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Learninqskills in lab2

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  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Presenter Notes: The Arkansas Center for Effective Parenting/AR State PIRC (CEP) is a collaborative project of the Jones Center for Families, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/Department of Pediatrics, and Arkansas Children’s Hospital. The Center for Effective Parenting serves as the Arkansas State Parental Information and Resource Center (PIRC), which is supported by the U.S. Department of Education (Grant #84.310A). The purpose of the CEP is to broadly disseminate a continuum of parenting information, support, and training activities. One of the objectives of the CEP is to develop and disseminate a series of parent presentations designed to increase parent involvement in their children’s education and to strengthen the partnership between home and school. The purpose of this presentation is to help parents understand the different elements that can affect learning and grades and to provide some practical ideas they can use to help their children improve their grades. This presentation is designed to fit within a typical parent meeting. The training materials include 34 visual aides, a presenter script, a participant handout, and an evaluation form. At a speaking rate of 100-120 words per minute, the presentation should take about 30 minutes (about 2800 words), not including introductory and closing comments, additional non-scripted comments, and question/answer time. The handouts follow closely with the visual aides and script. The script is written at a beginning 8 th grade reading level. [Introductory comments] Most parents want their children to learn and get good grades. What can you do when your child’s grades are low and your child is not working up to his or her potential? There are no simple formulas that would apply to all students.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide This talk is designed to give you an overview of the different elements that can affect learning and grades. Children with low grades may have problems in one or more of these elements. I will be providing you some ideas and resources to help address problems in each element. In particular, we fill focus on ideas to improve work habits and skills. Time does not allow us to go into too much detail in all the areas of work habits and skills. We will cover increasing class participation in some detail. I will refer you to other workshops like this or written material to cover the other areas related to work habits and skills. In the final two parts of this talk, we will briefly talk about your role in teaching your child work and study habits and how you and your child can work with the teacher to find out why your child’s grades are low. This information will help you determine where your child needs help. Let’s look at the different elements that can affect learning and grades.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Teachers typically arrange the content and pace of their classroom program around the “average” student. You can expect a student with average learning and attention abilities that is motivated and uses good work habits and skills to be successful with learning and grades. Problems in one or more of these areas can show up as lower grades. As indicated by the arrows in the figure, each element affects and relates to the others. In order to get good grades, each element needs to be working well enough. Let’s take a look at each of these child aspects that can affect grades. We will take a brief look at the first three. If your child is having problems in these areas, I will direct you to additional resources that might help. We will spend more time looking at work habits and skills.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide The first child element that is important in learning and grades is learning ability. A person’s mental ability or intelligence is the ability to gain and apply knowledge. Tests that measure intelligence are generally good predictors of success in school. Through teaching, students learn specific knowledge and skills. Achievement is the term that is used to describe this type of learning. Schools and clinics can measure a student’s mental ability and specific learning skills by special tests. Intelligence or IQ tests measure mental ability. Tests given at school, such as group achievement tests, can measure a student’s learning. In general, you can expect a student to learn or achieve specific skills, such as math and reading, at a rate similar to his or her mental ability. For example, you can expect a student with “average” mental ability to learn an “average” amount of math skills. If your child is doing poorly in school, you should talk with the school principal or your primary care physician about whether additional testing would be helpful.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide The next child element is attention ability. In school, students have to sit still and pay attention for long periods of time. Some students have problems with keeping their attention focused over time. Some students have trouble sitting still and being quiet. Students with these problems can have difficulty getting their class work and homework completed. If you think your child has problems with attention and hyperactivity you can ask for an evaluation from your school or primary care physician.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide A student’s motivation to learn can also affect school performance and grades. Motivation is what drives students to stay engaged in learning. It involves student beliefs about their skills and about what the results will be if they try. It also involves the value of learning to the student. What parents and teachers expect, communicate, and do with students has a powerful effect on motivation to learn. The AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting has a workshop like this one entitled Increasing Your Child’s Motivation to Learn that discusses some of the important issues in understanding what motivates students to learn and what you can do as a parent to increase your child’s motivation to learn. The information is also available in written form on the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting’s website. Just log onto the center’s website and you can print out the booklet.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Finally, the element of work habits and skills involves the behaviors that the student must do to learn and get good grades. What it takes to learn is not a mystery. Learning requires repetition across time. The key words in this statement are repetition and time. For example, we learn phone numbers by repeating the numbers to ourselves many times across many occasions. Students have chances to repeat information they are trying to learn in three key activities: classroom participation, homework, and studying for tests. Problems in one or more of these areas can lessen the amount of repetition and decrease learning. Students will need to discipline themselves to participate in class and spend regular time in doing homework and studying for tests. In doing this, they will need to use specific organizational, work and study methods.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Let’s look at some ideas and resources for improving your child’s work habits and skills.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide We will look at these four areas. I will just provide an overview of the first three areas and direct you to some additional resources. We will spend a little more time on the area of improving classroom participation.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Homework provides an important chance for students to repeat skills taught in school. Research shows that students who do homework learn more than those that do not. In addition, the more time a student spends doing homework, the more learning takes place. As a parent, you play an important role in helping your child do their homework on their own and on time. If your child needs help in this area, the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting has a workshop like this one entitled Homework: How to Motivate Your Child . The information is also available in written form on the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting’s website. Just log onto center’s website and you can print out the booklet.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Studying for tests at home provides another important chance for students to repeat material taught in school. Since studying for tests at home is not always required by the school, you need to help your child develop this habit. Learning requires repetition across time ; therefore, it is best for your child to begin studying several nights before each test rather than “cramming” the night before. It is also important for your child to use good study skills during his or her study time. Effective studying requires many different skills. You can teach these skills to your child as early as elementary school. As a parent, you play an important role in teaching your child to spend the time to study and to use good study skills. If your child needs help in this area, the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting has a workshop like this one entitled Strengthening Your Child’s Home Study Skills that has things parents can do to help their children learn specific home study methods. The information is also available in written form on the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting’s website. Just log onto center’s website and you can print out the booklet.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide In order to regularly do homework and study at home, students will need to plan ahead and get their books and papers to and from school. Disorganization can be part of the cause of poor grades. Organization and planning ahead are learned skills. Children often have a hard time organizing themselves and staying motivated to practice good organization skills. You play an important role in teaching your child how to stay organized and in keeping them motivated to practice the skills. If your child needs help in this area, the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting has a workshop like this one entitled Improving Your Child’s School Organizational Skills that has things parents can do to help their children write down assignments, bring home books and materials, keep track of papers , and plan ahead. The information is also available in written form on the AR State PIRC/Center for Effective Parenting’s website. Just log onto center’s website and you can print out the booklet.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Participating in classroom activities provides a critical opportunity for learning new skills. It gives students the chance to repeat information they are trying to learn. Participation helps students make deep, meaningful connections in the mind that are important in learning.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Participating in class involves several types of behavior, such as paying attention and staying on task, responding to questions the teacher asks, participating in group discussions, asking questions, seeking help, and making good use of class time.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide Signs of problems with classroom participation can include low grades, incomplete work coming home as homework, and low grades on classroom papers. If your child often does not know how to do homework, this could be a sign that he or she is not participating well in class. Teachers typically assign homework as a drill or repetition of skills already taught in school. Teachers are the best judge of your child’s level of class participation. There are many possible reasons why a child does not participate, including a withdrawn personality style, problems in learning and attention, low motivation, and bad experiences from past participation.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide You will need to talk with your child about the different ways he or she can participate in class. You may need to show your child how to participate. If your child is having a hard time participating, discuss the reasons why. Some children that are shy and timid may need lots of strong encouragement to help them overcome their worries about participating more.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide The third step is to monitor your child’s level of class participation. Let your child know that you will be talking with the teacher about his or her level of participation for the week. Let your child know that you will be looking for improvement. Talk with the teacher at the end of the day. You can do this through a phone call, note system, or personal contact. Do the same at the end of the week. You can use the questions from the previous slide as a guide. As your child’s class participation improves, you want to make sure you connect any improvements in work with increased participation. This will help your child see the value in participating.
  • Improving Your Child’s Learning and Grades Slide A good place to start is for you and your child to talk with the teacher about how the final grade is calculated. You will want for find out at least these four things: What elements goes into the final grade How many of each elements there are How many points each element is worth How your child did on each element A grade in a course is usually made up of several elements such as those listed here on the slide; however, every class may be different. Find out what specific elements are included in the subjects with low grades. Find out how many of each element there are for a reporting period.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Improving your learning skills and grades Presented by SAMBA SIVA SIVA SAMPOORNA GANGA RAJU CHANDRA SHEKAR
    • 2. Purpose• Elements that can affect learning and grades• Improving work habits and skills• Teaching work and study habits• Assessing the problem
    • 3. College Environment and Child Aspectsand elements that can effect grades Home and college Environments Child Aspects Learning Ability Motivation Attention Ability Work Habits and Skills
    • 4. Learning Ability Mental Ability Learning Success in college “Intelligence” “Achievement” The ability to gain Reading Gradesand apply knowledge Math Language IQ Tests Writing Subject knowledge Group or individual achievement test
    • 5. Attention Ability• Problems paying attention• Difficulty sitting still and being quiet• Interferes with college performance• Ask for an evaluation from college or primary care physician
    • 6. Motivation• Motivation: What drives students A resource for to stay engaged in learning improving student• Motivation involves: motivation – Student beliefs about their skills – Beliefs about what the result will be if they try – Value of learning to the student• Strongly influenced by what parents and teachers expect, communicate, and do
    • 7. Work Habits and Skills• Behaviors that the student must do to learn and get good grades• Learning requires repetition across time. – Classroom participation – Homework – Studying for tests• Discipline• Organization, work and study methods
    • 8. Purpose• Elements that can affect learning and grades• Improving work habits and skills• Teaching work and study habits• Assessing the problem
    • 9. Improving Work Habits and Skills• Homework• Studying skills• Organization• Class participation
    • 10. Homework• Key opportunity for students to A resource for repeat information taught in school managing• Students who do homework learn homework time more than those that do not• The more time a student spends doing homework, the more learning takes place• Parents can help their children do their homework on their own and on time
    • 11. Study Skills• Key opportunity for students to A resource for repeat information taught in teaching study skills school• Not always required by the school• Best to begin studying several nights before each test• Use good study skills• Parents can teach these skills to their children in early elementary school
    • 12. Organization• Disorganization can be part of the A resource teaching cause of poor grades organizational skills• Organization and planning ahead are learned skills• Parents play an important role in teaching their children organizational skills and keeping them motivated to practice the skills
    • 13. Class Participation• Critical for learning new skills• Key opportunity for students to repeat information being taught• Allows students to make deep, meaningful connections in the mind
    • 14. Class Participation Behaviors• Paying attention• Being on-task• Responding to questions• Participating in group discussions• Asking questions• Seeking help• Making good use of class time
    • 15. Problems with Classroom Participation• Signs: – Low grades – Incomplete work coming home as homework – Low grades on classroom papers – Does not know how to do homework – Teacher reports• Reasons – Personality style – Attention/learning problems – Low motivation – Bad experiences
    • 16. Teach your child what it means toparticipate in class• Discuss the different ways to Class Participation Behaviors • Paying attention participate in class • Being on-task• Show your child how to • Responding to questions participate • Participating in group discussions• Discuss the reasons why they • Asking questions do not participate • Seeking help • Making good use of class• Some children may need lots time of strong encouragement
    • 17. Monitor your child’s level of classparticipation• Let your child know that you will be talking with the teacher• Let your child know that you will be looking for improvement• Follow-up with the teacher at the end of the day and week• Connect any improvements in college work with increased participation
    • 18. Assessing the problem• How many? Possible Grade Elements • Tests• How many points each? • Quizzes• How did I do? • Homework • Class work • Papers • Special Projects • Final Exam • Extra Credit