUILDING EXISTING EMPLOYMENT CENTER (I.E. HOSPITAL COMPLEX, SHOPPING CENTER, UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, ETC) EXISTING EMPLOYMENT CENTER (I.E. HOSPITAL COMPLEX, SHOPPING CENTER, UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, ETC) PLATFORM PLATFORM MIN.100’ FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) COMMERCIAL & OFFICE BUILDING COMMERCIAL & OFFICE BUILDING BUS/SHUTTLEDROP-OFFAREA AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING LOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKING LOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKING COLLECTOR ROAD SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 55 Commuter Rail-Employment Center (Local Station) Note: Some stations may be more or less remote VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  58. 58. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 456 Employment Center Commercial/Office building with ground-level parking Bus/shuttle drop- off area Station with ticket booth Station platform Pedestrian crossing Pedestrian gathering space At-grade vehicular crossing At-grade pedestrian crossing
  59. 59. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 57 Employment centers can be office parks, hospital complexes, universities, or other large mixed-use centers. No dedicated parking is needed at employment center stations; parking can be shared. Surrounding buildings are 3-5 stories or above with surface or structured parking. Local road with on-street parking Collector street Commercial/Office building Existing/future employment center Local road Kiss and Ride
  60. 60. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 458 Station Types Local Park and Ride7 Local Park andRide Station Located on collector roads, these stations handle moderate volumes of traffic, mainly accessible by cars and buses. Safe pedestrian connections must be designed to circulate people from drop-off areas and parking lots or structures to the station entrance. Kiss and Ride and Bus Drop-offs, should be placed closest to the station entrance followed by short-term parking. As vehicles and buses are diverted from the major arterial road, a one-way road helps minimize traffic congestion around drop- off areas. Surface and structured parking for the station should be buffered by buildings where possible. Parking and drop-off areas may also incorporate appropriate vegetation buffers separating vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian areas. The surface parking should incorporate the feeder bus routes. Also, zoning should be updated to encourage Transit Oriented Development/TOD around stations in the future. Thus parking lots could be future development sites for TOD within appropriate regions. Station Area Zoning • Commercial Zoning: Floor Area Ratio greater than 2.5 • Residential Zoning: Greater than 15 Dwelling Units per Acre • Parking Restrictions: Less than 2.25 spaces per 1,000 Square Feet Station Requirements • Site Acreage: Two (2) to six (6) Acres • Transit Access: Local services • Parking: 200-600 spaces (surface or structure) COMMERCIAL ZONING FAR > 2.5
  61. 61. Functional Diagram BUSDROP-OFF KISSANDRIDEAREA COLLECTORROAD 500’PLATFORM AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING STATION MIN.100’ FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) SURFACE PARKING / PARKING STRUCTURE / POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING / PARKING STRUCTURE / POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING / PARKING STRUCTURE / POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING / PARKING STRUCTURE / POTENTAIL MIXED-USE SURFACE PARKING / PARKING STRUCTURE / POTENTAIL MIXED-USE COLLECTOR ROAD ARTERIALROAD PEDESTRIAN PLAZA SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 59 Commuter Rail-Local Park and Ride (Local Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  62. 62. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 460 Local Park and Ride Station access should be from a collector or minor arterial street. Parking areas should be located within close walking distance of the station. Appropriate landscape buffers should be used around parking areas. Stations should be connected to surrounding development by sidewalks or walking paths. Station platform Parking area (with future development potential) Station with ticket booth Landscaped buffer At-grade vehicular crossing At-grade pedestrian crossing
  63. 63. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 61 Continuous sidewalk and bicycle pathway connection to central station and platform from parking area Surface parking lot for short-term and carpool/van pool parking Station with ticket booth Support buildings including bike racks and lockers Bus drop-off Kiss and Ride Parking structure Parking area with future development potential Taxi drop-off
  64. 64. Figure Diagram SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 462 Station Types Special Events8 Special Events Venue Station These stations need to be expressly designed to accommodate the specific venue they facilitate, i.e., a stadium or arena. The station and surrounding areas will have to simultaneously manage large crowds for short periods of time. Pedestrian bridges can be used to link people from the stadium and/or venue building to the transit station and platforms. No transit-related parking is necessary unless the station functions as another type in addition to serving as an events venue. If the stadium or venue is located within a dense mixed-used urban environment, parking may be shared with other surrounding structured parking. If possible, a pedestrian bridge should be used from the parking structure to the station and the stadium or venue. Station Requirements • Site Acreage: No dedicated acreage requirement • Transit Access: Local services and express services • Parking: No dedicated parking Station Area Zoning • No zoning requirements unless combined with another station type
  65. 65. Functional Diagram STADIUM / ARENA MIXED USE MIXED USE ADDITIONAL PARKING (SURFACE PARK- ING OR PARKING STRUCTURE COLLECTORROAD ARTERIAL ROAD AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING MIN.100’STATION STATION FEC SHARED CORRIDOR (100’ R.O.W) 500’PLATFORM LOCAL ROAD WITH ON STREET PARKING LOCAL ROAD WITH ON-STREET PARKING LOCAL ROAD WITH ON-STREET PARKING BUSDROP OFFAREA SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 63 Commuter Rail-Special Events (Local Station) VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE VERTICAL CIRCULATION/ABOVE GRADE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ( OPTIONAL DEPENDING ON EXISTING CONDITIONS) VEHICULAR PARKING
  66. 66. Prototypical Plan SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 464 Special Events Venue With the exception of event days, these stations are quiet and primarily serve the local community. Venue parking can sometimes be shared with commuters. These stations are designed to facilitate large volumes of passengers leaving events at the same time. Pedestrian bridge connection to Arena, Station, Parking structure Bus drop-off Arterial Road Arena/Special Events Venue
  67. 67. SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 65 Station Tower with ticket booths at ground level Station platform At-grade pedestrian crossing At-grade vehicular crossing Collector road Parking Structure
  68. 68. FECSHAREDCORRIDOR (100’R.O.W) EXPRESSPASSENGER &FECFREIGHT FECSHAREDCORRIDOR (100’R.O.W) FEC FREIGHT SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 466 Prototypical Plan Commuter Rail Transit Alternative Transit Modes: Currently, five (5) separate modes of transit are being assessed for the SFECC Transit System. Each mode carries a set of requirements that may vary depending on the type of technology and final system design parameters. Therefore, variations will occur with the types of stations for each mode. A brief description of each mode and its general requirements follows: 1. Commuter Rail or Regional Rail (RGR): a. A railway-based premium transit system comprised of push-pull train sets/locomotives pulling un-powered passenger cars or self propelled rail cars (DMUs) that carries commuters between destination and origination centers. Commuter rail typically operates in an exclusive ROW and typically serves corridors 20 miles or greater in length. Commuter rails can share tracks with freight trains and Amtrak. (Tri-rail is an example of commuter rail in South Florida) b. Commuter rail will share four (4) tracks with the Florida East Coast Railroad and will serve both Express and Local services. Depending on the station type and the types of services accommodated at the station, platform-to-track configurations will vary between center and side platforms. c. Platform lengths are typically 500’ in length and must be ADA accessible. Side platforms are a minimum of 20’ in width and center platforms are a minimum of 25’ in width. d. Pedestrian Crossings: Crossings for pedestrians are typically at-grade and run along existing street intersections with connections to the platform areas. Setbacks may vary, but a minimum safe distance of 100’ is required between the platform end and the at-grade pedestrian crossing. Above- grade pedestrian crossings can also be used in higher volume stations where surrounding structures provide direct connection into above- grade pedestrian crossings, i.e., catwalks, pedestrian bridges, etc. Note: Diagram shows typical platform configurations for the Commuter Rail mode. Variations may occur depending on specific site conditions. Platforms should be designed for high-level boarding to ensure universal accessibility and compliance with ADA guidelines. Station platform Station entry Station platform Station entry
  69. 69. MIN. 100’ COMMUTER RAIL PLATFORM (500’ LENGTH, WIDTH 25’) MIN. 100’ COMMUTER RAIL PLATFORM (500’ LENGTH, WIDTH 20’) SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 67 Local Commuter Rail Express Commuter Rail Two (2) Center Island Platforms Two- (2) Sided Platform VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN PLATFORM CROSSING
  70. 70. FECSHAREDCORRIDOR (100’R.O.W) FEC FREIGHT LRT SFECC Station Design GuidelinesChapter 468 Prototypical Plan Light Rail Transit 2. Light Rail Transit (LRT): A railway-based form of rapid- or semi-rapid transit comprised of diesel or electrically powered mechanical units. These units operate in exclusive or semi-exclusive ROWs and also have the capability to operate in mixed roadway traffic but must be separated from freight tracks (corridor sharing). Examples of light rail systems include Metro Transit in the Minneapolis/St. Paul region, and the TriMet System in Portland, Oregon. The following are basic station requirements for LRT. a. Light Rail will operate on two (2) dedicated tracks and will typically employ center platform configurations. Two (2) tracks will only accommodate one (1) tier of local service. b. Platform lengths are typically 300’ and the center platform is a minimum of 25’ in width. c. Pedestrian crossings will typically occur at street intersections and a minimum setback of 30’ is required between platform ends and street crossings. Above-grade pedestrian crossings may be utilized in higher volume stations. Grade crossings can also be used at platform ends where allowed. Platform end crossings need to have a security fence, which prevents pedestrian traffic from crossing over into the FEC freight tracks. Note: Diagram shows typical platform configurations for the Light Rail mode. Variations may occur depending on specific site conditions. Station platform Station entry
  71. 71. LRT PLATFORM (300’ LENGTH, WIDTH 25’) MIN. 30’ SFECC Station Design Guidelines Chapter 4 69 VEHICULAR CIRCULATION LEGEND PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION BUS / TRANSIT CIRCULATION FEC CIRCULATION SECURITY FENCE AT GRADE PEDESTRIAN PLATFORM CROSSING One (1) Center/Island Platform

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