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Delhi's CommonDeath Games!

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  • Very nice and smart presention. Thanks for sharing..
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  • Men's inhumanity to men is repeated throughout the history in many different forms. Why, may I ask why, men don't ever learn? Is it god's will? Is it law of the jungle? Is it imbalance in supply and demand? Have human lives become disposable? Or is human nature intrinsically evil? I hope not!!! Then why oh why, are these tragedies repeated incessantly? Is the answer also in the wind? I have only questions!!!

    Thank you for presenting this ugly issue so eloquently, so artistically, so skillfully, so.........
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  • It's good that you've taken up this issue. Here are some images of anti-CWG graffiti in Delhi: http://www.flickr.com/photos/48202244@N06/sets/72157623474017135/ You might want to make a slideshow out of it or include it here.
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  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Commonwealth_Games#Labour_violations

    'Campaigners in India have accused the organisers of enormous and systematic violations of labour laws at construction sites. Human Rights Law Network reports that independent investigations have discovered more than 70 cases where workers have died in accidents at construction sites since work began.[40] Although official numbers have not been released, it is estimated that over 415,000 contract daily wage workers are working on Games projects.[41] Unskilled workers are paid 85 to 100 Indian rupees (INR) per day while skilled workers are paid 120 to 130 INR per day for eight hours of work. Workers also state that they are paid 134 to 150 INR for 12 hours of work (eight hours plus four hours of overtime). Both these wages contravene the stipulated Delhi state minimum wage of INR 152 (approx. US$3) for eight hours of work.[citation needed]

    These represent violations of the Minimum Wages Act, 1948; Interstate Migrant Workmen (Regulation of Employment and Condition of Services) Act 1979, and the constitutionally enshrined fundamental rights per the 1982 Supreme Court of India judgement on Asiad workers.[42]

    There have been documented instances of the presence of young children at hazardous construction sites, due to a lack of child care facilities for women workers living and working in the labour camp style work sites.[43] Furthermore, workers on the site of the main Commonwealth stadium have reportedly been issued with hard hats, yet most work in open-toed sandals and live in cramped tin tenements in which illnesses are rife.[44] The High Court of Delhi is presently hearing a public interest petition relating to employers not paying employees for overtime and it has appointed a four-member committee to submit a report on the alleged violations of workers rights.[43][45]

    During the construction of the Games Village, there was controversy over financial mismanagement,[46] profiteering by the Delhi Development Authority and private Real Estate Companies,[47] and inhumane working conditions.[48]'
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  • A smart presentation it is!!!!!!!!! You are realy good Truce Steinenbein!
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Delhi's CommonDeath Games!

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