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Let it go --how to meditate
 

Let it go --how to meditate

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Ajan Brahms Ideas on how to mediatate

Ajan Brahms Ideas on how to mediatate

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    Let it go --how to meditate Let it go --how to meditate Document Transcript

    • 1 Send a blank e mail to humantalents-subscribe@yahoogroups.com and obtain FREE membership Let it go- An explanation from Rev Ajan Brahm on Meditation Presented by Jayadeva de Silva I don’t know which sutta it comes from, and it doesn’t matter even if it doesn’t, but Ajahn Brahm told a story of how Buddha was wandering along with Ananda when they came across a monk sitting under a tree in meditation. The monk was sat on the ground with a straight back, his hands were folded, and his head and neck at just the right angle. He was
    • 2 Send a blank e mail to humantalents-subscribe@yahoogroups.com and obtain FREE membership deep in meditation and had been for some time. The Buddha turned to Ananda and said “I’m worried about that monk.” A few minutes later they came across another monk sitting under a tree in meditation. He was on a comfy cushion, his back was bent forward and he’d fallen asleep. Every now and then he’d wake up only to nod off again. He was even snoring. The Buddha turned to Ananda and said “this monk I’m not worried about at all, he’s doing just fine.” The point, of course, is about letting go. With his perfect posture and iron will, the first monk had turned meditation into a competitive sport, even if the only person he was competing against was himself. He wasn’t abandoning the ego, he was building it. Ajahn Brahm talked about a friend of his in Wat Nong Pah Pong years ago who was admired for his diligence and discipline, sitting upright while others would be half asleep with heads almost on the floor. Eventually the friend disrobed, the whole experience of monkhood had been, he discovered, an exercise in ego, nothing but a constant struggle.
    • 3 Send a blank e mail to humantalents-subscribe@yahoogroups.com and obtain FREE membership The second monk, the one the Buddha wasn’t worried about, had the sense to relax. If he nodded off, then he nodded off, no big deal. He was able to let go, let go of his need for perfection, and let go of the struggle. Even more, he was able to trust that things would be just fine without his striving and without his perfection. ” Ajahn Brahm talks about trying to control your mind and thoughts, trying to control anything in fact, as being like a farmer holding onto a rope trying to control a buffalo as it runs away. The rope can get twisted round your fingers and what will happen next? The farmer will lose his fingers. Crazy farmer, all he gets is pain and suffering, and in any case buffalos never go far. If the farmer had just waited a few minutes he could have just walked up to the buffalo and led it wherever he wanted to go. “If you know how to let go and be at peace, you know everything you need to know about living in the world.”