The Design Age
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The Design Age

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Design is all about value. It helps transfer value from one person to another. Design insures you have an experience: that at the end, you’re different than when you started. Design makes this......

Design is all about value. It helps transfer value from one person to another. Design insures you have an experience: that at the end, you’re different than when you started. Design makes this difference, and like Babbage’s Difference Engine of yore, specific knobs and levers control how much value you can create with design.

In this presentation, we’ll learn how five levers — models, fidelity, audience, annotation, and velocity — work together. We’ll see how agile, lean, and waterfall teams apply these levers differently at different times to create different value from design.

Friday at work, you won’t be able to stop yourself from asking five, simple questions. You’ll be maximizing design value for every project you encounter.

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  • 1. THE DESIGN AGE a young designer’s primer for maximizing value in agile and lean teamsFrom “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 2. Introduction Design is all about value. It helps transfer value from one person to another. Design insures you have an experience: that at the end, you’re different than when you started. Design makes this difference, and like Babbage’s Difference Engine of yore, specific knobs and levers control how much value you can create with design. In this presentation, we’ll learn how five levers — models, fidelity, audience, annotation, and velocity — work together. We’ll see how agile, lean, and waterfall teams apply these levers differently at different times to create different value from design. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 3. INTRODUCTION From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 4. Introduction The Goal Change how you practice design From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 5. Introduction The Goal Change how you think about design From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 6. Introduction The Goal Change how you understand design From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 7. Introduction Three Discussions From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 8. Introduction 1. Why? Why are agile, lean, and waterfall the same thing? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 9. Introduction 1. Why? Why are agile, lean, and waterfall the same thing? This is called the process. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 10. Introduction 2. What? What are design’s four concerns? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 11. Introduction 2. What? What are design’s four concerns? This is called the discipline. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 12. Introduction 3. How? How do we conduct design? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 13. Introduction 3. How? How do we conduct design? This is called the practice. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 14. Introduction Three Discussions 1. The process 2. The discipline 3. The practice From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 15. Introduction The Walk Away Five questions that guide how you practice design From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 16. Mind Game What’s the coolest, most awesome thing about where you work? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 17. Mind Game Hi, I’m Austin Govella, an Experience Design Manager at Avanade where we’re re-inventing how enterprises collaborate. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 18. Mind Game Hi, I’m Austin name your Govella, an Experience Design Manager your title at company where we’re Avanade r e-inventing howawesome the coolest, most enterprises thing about where you work abut about about elaborate. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 19. A MANIFESTO FORUSER EXPERIENCE From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 20. Manifesto Designers don’t design anything. Organizations design everything. Just as your best thinker improves everything, that one person in your group who doesn’t understand user experience creates a drag on every product or service you produce. To create better experiences, you have to create better organizations. You have to improve your organ- ization’s design literacy. You have to improve the design literacy of everyone in the group. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 21. Manifesto Organizations face common barriers to designing better experiences. These barriers — value, focus, time, memory, talent, process, and improvement — represent the distance between you and the balanced teams your organization needs to create better experiences. Sometimes these cultural barriers are codified into your organization’s process. Sometimes they exist as hidden assumptions in your team members minds. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 22. Manifesto Don’t change what you do. Change how you do it. Your design activities don’t change. Change how you work with your team. Change how you work, so your goal is always a better organization instead of a better product. Change how you accomplish the design, so that you are always improving your team’s design literacy. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 23. Manifesto The InspirationDon’t look for the nextopportunity.The one you have in hand isthe opportunity.— Paul Arden From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 24. HOUSEKEEPING From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 25. Housekeeping The Presentation A diverse range of material from over a decade that is still evolving From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 26. Housekeeping Questions If something isn’t clear, raise your hand and ask. Questions and discussion at the end won’t be as useful. Grab a drink with me afterward! From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 27. Housekeeping Get The Slides Available on SlideShare: http://slideshare.net/austingovella/design-age From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 28. Housekeeping Contact Me ag@agux.co @austingovella www.thinkingandmaking.com From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 29. Mind Game The Customer is always right. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 30. Mind Game Whenever you hear something you don’t agree with, tell yourself: “The customer is always right. I just don’t understand.” Then, ask a question to help you understand. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 31. AGILE building certaintyFrom “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 32. Agile Manifesto for Agile Software Development Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan Manifesto for Agile Software Development, http://agilemanifesto.org. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 33. Agile Manifesto for Agile Software Development Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan Manifesto for Agile Software Development, http://agilemanifesto.org. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 34. Agile Manifesto for Agile Software Development Individuals and interactions over models of people doing work Working software over models of software Customer collaboration over models of collaboration Responding to change over models of change Manifesto for Agile Software Development, http://agilemanifesto.org. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 35. Agile Manifesto for Agile Software Development Real people doing work over models of people doing work Real software over models of software Real collaboration over models of collaboration Real change over models of change Manifesto for Agile Software Development, http://agilemanifesto.org. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 36. Agile But What Is Real? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 37. Why?From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 38. Agile Agile Context Known Unknown Problem f Solution f Resources f From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 39. Agile “Divination also becomes progressively more difficult with time, as circles of probability in imaginary time enlarge.” Peter Carroll, Psybermagick: Advanced Ideas in Chaos Magick, New Falcon Publications, 2000. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 40. Agile The Futures Are Messy Certainty Uncertainty/Waste From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 41. Agile Agile Builds Certainty ‣ Agile focuses on certainty around what will be built. ‣ Agile seeks to minimize unnecessary change. ‣ Agile values the build over everything else. The build represents certainty. ‣ Agile captures value by reducing waste. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 42. Agile Agile ProcessREVIEW 1. Review the present. PLAN 2. Plan the future. 3. Build the plan. BUILD From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 43. Agile Agile Outcomes Rely on the plan toREVIEW create build. Pursue velocity through the PLAN review, plan, build loop. Quick reviews (velocity) through the loop reduces BUILD risk you build the wrong thing. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 44. LEAN learning certaintyFrom “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 45. Lean “[Lean UX is] the practice of bringing the true nature of our work to light faster, with less emphasis on deliverables and greater focus on the actual experience being designed.” Jeff Gothelf, Lean UX, presentation, Jan 2011. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 46. Lean “[Lean UX is] the practice of bringing the true nature of our work to light faster, with less emphasis on deliverables and greater focus on the actual experience being designed.” Jeff Gothelf, Lean UX, presentation, Jan 2011. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 47. Why?From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 48. Lean Lean Context Known Unknown Problem f Solution f Resources f From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 49. Lean The Futures Are Expensive Design loses money Design makes money Out of cash From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 50. Lean Lean Learns Certainty ‣ Lean focuses on learning what is most valuable. ‣ Lean seeks to maximize necessary change. ‣ Lean values learning over everything else. Learning represents certainty. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 51. Lean Lean Process BUILD 1. Build the solution. MEASURE 2. Measure the value. 3. Learn a new solution. LEARN From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 52. Lean Lean Outcomes Pursue velocity through the BUILD build, measure, learn loop. Rely on what was measured MEASURE in order to learn. Velocity through the loop increases risk you build the LEARN right thing. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 53. DESIGN measuring certaintyFrom “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 54. Design Design is a modeling discipline. The design process creates models we use to validate predictions about a system. Design validates what we expect against what we perceive. We architect systems that engender expectations and perceptions. Experience is the gap between expectation and perception. We design this gap. We design experience. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 55. Why?From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 56. Design Design Context Known Unknown Problem ? ? Solution ? ? Resources ? ? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 57. Design The Futures Are Possible Unknown problems/solutions Known problems solutions Discover Model Validate From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 58. Design Design Measures Certainty ‣ Design focuses on discover uncertainty. ‣ Design models change. ‣ Design values measuring over everything else. Measuring represents certainty. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 59. Design Design ProcessDISCOVER 1. Discover the problem and/or the solution. MODEL 2. Model the solution. 3. Validate your model. VALIDATE From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 60. Design Design Outcomes Pursues velocity throughDISCOVER the discover, model, validate loop. MODEL Measure what was made against expectations. Velocity increases the risk VALIDATE you measure the right thing. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 61. THE PROCESS designing certainty From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 62. The Process The Same Process AGILE LEAN DESIGN Plan Learn Discover Build Build Model Review Measure Validate From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 63. The Process Agile Process PLAN REVIEW BUILD From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 64. The Process Lean Process LEARN Plan Review MEASURE Build BUILD From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 65. The Process Design Process DISCOVER Plan Learn Measure Review VALIDATE Build MODEL From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 66. The Process But what do we discover? Model? Validate? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 67. The Process The Unified Process DISCOVER Plan DATA Learn MODELS Measure Review VALIDATE Build ARTIFACTS MODEL From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 68. The Process Agile is obsessed with the question: Is this what you wanted? Lean is obsessed with the question: Is this the most valuable thing? Design is obsessed with the question: Is this what we thought it was? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 69. The Process Data How do we create Models Artifacts } Deliverables Discover How do we Model Validate } Activities From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 70. THE MODELS From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 71. The Models Design is a modeling discipline. The design process creates models we use to validate predictions about a system. Design validates what we expect against what we perceive. We architect systems that engender expectations and perceptions. Experience is the gap between expectation and perception. We design this gap. We design experience. From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 72. Mind GameWhat does design model? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 73. Mind Game If design models, what four things does design model? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 74. The Models o Users From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 75. The Models p Interfaces From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 76. The Models Interactions o p From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 77. The Models Systems o p o p o po p From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 78. The Models We validate our models by showing them to people. Who do we validate our models with? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 79. The Models Audience AUDIENCE Yourself Your team Organization Your users From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 80. The Models How realistic must our models be in order to be validated? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 81. The Models Fidelity VISUAL None Low Medium High BEHAVIOR None Low Medium High CONTENT None Low Medium High CONTEXT None Low Medium High From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 82. The Models What does our audience need to know in order to validate the models? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 83. The Models Annotation IMPLICIT - What can the audience intuit? (Affordances) None Low Medium High EXPLICIT - What do we need to tell them? (Instructions) None Low Medium High TACIT - What do they already know? (Culture) None Low Medium High From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 84. The Models How will we communicate the models? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 85. The Models Communication TIME - When are you communicating with the audience? Synchronous Asynchronous PLACE - Where is the audience? Co-located Remote USE - How will it be communicated? Private Shared From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 86. THE FIVEQUESTIONS From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013
  • 87. The Models The Five Questions 1. What model are we validating? 2. Who is the audience? 3. What fidelity do we need? 4. What annotation do we need? 5. How is it communicated? From “The Design Age: maximizing value in agile and lean teams” by Austin Govella, Feb 7, 2013