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Understanding Creatively Gifted Students
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Understanding Creatively Gifted Students

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  • 1. Created By: Maria AveryFebruary 2012
  • 2.  This is an online module connected to the research study Understanding Creatively Gifted Students: Pre-Service Teachers’ Understandings and Professors’ Practices. This module will cover characteristics of creatively gifted students, identification of creatively gifted students, and how to support creatively gifted students. There will be a short scenario of a potential student. A brief quiz will be given at the end of this module in order for the participate to assess their own learning.
  • 3. Section 1:
  • 4.  Remember: Not all students are alike. These are just a few common characteristics of creatively gifted students. Notall of the following characteristics will be present in each child. Youmust observe each student with a new view and understanding because of this.
  • 5. Creatively gifted students . . . Think in different ways  An example of this is thinking in terms of fantasy and reality. Think about their work in more than one way  This means that they are able to critique their own work and defend it at the same time. Talented at solving problems with what is around them  If a student needs to fix a broken shelf they can find a way to do so with the limited about of supplies in the classroom.
  • 6. Gifted students . . . Are very aware of events going on around them Enjoy observing their surroundings Can be perceived as inattentive  They work better on their own schedule, when they can focus and not be distracted by their surroundings. Are risk takers  They like to push boundaries in order to create new things.
  • 7. Gifted students . . . Are not boastful about accomplishments Thrive on encouragement  If too many rewards are used with these types of students they will become disinterested in school. Aremotivated to learn through own accomplishments  The knowledge that they can improve in an area is what pushes them to learn more.
  • 8. Section 2:
  • 9.  Standardized test scores should not be the only criteria used to identify these students. Teachersmust be able to observe a student’s behavior, work ethic, outcomes of work, and preferences. Analyzing these elements will help a teacher recognize a creatively gifted student. Teachers need to interact with students to help in identifying creatively gifted students.
  • 10.  When observing a student, a teacher must complete more than one observation. Several factors can affect a student’s work on any given day.  Environmental Factors (classmates, location, etc.)  Student Health  Student Attitude  Assignments Teachers should be sure to refer to their counties policies on identifying students for more information.
  • 11. Section 3:
  • 12.  Justlike all student types, creatively gifted students should be offered appropriate support in the classroom. Creatively gifted students are not all alike. One student may demonstrate creativity in abstract problem solving, while another students excels at artistic tasks. Itis important to note the differences between the students so that they can receive the appropriate support.
  • 13.  The ways in which students are trained to solve problems, even in elementary classrooms, directly relate to how they will solve them in adulthood. Thereforestarting today, creatively gifted students must be prepared to be the creative problem solvers the world needs. American classrooms are not doing an effective job on this.
  • 14.  The “textbook” way of solving problems, which American classrooms focus on, does not leave room for discovering “new” ways to solve the problems, look at situations, or even find new problems. When creative assignments are assigned, they are typically just extra activities and often times they are not required.
  • 15.  Slight adjustments to regular teaching strategies, such as the ones listed below, can be used with creatively gifted students. Teachers can use flexible rubrics.  Rubric identifies the content to be covered  Depth of information expected  Other professional criteria (ex. neatness)  Means of presenting the information is up to the student! Teachers set the standards for classroom learning  Teachers set the goal of WHAT to learn, students can develop HOW to learn it
  • 16. Poor Average Above Average 1-2 points 2.5-3.5 points 4-5 points Spelling and Grammar There are more than 5 There are 3-5 spelling and There are less than 3 spelling spelling and grammar errors grammar errors present. and/or grammar errors present. present. Neatness The project appears to be There are some stray marks, There are no stray marks, unprofessional, handwriting handwriting has room for handwriting is neat, looks is poor, there are stray marks improvement, organization is professional, and is well visible, and the project lacks acceptable, and the project organized. organization. looks semi-professional. Accuracy There is inaccurate N/A The information presented is information presented. accurate.Appropriate Presentation The information is not N/A The information is presented Method presented in a Power Point. in a Power Point. Appropriate Topic The information does not There is some correlation The information strongly support the topic (The between the information and supports the topic (The History of Tryon Palace). the topic. History of Tryon Palace).
  • 17. Poor Average Above Average 1-2 points 2.5-3.5 points 4-5 points Spelling and Grammar There are more than 5 There are 3-5 spelling and There are less than 3 spelling spelling and grammar errors grammar errors present. and/or grammar errors present. present. Neatness The project appears to be There are some stray marks, When appropriate, there are unprofessional, handwriting handwriting has room for no stray marks, handwriting is poor, there are stray marks improvement, organization is is neat, looks professional, visible, and the project lacks acceptable, and the project and is well organized. organization. looks semi-professional. Accuracy There is inaccurate N/A The information presented is information presented. accurate.Appropriate Presentation The presentation method The presentation method The presentation method Method takes away from the offers some support to the used supports the information being given and information being given. information being given. causes confusion. There is room for improvement. Appropriate Topic The topic chosen by the There is some correlation The topic chosen by the student does not relate to between the topic chosen and student strongly relates to North Carolina History. North Carolina History. North Carolina History.
  • 18. Non-Flexible Rubric Flexible Rubric The specific topic was  The students were given given to the students. a general topic and (History of the Tryon then allowed to choose Palace) a more specific concept. (NC History) The method of presenting the  The students were information was given allowed to pick a to the students. (Power presentation method Point) they felt was appropriate for the information.
  • 19.  Theteacher determines what content needs to be covered in the classroom  Example- Cell Wall Permeability Theteacher develops a few ways to help students explore the content  Examples- An experiment with eggs, articles to read, options to complete their own research The student gets to pick the path they feel will be the most supportive of their learning  Students can share their findings with their classmates who completed different pathways.
  • 20. Student Scenario:
  • 21.  Emma is a student in a 7th grade classroom. Her teacher has noticed that Emma is always concerned about what is going on around her. Emma likes to watch her classmates and seems to have a hard time paying attention during parts of the day. Emma noticed that her schoolmates wasted large amounts of paper each day. She developed the idea that each classroom in the school could have a separate container for paper waste. With the help of the school art teacher, they collected the waste and created new art paper that students made flowers with. They then displayed the flowers around the school in order to beautify the school and raise awareness about recycling. Upon reflection, Emma decided she should have created a handout to give to the classrooms to explain more about the project. When Emma recognizes an area in which she needs improvement, she is intrinsically motivated to learn more. However, her test scores do not qualify her for AIG support.
  • 22.  Would you identify Emma as a creatively student? Why or why not? If you would identify her as a creatively gifted student, how would you help her succeed in English? Math? Social Studies? Science? Would you do anything to help address the fact that she seems inattentive in class? What would you do? Would you use these adjustments for all students in your class or just Emma?
  • 23. Please follow this link to take the quiz associated with this module.http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?PREVIE W_MODE=DO_NOT_USE_THIS_LINK_FOR_COL LECTION&sm=JZmO88uCjdqHDtEMccGmc9lf WgX%2f%2fCTE4PVE7hHL1lY%3d
  • 24. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York, New York: Harper Perennial.Davis, G. A. (2000). Creativity is forever (4th ed.). Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Publishers.Hennessey, B.A. (2004). Developing creativity in gifted children: the central importance of motivation and classroom climate. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (RM04202).Smutny, J. F., & von Fremd, S. E. (2009). Igniting creativity in gifted learners, k-6. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • 25.  Imageof “Emma” retrieved from http://realdealphotography.smugmug.com/M odels/Andrena-Hilstock/RDP5810- 01web/127435429_EeoSV-L.jpg
  • 26. As the researcher, I would just like to thankyou for taking part in this study. I hope youhave learned something through yourparticipation and that you will take this newfound knowledge with you into yourclassrooms. Good luck to you all! Best wishes, Maria Avery