Jacob Boutique Inc.

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  • 1. 



 


 



 FINAL
PAPER
 Customer
Service
Excellence
(Mark
480)
 Handed
in
by:

 
 Gabrielle
Abergel
9070389
 Aurore
Pak
9443959
 Christine
Joyal
5729351
 Angela
Marchetta
4952464

 Nadia
Forghani
5199182
 
 April
9,
2009

 Professor
Hakkyun
Kim


  • 2. Executive
Summary
 JACOB
Boutique
Inc.
(here
forth
referred
to
as
JACOB)
is
one
of
the
most
popular
women’s’
clothing
retailer
in
Canada
and
is
known
as
a
company
that
puts
customer
service
at
a
premium
level.

Hence,
the
purpose
of
this
report
was
to
analyze
JACOBs
current
customer
service
strategy
and
provide
solutions
and
recommendations
in
order
to
improve
it,
thus
increasing
the
firm’s
overall
profitability.



 

 To
understand
and
analyze
Jacobs
strategy,
we
first
conducted
primary
research
by
going
on‐site
to
different
JACOB
stores
and
anonymously
evaluating
JACOB’s
customer
service
for
ourselves
(by
acting
as
mystery
shoppers).

We
also
conducted
interviews
with
two
of
the
company’s
managers.

Furthermore,
secondary
research
was
conducted
by
locating
JACOB’s
current
documentation
in
terms
of
customer
service
standards
and
programs,
as
well
as
employee
hiring,
training,
and
compensation
programs
aimed
at
excelling
in
terms
of
customer
service.


 The
analysis
of
our
results
indicate
that
while
customer
service
at
JACOB’s
is
claimed
as
being
a
primary
concern
for
the
company,
the
actual
customer
service
offered
at
diverse
stores
was
globally
disappointing.

Indeed,
the
customer
service
standards
were
not
met
and
we
realized
that
important
recommendations
need
to
be
implemented
in
order
to
rectify
the
customer
service
problems
being
currently
experienced.

After
careful
consideration,
the
following
recommendations
were
identified
and
will
be
explained
in
further
detail
throughout
the
following
report:

 1. In
the
short
term:
 1) send
regular
emails
to
the
customers
(WHY
NUMBERS?)
 − collect
and
improve
service
through
customer
complaints
 2) redesign
the
waiting
line
system
 3) speak
to
the
customer
by
using
their
names
 − offering
clients
the
visit
of
a
fashion
stylist
every
month
 − improve
the
physical
service
environment
 − set
up
fitting
room
lights

 2. In
the
medium
term:
 − organize
VIP
cocktail
nights
to
view
the
new
collections
in
advance
 − establish
a
loyalty
program
 − provide
a
more
extensive
employee
training

 3. In
the
long
term:
 − restructure
the
waiting
room


 As
a
result,
we
strongly
believe
that
these
recommendations
will
be
impactful
enough
that
they
will
improve
Jacob
customers’
perceived
performance
of
the
retail
chain,
as
well
as
the
profitability
of
the
company.
 Table
of
Contents
 2
  • 3. Industry
Analysis
and
JACOB’s
Background
Information………..…………………………
Page
4

JACOB’s
Current
Employee
System
of
Customer
Service……………………………………
Page
8
JACOB’s
Analysis…………….………………………………………………………………………………
Page
13

JACOB’s
Analysis
as
Related
to
Course
Concepts.………………………………………………
Page
16

List
of
Recommendations/Notes
on
Past
Recommendations…..…………………………
Page
20
Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………..…………………………
Page
29

Appendix
A‐Manager
Questionnaire
and
Answers……………………………………………
Page
30

Appendix
B‐Example
of
the
Onsite‐Questionnaire……………………………………………
Page
33

Appendix
C‐
Results
of
the
Onsite‐Questionnaires
……………………………………………Page
37

Appendix
D‐
JACOB’s
Six
Core
Competencies
Table..………………………………….………
Page
40

Appendix
E‐
JACOB’s
Four
Organizational
Values…..………………………………….………
Page
41
Appendix
F‐
Examples
of
STAR
Program
Nomination
Forms..…………………….………
Page
42




















Industry
Analysis
and
JACOB
Background
Information
 3
  • 4. 
 The
Canadian
retail
market
has
evolved
rapidly
over
the
last
few
decades,
being
more
and
more
competitive
mainly
due
to
the
rise
of
foreign
retailers.

A
Statistics
Canada
survey
showed
that
 within
 20
 years’,
 between
 1975
 and
 1995,
 the
 number
 of
 foreign
 retailers
 has
 more
 than
tripled
and
their
floor
area
has
more
than
doubled.




 Regarding
 the
 clothing
 industry,
 Canadian
 households
 average
 spending
 in
 clothing
increased
 by
 2.7%
 between
 2006
 and
 2007
 to
 just
 over
 $2,900
 per
 year.
 
 However
 today,
 the
Canadian
 clothes
 retailing
 has
 to
 face
 the
 economic
 and
 financial
 crisis
 that
 has
 an
 impact
 on
peoples
consuming
behaviors
and
attitudes.






 Boutique
 Jacob
 is
 one
 of
 the
 most
 popular
 Canadian
 women’s
 wear
 brands.
 
 Created
 in
1977,
the
company
now
has
about
200
stores
all
over
Canada
and
the
United
States
of
America.

The
 Montreal‐based
 clothing
 store
 chain
 has
 under
 its
 name
 five
 branches:
 Jacob,
 Jacob
Connexion,
Jacob
Lingerie,
Josef
and
their
brand
new
line
DANZ,
with
which
they
target
different
customers.


 


 
 2)
Jacob
and
its
Target
Segments


 In
 order
to
 target
the
whole
 women’s
segment
and
to
 increase
customers
loyalty
 to
 the
brand,
 Jacob
 offers
 a
 large
 range
 of
 products
 with
 its
 five
 branches
 to
 ensure
 that
 it
 attracts
women
of
every
style
–trendy,
classic
or
athletic‐
and
age
‐teens
to
senior‐.

The
idea
is
to
satisfy
women
and
their
wants
as
well
as
their
expectations
at
any
time
or
situation
of
their
lives,
even
if
their
wants
change
over
time.

In
other
words,
Jacob
tries
to
accompany
women
throughout
the
progress
of
their
lives.


 The
 Jacob
 branch
 targets
 working
 women
 in
 their
 mid‐twenties
 to
 mid‐forties,
 providing
them
a
formal
but
fashionable
range
of
clothes,
accessories
and
jewelry.

Usually,
Jacob
Lingerie
division
 is
 located
 near
 a
 Jacob
 store.
 
 Women
 aged
 25‐44
 represents
 24.6%
 of
 the
 female
population
in
Canada
(Source:
Statistics
Canada
2008),
which
is
a
substantial
segment.

Womens
status
has
changed
and
there
is
obviously
an
empowerment
of
women
in
society.

Career
is
part
of
 4
  • 5. todays
womens
lives.

The
fifth
edition
of
the
compendium
Women
in
Canada:
A
Gender‐based
Statistical
 Report
 highlights
 the
 financial
 autonomy
 of
 women
 noticing
 that
 ‘‘in
 2004,
 58%
 of
 all
women
aged
15
and
over
were
part
of
the
paid
work
force,
up
from
42%
in
1976.
In
contrast,
the
proportion
 of
 men
 who
 were
 employed
 fell
 during
 this
 period
 from
 73%
 to
 68%’’.
 
 At
 the
 same
time,
 women
 of
 that
 age
 are
 more
 sensitive
 to
 feminine
 messages,
 they
 feel
 more
 concerned
about
issues
that
touches
womens
roles,
their
condition,
status
and
image
at
work
(eg.
sex‐based
discrimination,
 women
 at
 top
 positions)
 and
 in
 society,
 but
 also
 to
 environmental
 issues.

Furthermore,
we
notice
a
trend
of
‘‘real
women’’
in
advertising,
featuring
women
that
we
could
meet
in
everyday
life
and
who
face
the
same
situation
as
the
consumer
could
face
in
her
own
life
(eg:
Dove).





 Targeting
a
financially
independent
and
quite
feminist
consumer,
Jacob
offers
considerably
professional
 and
 trendy
 clothing
 priced
 from
 $20
 to
 $200
 in
 stores
 that
 are
 presented
 with
 an
elegant
and
modern
design,
black
and
white
being
the
principle
colors
of
the
interior,
reminding
us
of
Jacobs
corporate
colors.




 Whereas
 Jacob
 Connexion
 offers
 a
 more
 casual
 and
 classic
 style
 inspired
 from
 European
designs
to
teens
and
young
adults,
Jacob
Connexion
stores,
focusing
on
a
younger
and
more
casual
target,
are
more
functional
and
colors
inside
are
lighter.


The
under‐25
year
old
segment
is
more
difficult
to
target.

Indeed,
this
segment
is
quite
versatile
and
knowing
the
needs
and
wants
and
meet
the
expectations
of
each
person
becomes
harder
when
there
are
no
global
trends
that
can
help
 defining
 them.
 (I
 would
 delete
 this!)
 
 However,
 Jacob
 targets
 a
 customer
 who
 looks
 for
comfort
 and
 classical
 style,
 as
 well
 as
 older
 women
 who
 could
 wear
 these
 clothes
 on
 the
 week
end.

Since
the
target
customer
is
quite
young
and
the
clothes’
designs
and
material
are
basic
and
simple,
prices
are
set
accordingly,
going
from
$15
to
$125.
The
squirrel
is
the
footprint
of
Jacob
Connexion
(Delete!).


 

 Jacob
Lingerie
represents
a
small
portion
of
Boutique
Jacobs
floor
area
however
it
renews
the
 colors
 and
 styles
 of
 its
 products
 at
 each
 season.
 
 The
 target
 here
 is
 much
 larger
 and
 the
products
are
directed
towards
young
women
in
general
for
reasonable
priced
lingerie
items.


 5
  • 6. 



 



And
 finally
 Josef,
 which
 is
 the
 latest
 born
 branch
 of
 Jacob,
 focuses
 on
 women
 aged
 35

and
over.

To
have
an
idea
of
what
the
weight
that
mature
age
women
represent,
we
observe
that
35‐44
 year
 olds
 represent
 14%
 of
 Canadian
 women,
 45‐55
 represent
 15,8%.
 
 By
 now,
 Josefs
market
is
not
as
significant
as
Jacobs
brands,
but
knowing
that
there
is
an
aging
population,
we
could
expect
success
of
Josef
if
Jacob
manages
to
retain
its
loyal
customers
who
will
shift
to
Josef
(Delete!).

 

 
 3)
The
competitors

 

 Being
 positioned
 as
 a
 globally
 mid‐priced
 brand
 for
 casual/formal
 womens
 clothing,
Jacobs
main
competitors
in
Canada
would
be
Mexx,
RW&CO.,
Zara,
Tristan,
and
Banana
Republic.




 Firstly
we
notice
that
in
addition
to
displaying
women’s
collections,
all
these
brands
have

mens
collections,
contrary
to
Jacob,
which
only
focuses
on
women.

Besides,
Mexx
and
Zara
even
have
 looks
 for
 children
 and
 babies.
 
 Like
 Jacob,
 these
 competitors
 target
 young
 to
 mature
 age
women,
who
are
looking
for
casual
and/or
professional
clothes
at
a
reasonable
price.

However,
Jacob
 differentiates
 itself
 having
 a
 lingerie
 department
 whereas
 its
 competitors
 do
 not,
 not
mentioning
the
ambiance
perfume
that
is
spread
all
over
the
store
(Delete!).

For
the
purpose
of
our
study,
we
will
only
focus
on
the
womens
collections
of
these
stores.


 Comparing
the
styles,
Mexx
and
RW&CO.
are
more
casual
than
other
brands.

Like
Jacob,
RW&CO
is
a
Canadian
brand.
It
targets
18‐30
year
old
customers
who
look
for
comfortable
clothes
adapted
 to
 the
 urban
 way
 of
 life.
 
 The
 RW&CO
 stores
 also
 reflect
 this
 idea
 of
 comfort
 and
 ease
with
a
mix
of
dark
wood
and
white
colors
(delete!).




 Created
 in
 the
 1980s,
 Mexx
 is
 a
 brand
 that
 comes
 from
 the
 Netherlands
 and
 has
 been
bought
by
an
American
fashion
company
in
2001.

Mexx
puts
a
particular
attention
on
creating
an
atmosphere
 in
 its
 stores
 having
 three
 different
 kinds
 of
 stores:
 Mexx
 Mega‐store
 selling
 Mexx
Men,
Mexx
Women,
Mexx
Youth,
MexxSport,
XX
by
Mexx
and
some
Mexx
non‐apparel
products
 6
  • 7. and
accessories
in
a
light
and
uncluttered
interior
design;
Mexx
Family
store
for
women,
men
and
youth,
providing
a
feeling
being
at
home;
and
Mexx
Lifestyle
store
for
men‐
and
women’s
‐wear
giving
the
impression
of
a
spacious
and
functional
place
(Delete!).




 Zara,
 Tristan
 and
 Banana
 Republic
 have
 an
 image
 that
 is
 rather
 classy
 and
 professional.

Zara
 opened
 in
 1975
 and
 is
 well‐established
 in
 Europe
 for
 a
 long
 time
 now.
 
 The
 Spanish
 firm
developed
 several
 looks
 for
 teenage
 girls
 (TRF),
 young
 woman,
 professionals
 (ZARA
 Woman),
offering
casual
and
comfortable
outfits
as
well
as
formal
and
smart
clothes.

The
Service
Quality
dimension
 they
 emphasize
 more
 is
 probably
 the
 tangibles
 since
 employees
 have
 a
 uniform,
women
 wearing
 black
 suit
 and
 pants
 with
 the
 companys
 t‐shirt
 and
 men
 wear
 grey
 shirt
 with
black
tie
and
pants
(Delete!).

The
interior
is
modern
with
bright
colors
such
as
white
and
silver,
but
there
is
no
real
personal
service
contrary
to
the
other
competitors.




 Tristan
 focuses
 on
 a
 slightly
 older
 customer,
 35‐45
 year
 old
 women.
 
 Generally
 split
 into
two
 parts
 (Men
 and
 Women),
 Tristan
 stores
 are
 very
 simply
 designed
 and
 as
 many
 of
 its
competitors,
it
uses
white
(and
grey)
as
the
main
color
indoors
(delete!).






 Meanwhile,
Banana
Republic
targets
a
larger
audience.

Well‐known
in
America
since
1978,
the
brand
has
been
bought
by
the
Gap
in
1983
but
entered
Canada
only
in
1995.

Banana
Republic
may
be
positioned
slightly
above
the
other
brands
delivering
more
sophisticated
styles
but
also
at
a
higher
price
than
the
brands
mentioned
previously.

The
stores
are
designed
in
an
elegant
style,
with
soft
colors,
usually
 off‐white
or
pastel
colors.

But
usually,
they
also
seem
larger,
with
high
ceilings
and
wider
and
deeper
stores
(delete!).






 7
  • 8. JACOB’s
Current
Employee
System
of
Customer
Service

 JACOB’s
 primary
 objective
 is
 to
 satisfy
 customers
 and
 to
 provide
 them
 with
 a
 unique
shopping
 experience.
 By
 doing
 this,
 it
 is
 of
 utmost
 important
 to
 hire,
 guide,
 and
 motivate
 their
employees.
 JACOB
 currently
 has
 two
 methods
 of
 hiring
 the
 correct
 employees
 who
 fit
 with
 the
company’s
mission,
vision
and
norms.
They
also
have
three
other
remuneration
plans
to
help
and
encourage
the
employee
to
provide
an
excellent
customer
service
throughout
the
sale
process.


 The
first
step
is
to
hire
the
right
people
within
the
already
existing
team.
This
role
is
to
be
played
by
the
management
team
of
the
JACOB
Boutique.
Anyone
can
apply
either
in‐person
at
a
store
or
go
online
to
apply
for
a
full‐time,
part‐time,
temporary
or
seasonal
position.
The
resumes
are
 then
 pre‐screened
 by
 management.
 If
 the
 manager
 evaluates
 that
 the
 candidate
 has
 prior
sales
experience
or
holds
the
four
values
that
are
important
to
JACOB
(Passion,
Respect,
Integrity,
Team
Spirit),
that
particular
candidate
is
then
called
in
for
a
one‐on‐one
interview
with
the
store
manager
or
assistant
manager.
The
interview
can
take
between
30
minutes
and
1
hour;
depending
on
the
number
of
Service
Competencies
questions
the
store
manager
wishes
to
ask
the
candidate
(Delete!).
The
candidate
needs
to
prove
to
the
store
manager
that
s/he
can
provide
an
excellent
customer
 service,
 by
 providing
 prior
 examples
 or
 situations
 and
 that
 s/he
 also
 fits
 within
 the
current
 store
 and
 employee
 environment.
 S/he
 can
 demonstrate
 this
 by
 answering
 some
 basic
behavioural
questions.



 Once
the
candidate
is
hired,
s/he
is
automatically
placed
on
three
months
probation
and
needs
to
accomplish
six
steps
of
the
JACOB
team
profile
of
competencies.
The
six
team
profiles
of
competencies
are
listed
below
with
a
brief
key
description.

 1. Sales
and
Customer
Service
Excellence:
efficiently
discover
the
needs
of
the
client,
build
a
 profitable
and
productive
relationship
with
the
client,
ensure
the
client
is
satisfied
with
the
 service
and
promote
and
encourage
customer
loyalty.

 o Key
Actions:
Greet
the
customer,
define
her
purpose
and
need
of
shopping,
suggest
 and
 present
 complimentary
 accessories
 and/or
 products,
 create
 a
 positive
 atmosphere,
conclude
the
sale
and
ask
for
client’s
feedback.
 8
  • 9. 

2. Impact
of
Communication:
Communicate
in
a
respectful,
amicable
way
to
individuals
who
 are
part
of
the
sales
team
and
 most
importantly,
 to
the
client.
 Be
confident,
 patient
 and
 communicate
 through
 different
 communication
 tools
 (verbal
 and
 non‐verbal)
 to
 help
 the
 sales
 team
 or
 client
 to
 understand
 you
 more
 clearly.
 This
 should
 be
 in
 effect
 to
 help
 provide
 a
 favourable
 perception
 to
 the
 client
 and
 sales
 teams
 of
 the
 organizational
 importance
of
customer
service.

 o Key
Actions:
Make
sure
information
is
well
structured,
make
sure
the
audience
has
 your
 attention,
 adapt
 yourself
 to
 the
 audience,
 make
 sure
 the
 other
 individual
 comprehends
 your
 message,
 communicate
 within
 the
 rhythm
 and
 syntax
 of
 the
 audience,
 understand
 the
 message
 being
 related
 to
 you,
 express
 yourself
 with
 confidence,
and
reflect
the
organizations
image.
 
3. Energy:
 Maintain
 the
 level
 of
 energy
 within
 the
 certain
 time
 frame
 within
 the
 store.
 Maintain
a
positive
and
friendly
energy
when
time
can
be
long
or
boring.
If
needed,
delay
 your
departure
time
(take
initiative
to
stay
longer
when
busy.)
 o Key
Actions:
demonstrate
endurance
when
the
store
is
busy
as
well
as
when
it
is
not,
 uphold
a
certain
level
of
efficiency
within
the
store.
 
4. Team
Work:
Participate
as
much
as
an
individual
and
as
a
team
member
to
accomplish
the
 daily
 store
 objectives.
 This
 can
 contribute
 to
 sales,
 mental
 or
 physical
 tasks
 during
 any
 given
day.
 o Key
Actions:
Achieve
daily
store
sales
objectives,
get
other
teams
members
involved
 with
 certain
 daily
 tasks,
 share
 any
 related
 information
 with
 other
 team
 members,
 provide
and
become
the
example.

 
5. Quality
 and
 Detail‐Oriented:
 Be
 diligent
 of
 your
 surroundings
 when
 performing
 certain
 daily
tasks.

 o Key
 Actions:
 Respect
 the
 store
 procedures,
 ensure
 the
 task
 is
 done
 with
 care
 and
 with
high
quality,
take
action
within
one
self.
 9
  • 10. 
 6. Adaptability:
 Be
 positive,
 professional
 and
 efficient
 within
 any
 major
 or
 minor
 changes
 which
take
place.
Adapt
yourself
to
any
new
or
improved
culture,
structure
or
procedures.


 o Key
Actions:
Fully
understand
and
comprehend
the
new
reason
behind
the
change,
 approach
the
change
with
a
positive
and
confident
attitude,
adapt
your
behaviour
 to
the
change.

Provide
a
consistent
quality
of
customer
service
to
manage
dealing
 with
customer
introduced
variability.

 The
 employee
 does
 not
 only
 need
 to
 demonstrate
 the
 six
 steps
 of
 team
 profiles
 of
competencies,
 s/he
 also
 needs
 to
 be
 comfortable
 in
 making
 a
 transaction
 on
 the
 cash
 register,
perform
 an
 efficient
 return
 transaction,
 be
 comfortable
 in
 explaining
 the
 return
 policies
 and
 14‐day
price
adjustment
policies.
The
sale
representatives
also
need
to
be
able
to
explain
the
fit
of
JACOB
 clothing,
 how
 certain
 cuts
 are
 worn
 or
 where
 they
 should
 be
 worn.
 Be
 comfortable
 in
providing
 a
 certain
 knowledge
 and
 understanding
 of
 the
 clothing
 in
 other
 departments
 (JACOB
lingerie,
 JACOB
 Connexion).
 If
 the
 employee
 demonstrates
 within
 the
 3
 months
 that
 s/he
 is
capable
 of
 not
 only
 providing
 an
 excellent
 customer
 service
 and
 demonstrate
 all
 the
 above
criteria,
then
s/he
is
entitled
to
an
hourly
salary
increase
of
$0.25
after
three
months,
followed
by
another
one
of
$0.25
after
having
completed
450
working
hours.


 The
 current
 employees
 are
 always
 encouraged
 to
 provide
 feedback
 to
 their
 store
management
team.
This
can
not
only
benefit
them
in
providing
a
positive
learning
experience
but
also
benefit
the
management
team
in
having
a
clear
vision
of
what
is
actually
going
on
the
sales
floor.
 
 JACOB
 has
 currently
 two
 ways
 of
 providing
 feedback
 to
 their
 colleagues
 and/or
management
 team.
 They
 first
 encourage
 open
 communication
 between
 each
 other.
 The
 store
management
team
would
expect
the
sales
representative
to
take
initiative.
For
example,
a
client
walks
into
the
store
with
a
specific
need
she
would
like
to
satisfy;
for
this
purpose
she
needs
an
ensemble
because
she
is
entering
the
labour
market.
The
employee
servicing
the
client
may
not
have
a
personal
fit
with
the
client
or
be
able
to
find
something
which
the
client
is
satisfied
with.
This
can
be
because
she
is
not
satisfied
with
how
items
look
on
her
or
because
of
the
mood
she
is
in.
 She
 might
 feel
 discouraged
 because
 nothing
 looks
 good
 or
 is
 right
 for
 her.
 Because
 JACOB
 10
  • 11. encourages
sales
team
open
communication
and
team
spirit
(this
is
also
part
of
their
core
values),
management
 encourage
 other
 sales
 representatives
 to
 help
 out
 with
 the
 situation,
 to
 provide
direct
feedback
to
current
employees
or
clients.
It
can
be
as
simple
as
a
positive
comment
“I
really
did
like
that
red
blouse,
and
black
skirt
on
you.
I
found
it
complemented
your
feminine
figure
and
brought
out
your
eye
color.”
It
can
also
be
a
helping
hand
in
suggesting
her
teammate
to
see
if
her
client
would
like
that
new
skirt
or
blouse
they
just
received.
All
employees
are
encouraged
to
help
each
 other
 out
 and
 provide
 positive
 feedback.
 In
 the
 end
 it
 contributes
 to
 employee
 self
confidence,
low
turnover
rate
and
high
profits
(DELETE!!).


 An
 effective
 method
 that
 JACOB
 has
 implemented
 to
 provide
 feedback
 of
 an
 excellent
customer
 service
 is
 through
 the
 Situational,
 Task,
 Action,
 Results;
 STAR
 program.
 The
 STAR
program
is
an
indirect
way
to
provide
feedback
to
an
individual
who
has
shown
a
significant
effort
in
providing
great
customer
service
towards
any
client
or
contributing
to
the
success
of
any
of
the
four
 core
 values
 of
 JACOB.
 (Passion,
 Respect,
 Integrity,
 Team
 Spirit.)
 
 An
 employee
 of
 the
 sales
team
or
management
nominates
another
employee
by
describing
the
Situation,
Tasks
or
Action
an
individual
has
performed,
in
respect
to
the
four
core
values,
which
result
in
a
positive
or
profitable
outcome.
Let’s
take
our
example
of
above,
the
client
entering
the
work
force.
The
employee
who
helps
out
her
teammate
with
complimenting
or
suggesting
a
different
item
can
be
nominated
for
a
STAR.
 Her
 action
 was
 to
 help
 a
 teammate
 with
 a
 client
 having
 a
 negative
 image
 of
 herself,
 by
complementing
the
client
and
suggesting
another
skirt
design.
The
outcome
was
having
the
client
receive
 positive
 feedback
 from
 another
 person,
 making
 her
 feel
 better
 about
 herself,
 and
 also
making
as
sale,
and
the
core
values
related
were
Team
Spirit
and
Integrity
(Delete!).



 Once
the
STAR
form
is
completed,
the
STARs
of
that
month
are
placed
in
an
area
where
all
other
 sales
 representatives
 and
 management
 team
 can
 read
 them.
 This
 encourages
 open
communication
 within
 employees
 and
 also
 can
 help
 by
 providing
 an
 example
 for
 future
 similar
situations.
 At
the
end
of
 the
month
 during
 the
monthly
 meeting
the
management
team
gathers
the
entire
STARs
for
that
particular
month
and
has
a
draw.
The
STAR
which
is
randomly
picked
for
that
month
receives
a
$25
JACOB
gift
certificate
which
can
be
use
on
any
future
purchase.


 11
  • 12. 
 The
 other
 way
 in
 which
 JACOB
 currently
 encourages
 excellent
 customer
 service
 and
profitability
is
the
Remuneration
Per
Month,
RPM.
The
RPM
program
is
a
way
to
congratulate
and
reward
 all
 employees;
 management
 team,
 all
 sales
 representatives
 (Full‐time,
 Part‐time,
Temporary,
 and
 Seasonal.),
 any
 stock
 associate
 and
 visual
 associate.
 The
 way
 they
 receive
 the
reward
 is
 through
 attaining
 a
 minimum
 of
 a
 90%
 weekly
 sales
 objective
 and
 a
 minimum
 of
 an
overall
90%
of
monthly
sales
objective.
For
example,
if
the
store
attains
a
sales
objective
for
week
1‐
90%,
week
2‐75%,
week
3‐
110%
and
week
4‐
95%,
and
thus,
an
overall
monthly
sales
objective
of
92%,
all
the
employees
will
be
entitled
to
an
extra
of
$0.90
on
week
1,
zero
for
week
two,
(they
did
not
attain
the
minimum
weekly
objective),
$1.10
on
week
3
and
$0.95
on
week
four.
This
is
then
given
to
the
employee
as
a
bonus
reward
at
the
end
of
month
based
on
the
average
number
of
working
hours
they
completed
during
that
month.


 The
 last
 way
 to
 encourage
 an
 excellent
 customer
 service
 and
 provide
 profit
 to
 the
organization
is
through
internal
recruitment.
JACOB
is
always
on
the
lookout
for
future
Managers,
Assistant‐Managers,
Associate‐
Managers,
and
candidates
for
their
head
office.
The
job
openings
are
always
first
sent
at
store
level
for
an
internal
recruitment.

As
most
employees
hired
at
store
level
 are
 in
 the
 process
 of
 completing
 their
 education,
 it
 is
 encouraging
 to
 be
 able
 to
 move
 up
within
an
organization
and
be
part
of
the
evolution
of
the
organization.









JACOB’s
Analysis
 In
order
to
best
evaluate
JACOB’s
current
customer
service
performance,
four
of
our
group
members
 performed
 anonymous
 on‐site
 evaluations
 of
 four
 different
 JACOB’s
 stores’
 service.

 12
  • 13. Using
a
standard
questionnaire
that
evaluated
different
areas
of
customer
service,
we
wanted
to
evaluate
 whether
 JACOB
 employees
 were
 providing
 customer
 service
 that
 is
 up
 to
 the
 service
standards
that
JACOB
has
identified,
and
we
also
wanted
to
evaluate
whether
the
service
across
these
 different
 stores
 was
 uniform.
 The
 group
 visited
 JACOB
 stores
 located
 at;
 Complexe
 Dix10
(Brossard),
Complexe
Les
Ailes
de
la
Mode
(Downtown),
Galerie
d’Anjou
(Est‐End)
and
the
flagship
store
located
on
the
corner
of
St‐Catherine
and
Drummond.
Below
is
an
analysis
of
the
customer
service
that
was
delivered
during
these
four
evaluations.

Greeting
 3
out
of
4
stores
at
least
had
a
welcome
greeting
when
the
client
entered
the
store.
3
out
of
4
sales
representatives
did
not
bother
advising
the
client
on
any
of
the
sales
promotions
that
were
going
on
in
the
store
nor
did
the
sales
representative
offer
to
be
of
any
assistance.
In
this
respect,
the
store
in
Les
Ailes
scored
the
best
whereas
the
store
in
Brossard
scored
the
worst.


Transition
(Sales
Rep
Assistance
During
the
Shopping
Experience)
 The
Brossard
store
performed
very
badly
in
this
area,
there
was
no
help
offered,
the
sales
person
did
not
even
bother
to
find
out
about
the
clients
needs,
and
basically
there
was
no
attempt
to
try
to
find
out
what
the
client
was
going
to
buy.

 Out
 of
 the
 three
 other
 stores,
 only
 the
 St‐Catherine’s
 store
 sales
 person
 offered
 to
 help
and
wanted
to
find
out
about
the
clients
needs.

As
for
helping
the
client
with
the
fitting,
the
sales
representatives
 in
 these
 three
 stores
 were
 responsive.
 In
 trying
 to
 sell
 more
 items
 to
 the
 client,
the
representative
in
the
store
on
St‐Catherine
did
not
bother
to
find
out
what
additional
 items
would
interest
the
client.
The
sales
representatives
in
all
these
stores
offered
to
help
with
items
in
another
 store
 division.
 However
 only
 in
 the
 store
 in
 Complexe
 des
 Ailes
 was
 the
 sales
representative
available
for
extra
help
with
the
merchandise.

Fitting
room
 In
 general
 in
 this
 area,
 all
 the
 stores
 performed
 very
 poorly.
 In
 Brossard,
 they
 failed
completely
 when
 it
 came
 to
 this
 phase
 of
 the
 selling
 process.
 The
 store
 on
 St‐Catherine
 also
 13
  • 14. performed
very
poorly
and
the
only
thing
that
one
could
say
about
the
sales
representative
in
this
store
is
that
she
at
least
tried
to
explore
options
to
solve
problems
to
find
the
right
clothing.
The
sales
 rep
 in
 the
 store
 on
 Drummond
 performed
 very
 poorly
 in
 this
 case;
 not
 only
 did
 the
 sales
representative
 make
 no
 attempt
 to
 choose
 the
 right
 merchandise
 but
 instead
 tried
 to
 sell
additional
items
and
tried
to
sell
complementary
accessories.
The
sales
representative
in
the
store
of
 Complexe
 des
 Ailes
 performed
 the
 best,
 in
 that
 she
 offered
 her
 opinion
 on
 the
 merchandise,
made
suggestions
on
complimentary
accessories,
and
offered
to
look
at
other
store
divisions
for
additional
items.


Closing/Cash
Out
of
the
four
questionnaires,
3
of
them
are
applicable
to
the
closing
phase,
since
one
of
us
did
not
actually
purchase.
All
3
performed
very
poorly
in
the
closing
phase
of
the
sales
process.
The
sales
 representative
 all
 thanked
 the
 client
 for
 purchasing.
 
 But
 failed
 in
 talking
 about
 the
 three
other
 items
 that
 could
 have
 interested
 the
 client
 to
 purchase
 at
 the
 cash,
 these
 are
 the
 eau
 de
parfum,
a
candle
and
the
Jacob
ecological
bag.


Return
Transaction
 2
out
of
the
4
questionnaires
are
applicable
in
this
area
since
two
of
us
actually
returned
the
merchandise.
In
general,
these
two
stores
performed
well
when
it
came
to
accepting
returned
merchandise
from
the
client.
However,
they
could
have
tried
to
sell
something
else
to
the
client
in
exchange,
but
they
did
not.

Conclusion

 In
 general
 on
 the
 Likert
 Scale,
 the
 sales
 staff
 in
 the
 four
 stores
 performed
 very
 poorly.
However,
 the
 stores
 themselves
 are
 organized
 well,
 the
 merchandise
 is
 easy
 to
 find
 and
 the
atmosphere
 in
 the
 stores
 are
 pleasant.
 In
 3
 out
 of
 4
 cases,
 the
 client
 would
 not
 shop
 at
 Jacob
again.
And,
this
is
not
because
of
the
stores
or
the
merchandise,
but
as
a
result
of
the
experience
with
 the
 sales
 representative.
 For
 a
 store
 that
 has
 merchandise
 which
 is
 pricy,
 the
 service
component
is
missing.
Basic
service
is
expected
in
a
store
where
the
value
of
the
product
is
good
compared
to
the
price
(Delete!).

 14
  • 15. 

 There
is
some
noticeable
difference
in
the
service
of
the
store
of
Complexe
des
Ailes,
and
perhaps
depending
on
the
location
of
the
store
and
the
clientele,
some
of
the
Jacob
stores
seem
to
 offer
 better
 service.
 Because
 of
 the
 clientele
 that
 some
 of
 them
 have
 they
 feel
 they
 need
 to
step
up
to
the
higher
standard
and
expectation
from
the
client
(Delete!).


 The
 two
 other
 stores
 that
 were
 compared
 in
 our
 survey,
 i.e.
 Tristan
 and
 Mexx
 also
performed
very
poorly
on
all
customer
service
aspects.
These
two
stores
also
have
pricy
items
and
one
would
expect
better
service.
However,
because
of
the
low
price
compared
to
the
value
that
the
client
gets,
there
is
no
expectation
for
good
service,
and
the
stores
are
always
crowded
with
lots
 of
 clients
 shopping.
 The
 customer
 service
 at
 Mexx
 store
 was
 not
 any
 better,
 and
 they
performed
very
poorly
in
all
aspects.
Overall,
there
are
more
similarities
than
differences
between
the
Jacob
stores
chosen
(Delete!).















JACOB
Analysis
as
Related
to
Course
Concepts
 15
  • 16. 
Customer
Satisfaction

 Based
on
what
was
seen
during
our
group
members’
mystery
shopping
evaluations,
we
can
assume
 that
 one
 major
 problem
 that
 JACOB
 is
 facing
 is
 that
 the
 retail
 chain
 may
 presently
 or
eventually
 incur
 difficulties
 in
 terms
 of
 customer
 satisfaction.
 
 In
 fact,
 JACOB,
 through
 all
 its
documentation
 (i.e.
 website,
 corporate
 documentation,
 etc.)
 seems
 to
 place
 much
 emphasis
 on
customer
satisfaction,
stating
that
it
is
a
primary
concern
and
that
it
is
of
utmost
importance,
as
even
evidenced
by
the
response
that
the
JACOB
manager
herself
provided:
‘‘Customer
service
is
definitely
 a
 priority
 at
 JACOB’s.
 
 Every
 customer
 must
 feel
 unique;
 we
 try
 to
 offer
 her
 the
 best
shopping
 experience
 possible’’.
 
 JACOB
 has
 made
 itself
 a
 source
 of
 expectation
 levels
 for
 its
customers
by
stating
to
them
what
they
should
expect
from
their
experiences
in
JACOB
boutiques,
and
the
service
that
is
supposed
to
be
delivered
by
its
sales
representatives.




 However,
the
results
of
our
mystery
shopping
experiences
reveal
that,
while
JACOB
strives
to
 emphasize
 that
 it
 values
 customer
 satisfaction,
 actual
 performance
 does
 not
 truly
 match
 the
expectations
 that
 JACOB
 seems
 to
 want
 its
 customers
 to
 develop.
 
 In
 fact,
 in
 the
 four
 JACOB
boutiques
that
were
visited
by
our
group
members,
the
service
quality
level
was
nowhere
near
the
level
that
its
representatives
should
be
delivering
to
its
customers.

In
many
cases,
during
our
on‐site
evaluations,
our
group
members
were
not
assisted
throughout
their
shopping
experience
as
surely
JACOB
intends
its
sales
representatives
to
do
so.




 According
 to
 the
 concepts
 that
 were
 examined
 in
 class,
 customer
 dissatisfaction
 occurs
when
there
is
a
discrepancy
between
customers’
expectations
and
the
actual
performance
(level
of
 service
 quality)
 that
 they
 witness
 as
 delivered
 by
 JACOB
 employees.
 
 Thus,
 our
 evaluations
reveal
that
this
discrepancy
is
actually
occurring
at
the
present
time
in
JACOB
stores,
which
may
result
in
a
significant
amount
of
customer
dissatisfaction.

Therefore,
it
is
imperative
that
specific,
tactical
 actions
 and
 recommendations
 be
 implemented
 in
 order
 for
 JACOB
 to
 remediate
 this
discrepancy
and
attain
the
service
level
quality
that
the
company
intended
to
offer,
thus
ensuring
that
most,
if
not
all
of
its
customers
are
satisfied
with
their
service
experiences.

 16
  • 17. 
 Although
 we
 evaluated
 the
 service
 in
 four
 JACOB
 boutiques
 and
 the
 results
 were
 rather
disappointed,
 it
 is
 certainly
 not
 the
 case
 in
 all
 JACOB
 stores;
 some
 stores
 are
 probably
 giving
exceptional
service,
and
are
not
the
subject
of
this
project.

However,
the
problem
being
faced
is
that
the
service
quality
level
in
JACOB
stores
is
not
uniform
across
all
its
stores,
and
thus
customer
service
 variability,
 which
 is
 one
 of
 the
 four
 service
 characteristics,
 is
 a
 major
 concern
 for
 this
company.
 
 We
 believe
 that
 the
 recommendations
 that
 will
 be
 proposed
 in
 the
 following
 section
have
the
potential
 to
reduce
service
variability
 in
JACOB
Boutiques,
and
possibly
 even
make
the
service
encounter
more
tangible
for
customers,
which
can
result
in
service
improvement
for
the
company.



 Assuming
that
the
service
quality
level
that
our
group
members
experienced
when
visiting
JACOB
stores
is
actually
the
same
as
that
being
experienced
on
a
daily
basis
by
JACOB’s
customers
and
that
our
evaluations
were
accurate,
JACOB
may
be
conditioning
its
customers
to
perceive
this
service
level
as
being
acceptable
and
normal
for
JACOB
stores,
and
as
one
that
is
to
be
expected
when
 visiting
 the
 retail
 stores.
 
 Therefore,
 in
 their
 minds,
 when
 they
 think
 of
 JACOB
 Boutiques,
they
may
automatically
associate
the
company
with
unsatisfactory
service,
which,
obviously,
can
have
 disastrous
 implications
 for
 a
 company
 such
 as
 JACOB
 who
 states
 not
 only
 in
 its
 internal
documentation,
but
also
on
its
website,
that
one
of
its
major
strengths
is
customer
service.

JACOB
can
 possibly
 be
 harming
 its
 credibility,
 and
 its
 customers
 may
 even
 engage
 in
 negative
 word‐of‐mouth
 after
 receiving
 disappointing
 service,
 which,
 as
 was
 discussed
 in
 class,
 can
 have
 an
incredibly
negative
effect
on
the
company’s
overall
profitability.



Customer
Loyalty

 According
to
the
manager
questionnaire,
out
of
a
100%
customer
base,
only
approximately
10%
 of
 their
 customers
 are
 customers
 who
 return
 to
 JACOB
 every
 season,
 while
 approximately
20%
 return
 every
 month.
 
 Whereas
 our
 group
 believes
 that
 the
 latter
 percentage
 is
 relatively
satisfactory
 (Delete!),
 The
 first
 percentage,
 that
 of
 customers
 who
 return
 every
 season,
 is
according
 to
 our
 group,
 significantly
 low
 and
 needs
 to
 be
 addressed
 as
 it
 may
 be
 a
 source
 of
concern
for
the
retail
chain.

We
feel
that
there
are
some
actions
that
JACOB
Boutiques
can
take
to
improve
the
current
situation
and
ensure
that
a
higher
percentage
of
its
customers
return
every
 17
  • 18. season.
 
 Furthermore,
 if
 JACOB
 is
 capable
 of
 successfully
 implementing
 these
 actions,
 this
 may
result
in
its
customers
feeling
more
positive
affect
towards
the
stores,
and
feeling
as
though
they
are
 valued
 by
 the
 retail
 chain,
 which
 may
 not
 actually
 be
 the
 case
 at
 the
 present
 time,
 as
evidenced
by
the
store
evaluations
performed
by
our
group
members.

Consequently,
if
customers
feel
 more
 positively
 and
 feel
 as
 though
 they
 are
 served
 by
 sales
 representative
 in
 a
 way
 that
 is
desirable
to
them,
this
may
create
a
more
pronounced
sense
of
attachment.

This,
coupled
with
promotional
efforts
which
will
be
discussed
shortly,
could
potentially
help
the
company
to
achieve
a
 higher
 degree
 of
 loyalty.
 
 More
 specifically,
 the
 company
 may
 be
 successful
 in
 moving
 its
customers
from
not
being
loyal,
or
from
demonstrating
inertia
loyalty,
to
latent
or
even
premium
loyalty.

The
‘‘Moment
of
Truth’’
at
JACOB
Stores
and
SERVQUAL
Dimension

 According
 to
 our
 group
 member
 evaluations,
 the
 service
 quality
 that
 is
 experienced
 by
JACOB
customers
in
the
stores’
fitting
rooms
is
less
than
desirable,
which
has
many
implications
for
the
firm.

In
fact,
only
1
out
of
four
of
our
group
members
was
thoroughly
satisfied
with
the
help
that
was
offered
to
her
in
fitting
rooms,
and
if
this
number
is
generalized
to
JACOB’s
whole
customer
 base,
 only
 25%
 of
 them
 may
 be
 currently
 satisfied.
 
 In
 retail
 shopping,
 for
 items
 that
need
to
be
tried
on
in
order
for
the
purchase
decision
to
be
made,
the
time
spent
in
the
fitting
rooms
 becomes
 ‘‘the
 moment
 of
 truth’’
 for
 JACOB
 customers.
 
 Therefore,
 JACOB
 may
 not
 be
performing
 satisfactorily,
 or
 even
 to
 the
 service
 quality
 level
 that
 they
 promise,
 during
 this
important
‘‘moment
of
truth’’,
which
may
be
very
damaging
to
the
company’s
overall
profitability.

Thus,
 the
 recommendations
 that
 will
 be
 proposed
 must
 focus
 on
 improving
 the
 fitting
 room
experience,
 which
 is
 such
 an
 important
 moment
 for
 sales
 to
 be
 made.
 
 Furthermore,
 the
 fitting
room
is
the
area
of
the
service
encounter
where
sales
representatives
can
demonstrate
that
they
are
 responsive
 to
 customers
 (bring
 them
 different
 sizes,
 help
 them
 find
 a
 new
 piece
 of
 clothing
when
one
tried
on
does
not
fit,
etc),
and
implementing
tactical
actions
to
improve
the
fitting
room
experience
 can
 thus
 also
 improve
 customers’
 perception
 of
 JACOB
 employees’
 responsiveness,
which
is
one
of
the
five
SERVQUAL
dimensions
of
service
quality.


The
Gaps
Model

 At
the
present
time,
JACOB’s
current
customer
service
performance
may
be
causing
gaps
 18
  • 19. as
perceived
by
customers,
and
as
seen
in
the
Gaps
Model.

First
of
all,
there
may
be
a
customer
gap,
 defined
 as
 a
 discrepancy
 between
 customer
 expectations
 and
 customers’
 perceptions
 of
JACOB’s
 service
 performance.
 
 Furthermore,
 there
 may
 presently
 be
 a
 communication
 gap,
described
as
the
inconsistency
between
JACOB’s
external
communications
to
customers
of
what
to
 expect
 in
 terms
 of
 service
 quality,
 and
 customers’
 actual
 perception
 of
 the
 service
 quality
offered
to
them.

In
fact,
as
previously
mentioned,
the
communications
efforts
done
by
JACOB
is
presently
raising
customers’
expectations
levels
of
the
firm’s
service,
while,
according
to
our
on‐site
research,
performance
is
at
a
lower
level
than
it
should
be,
thus
resulting
in
the
two
types
of
gaps
previously
described.

Finally,
there
is
definitely
a
delivery
gap,
as
evidenced
by
the
fact
that
JACOB
has
in
fact
identified
customer‐driven
service
designs
and
standards
(which
can
be
found
in
corporate
 documentation);
 however,
 these
 standards
 seem
 not
 to
 be
 presently
 respected
according
to
our
on‐site
evaluations.

As
a
matter
of
fact,
the
JACOB
manager
that
was
interviewed
stated
the
following:
‘‘in
theory,
if
employees
did
exactly
what
they
were
supposed
to,
followed
the
manuals
and
did
what
they
were
taught
in
training,
I
believe
our
overall
service
grade
would
be
 approximately
 90%.
 
 However,
 that
 is
 not
 actually
 the
 case
 in
 practice,
 and
 stores
 are
performing
below
that
level’’.

Therefore,
there
is
obviously
a
significant
discrepancy
between
the
standards
developed
and
the
actual
service
delivery
of
JACOB
sales
representatives.











List
of
Recommendations
/
Notes
on
past
recommendations:
 19
  • 20. We
 believe
 that
 JACOB
 should
 adopt
 either
 the
 low‐cost
 accommodation
 or
 (delete!)
uncompromised
reduction
solution
in
order
to
serve
its
customers
more
efficiently.

By
choosing
either
of
these
solutions,
we
will
choose
programs
and
actions
that
are
of
relatively
low
cost,
but
that
will
enhance
their
relationships
with
their
customers,
thus
increasing
overall
firm
profitability.

1) 
VIP
night
/
cocktail
night,
view
collection
in
advance
for
best
clients.
 JACOB
 could
 organize,
 on
 a
 bi‐yearly
 basis
 (at
 the
 beginning
 of
 every
 season,
 i.e.
 fall/winter
and
spring/summer)
a
VIP
cocktail
night,
whereby
its
most
loyal
and
profitable
customers
would
get
the
chance
to
view
a
fashion
show
of
the
new
clothing
line
that
is
coming
out
that
season.

This
recommendation
would
be
in
line
with
the
concepts
discussed
in
the
article,
‘‘Why
Service
Stinks’’,
which
states
that
a
company’s
most
profitable
customers
must
receive
the
‘‘royal
treatment’’,
and
which
is
exactly
what
JACOB
would
be
doing
in
this
case.

By
organizing
such
an
event,
sending
out
special
invitations
addressed
to
its
best
customers,
the
latter
would
feel
extremely
privileged,
and
as
though
they
are
valued
by
JACOB
Boutiques
Inc.,
which
we
believe
would
encourage
them
to
keep
 purchasing
 regularly
 in
 order
 to
 keep
 receiving
 the
 invitations
 to
 these
 events.
 
 Also,
customers
would
feel
an
attachment
to
the
company,
thus
possibly
moving
them
from
the
inertia
loyalty
quadrant,
to
the
premium
or
latent
loyalty
quadrant.


ADD::::









Although
there
would
be
some
costs
associated
with
this
type
of
event,
JACOB
can
make
it
as
low‐cost
 as
 possible
 while
 still
 benefitting
 from
 the
 advantages
 that
 the
 VIP
 night
 would
 bring
(increased
loyalty,
increased
sales
=
profitability!).

In
fact,
the
event
does
not
necessarily
have
to
be
held
at
a
fancy
and
costly
location,
but
it
could
rather
occur
directly
in
JACOB
Boutiques,
after
closing
hours.

Or
alternatively,
in
order
for
these
events
to
be
profitable
for
the
company,
JACOB
could
organize
fancier
fashion
shows,
but
enable
its
invited
customers
to
purchase
items
from
the
collection
before
they
are
released
in
stores,
thus
creating
a
sentiment
of
exclusivity
for
its
loyal
customers.




 
 2) Waiting
Room
 We
recommend
setting
up
a
lounge‐style
waiting
area
where
friends
and/or
family
members
can
 wait
 while
 the
 customer
 tries
 clothing
 on.
 
 JACOB
 could
 install
 flat
 screen
 TV’s
 and
 display
 20
  • 21. magazines
(car,
fitness,
gossip,
and
women’s
magazines)
to
occupy
those
waiting.

We
understand
that
family
members
and
friends
who
accompany
JACOB
customers
have
the
potential
to
sway
the
latter
into
making
purchasing
decisions,
so
we
believe
JACOB
should
also
be
aware
of
them
and
aim
to
please
them
so
that
they
too,
can
develop
a
positive
affect
towards
our
retail
chain.

We
recommend
keeping
them
occupied
for
as
long
as
possible
so
that
our
customer
who
tries
clothing
on
 feels
 comfortable
 to
 take
 her
 time
 and
 try
 on
 as
 many
 articles
 of
 clothing
 as
 she
 would
 like
without
worrying
that
those
who
are
with
her
are
impatiently
waiting.

Although
we
acknowledge
that
 there
 will
 be
 some
 costs
 incurred
 in
 terms
 of
 the
 purchase
 of
 one
 or
 two
 flat
 screen
televisions,
a
couple
of
lounge
chairs,
magazine
subscriptions,
we
also
believe
that
the
advantages
of
 setting
 up
 a
 waiting
 room
 has
 the
 potential
 to
 increase
 sales
 for
 JACOB
 Boutiques
 Inc.,
 thus
improving
the
overall
profitability
of
the
company.


 
 3) Emails

 With
the
objective
of
increasing
both
customer
acquisition
and
retention,
we
believe
it
would
be
 beneficial
 to
 JACOB
 Boutiques
 Inc.
 to
 send
 emails
 to
 both
 non‐customers
 and
 current
customers,
as
it
would
prove
to
be
communication
vehicle
that
has
the
potential
to
reach
many
customers,
and
at
a
low
cost,
thus
increasing
JACOB’s
profitability.

We
recommend
that
each
time
a
customer
is
about
to
exit
a
JACOB
boutique,
a
sales
representative
acquires
her
email
address,
regardless
of
whether
she
purchases
an
article
of
clothing
that
day,
or
even
whether
she
has
ever
bought
an
article
of
clothing
at
a
JACOB
boutique.

By
acquiring
her
email
address,
the
retail
chain
could
send
her
information
pertaining
to
special
offers,
upcoming
sales,
the
introduction
of
a
new
seasonal
 line,
 special
 events,
 news,
 etc.
 
 The
 email
 should
 be
 addressed
 to
 her
 using
 her
 first
(delete!)
 name,
 so
 that
 she
 can
 feel
 personally
 contacted,
 thus
 fostering
 a
 sentiment
 of
attachment
and
as
though
she
is
a
valuable
customer.

We
therefore
believe
that
this
would
result
in
more
frequent
visits
to
the
store,
and
hopefully,
more
purchases,
thus
enabling
JACOB
to
attain
a
higher
level
of
profitability.


 
 4) Speak
to
customers
using
their
first
names
 We
 also
 believe
 that
 JACOB
 sales
 representatives
 should
 address
 their
 customers
 using
their
 first
 or
 last
 name,
 in
 order
 to
 give
 them
 an
 impression
 that
 a
 relationship
 is
 being
 formed
 21
  • 22. with
JACOB’s
employees,
once
again
giving
them
a
feeling
of
attachment
to
the
retail
chain,
and
making
 them
 feel
 valued
 as
 a
 customer.
 
 The
 sales
 representative
 should
 ask
 the
 customer
 her
name
when
the
articles
of
clothing
are
picked
up
from
the
customer
and
put
into
a
fitting
room.

5)
Physical
Service
Environment

 Moreover,
 JACOB
 should
 try
 to
 enhance
 its
 physical
 service
 environment.
 
 As
 has
 been
discussed
in
class,
putting
emphasis
on
the
physical
service
environment
can
have
many
positive
effects
on
the
customer’s
service
encounter
and
shopping
experience.

In
fact,
it
can
‘‘establish
a
distinctive
image
or
positioning,
grab
customers’
attention,
create
moods
or
mindsets,
and
affect
customers’
 service
 quality
 perceptions’’,
 all
 of
 which
 could
 benefit
 the
 company.
 
 More
specifically,
 we
 suggest
 emphasizing
 a
 few
 ambience
 conditions.
 
 First,
 JACOB
 has
 recently
introduced
what
it
calls
an
ambience
fragrance,
which
is
a
perfume
that
customers
can
wear.

We
suggest
that
sales
representatives
regularly
spray
(i.e.
every
hour
or
two)
the
fragrance
into
the
air
so
 that
 the
 smell
 permeates
 the
 store.
 
 Consequently,
 customers
 would
 be
 greeted
 with
 the
pleasant
 smell
 as
 soon
 as
 they
 enter
 the
 store,
 thus
 associating
 the
 fragrance
 with
 JACOB
Boutiques.

The
smell,
which
is
soft
enough
to
appeal
to
all
customers,
could
have
the
potential
to
create
 positive
 affect
 among
 customers,
 thus
 enhancing
 the
 overall
 shopping
 experience.

Furthermore,
in
terms
of
music,
JACOB
should
select
music
that
appeals
to
its
20
to
40‐year
old
target
market,
but
that
is
also
relatively
slow
in
tempo
in
order
to
entice
them
to
stay
inside
the
store
as
long
as
possible
so
as
to
increase
sales.




6)
Fitting
Room
Lights
 According
to
our
on‐site
evaluations,
one
area
in
which
JACOB
has
to
improve
the
service
quality
is
in
the
fitting
rooms.

In
fact,
most
of
our
group
members
felt
that
the
fitting
room
service
was
 quite
 dissatisfying,
 which
 can
 definitely
 result
 in
 lost
 sales
 for
 the
 company.
 
 In
 order
 to
enhance
 the
 fitting
 room
 service
 encounter,
 we
 recommend
 introducing
 an
 element
 that
 we
believe
 could
 be
 very
 successful,
 and
 that
 is,
 at
 the
 present
 time,
 relatively
 uncommon
 in
 the
Canadian
 retail
 market.
 
 We
 suggest
 hanging
 a
 light
 outside
 of
 each
 fitting
 room,
 which
 each
customer
 can
 turn
 on
 from
 inside
 her
 fitting
 room
 as
 soon
 as
 she
 needs
 assistance
 from
 a
 sales
representative,
whether
it
is
for
(delete)
she
needs
to
get
another
size,
color,
or
simply
to
ask
for
 22
  • 23. her
 advice.
 
 We
 believe
 fitting
 room
 lights
 will
 engage
 the
 customer
 and
 demonstrate
responsiveness
 on
 behalf
 of
 the
 sales
 representatives
 and
 of
 the
 overall
 company
 overall.

Customers
 will
 feel
 as
 though
 they
 are
 truly
 being
 catered
 to,
 as
 though
 their
 needs
 as
 very
important,
and
that
they
are
valuable
as
an
individual
customer.



7)
Waiting
lines
 At
 certain
 periods
 during
 the
 year,
 for
 example,
 during
 the
 Christmas
 holidays,
 at
 closing
time,
during
 sales
 etc.,
waiting
 lines
 can
 become
common
 and
 long
 at
 JACOB
 stores,
which
 may
occur
 in
 many
 other
 stores
 who
 have
 to
 deal
 with
 a
 high
 number
 of
 customers
 and
 a
 limited
number
of
sales
representatives.

However,
this
is
undesirable
for
all
stores,
JACOB
included,
since
customers
may
not
deem
the
waiting
time
as
worthwhile,
and
whereas
they
normally
would
have
purchased
clothing,
they
may
simply
leave
the
line,
return
the
clothing
to
its
place,
and
exit
the
store
 without
 purchasing.
 
 Therefore,
 we
 believe
 it
 is
 necessary
 for
 JACOB
 to
 think
 of
 a
 way
 to
keep
its
customers
occupied
and
entertained
while
waiting
in
line.

Once
again,
JACOB
could
install
a
flat
screen
television
for
its
customers
to
look
at
while
they
wait.

This
television
could
display
JACOB
articles
of
clothing,
the
new
season’s
line,
JACOB
advertisements,
videos
of
fashion
shows
that
will
have
taken
place,
and
other
videos
related
to
fashion
and
the
company.

Once
again,
the
cost
 of
 the
 television
 will
 have
 to
 be
 taken
 into
 account,
 but
 if
 its
 purchase
 and
 installations
ensures
that
JACOB
will
not
lose
sales
due
to
customers
not
wanting
to
wait
in
line,
the
purchase
is
definitely
 justified
 and
 may
 in
 fact
 increase
 each
 store’s
 profitability.
 
 Furthermore,
 profitability
could
also
increase
due
to
customers
being
exposed
to
pictures
of
other
articles
of
clothing
that
they
might
not
have
seen
while
walking
around
in
the
store,
which
would
be
an
opportunity
for
additional
sales.



8)
Loyalty
Program
(benefits/loyalty
card)
 JACOB
Boutiques
Inc.
currently
has
no
loyalty
program
to
entice
its
customers
to
return
to
its
 stores
 regularly,
 nor
 to
 spend
 large
 amounts.
 
 Therefore,
 we
 recommend
 that
 the
 company
puts
one
in
place
in
order
to
increase
the
number
of
customers
who
shop
in
its
stores
at
least
once
per
 month
 (which
 is
 currently
 10%),
 and
 thus,
 to
 increase
 the
 firm’s
 profitability.
 
 JACOB
 could
record
 every
 purchase
 above
 $20
 (should
 be
 increased
 to
 $50)
 that
 each
 customer
 makes,
 and
 23
  • 24. every
 year,
 customers
 who
 have
 purchased
 at
 least
 twelve
 times
 throughout
 the
 year
 (or
 over
$700
throughout
the
year)
benefits
from
special
advantages.

For
example,
these
customers
could
be
 given
 a
 free
 item
 at
 the
 end
 of
 the
 year,
 or
 a
 free
 half‐hour
 session
 with
 a
 JACOB
stylist/designer
(see
next
recommendation).

These
loyal
customers
could
exclusively
get
invited
to
the
 yearly
 JACOB
 blowout
 sale
 (which
 could
 occur
 during
 an
 evening
 after
 regular
 store
 hours).

Furthermore,
 as
 mentioned
 in
 the
 VIP
 night
 recommendation,
 we
 believe
 the
 most
 profitable
customers
 could
 be
 invited
 to
 VIP
 nights
 with
 pre‐viewing
 of
 the
 season’s
 new
 collections.

company
should
organize
a
seasonal
JACOB
fashion
show
which
would
display
each
season’s
new
clothing
line.

The
company’s
best
and
most
profitable
customers
would
be
invited
to
the
show,
and
 would
 have
 the
 exclusive
 privilege
 of
 viewing
 the
 company’s
 new
 lines
 at
 this
 prestigious
event
 before
 it
 is
 introduced
 in
 its
 stores
 to
 all
 its
 regular
 customers
 (Delete!!).
 
 The
 exclusive
opportunity
 could
 definitely
 provide
 the
 incentive
 to
 JACOB
 customers
 to
 purchase
 regularly,
which
 could
 prove
 to
 be
 very
 beneficial
 to
 the
 company’s
 profitability,
 and
 increase
 customers’
lifetime
value.



9)

Monthly
visit
by
a
fashion
stylist

 Moreover,
JACOB
could
arrange
for
a
fashion
stylist
or
one
of
the
company’s
designers
to
be
 present
 in
 their
 stores
 at
 a
 predetermined
 time
 every
 month
 (the
 stylist
 could
 travel
 to
 all
JACOB
stores
in
Quebec
within
a
one‐month
period).

In
fact,
the
company
could
have
the
expert
in
 the
 stores
 to
 give
 fashion
 advice
 to
 JACOB’s
 customers,
 which
 would
 definitely
 help
 the
company
to
up‐sell.

The
stylist
could
try
to
assemble
outfits
for
customers,
which
could
definitely
result
 in
 higher
 total
 purchases
 than
 if
 he/she
 was
 not
 on‐site,
 thus
 having
 the
 potential
 to
improve
 the
 company’s
 bottom
 line.
 
 Also,
 as
 mentioned
 above,
 the
 company’s
 most
 profitable
customers
 could
 have
 the
 privilege
 of
 getting
 a
 free
 half‐hour
 session
 with
 the
 stylist,
 thus
resulting
in
higher
overall
customer
loyalty,
and
also
potentially
creating
a
sense
of
attachment
to
the
company
for
many
of
JACOB’s
customers.



10)
More
extensive
employee
training

 JACOB
Boutiques
Inc.
should
consider
giving
its
employees
more
extensive
training
in
order
to
ensure
 that
 they
 will
 provide
 exemplary
 service
 to
 all
 its
 customers,
 and
 also
 to
 emphasize
 the
 24
  • 25. importance
 of
 customer
 service
 within
 the
 company.
 
 Currently,
 when
 an
 individual
 is
 hired
 to
 become
 part
 of
 the
 JACOB
 sales
 team,
 she
 receives
 only
 three
 hours
 of
 training,
 which
 rapidly
 covers
 issues
 such
 as
 appropriate
 customer
 service
 delivery,
 material
 handling,
 etc.
 
 Even
 the
 manager
 that
 we
 interviewed
 acknowledged
 that
 more
 training
 would
 be
 desirable
 and
 advantageous
for
the
company.

In
fact,
she
recommends
‘‘to
train
employees
more
in
depth
to
 become
more
knowledgeable
about
JACOB
products,
and
for
areas
such
as
lingerie
training,
new
 product
 line
 training,
 clothing
 fabrication
 and
 caring
 instructions
 training,
 etc.”
 
 Also,
 we
 recommend
performing
a
follow‐up
training
with
employees
six
months
after
being
hired,
in
order
 to
reinforce
the
initial
training,
refresh
their
memories
about
standards,
responsibilities,
and
also
 to
re‐emphasize
the
importance
of
good
customer
service.

We
believe
this
would
be
a
good
way
 to
make
the
employees
feel
engaged
in
the
company
and
to
develop
a
feeling
of
attachment,
as
 well
as
to
remind
them
that
they
all
constitute
a
member
of
the
JACOB
team.

As
we
have
seen,
a
 happy
and
attached
employee
contributes
positively
to
a
company’s
bottom
line.

 
 Furthermore,
 within
 one
 month
 of
 being
 hired,
 all
 employees
 should
 have
 an
 individual,
 preliminary
evaluation
with
their
managers
during
which
the
latter
can
discuss
with
the
employee
 what
 she
 is
 doing
 correctly,
 and
 which
 elements
 of
 her
 customer
 service
 delivery
 are
 dissatisfactory
and
must
be
improved
immediately.

The
manager
can
also
use
this
opportunity
to
 give
 tips
 and
 advice
 to
 employees
 pertaining
 to
 how
 she
 can
 develop
 customer
 relationships
 in
 more
depth,
as
well
as
tricks
and
methods
to
deal
with
demanding
and
difficult
customers.



 Furthermore,
 it
 would
 also
 be
 desirable
 for
 JACOB
 to
 further
 develop
 and
 quantify
 strict
 service
 standards
 for
 employees
 to
 respect
 in
 different
 areas
 of
 their
 customer
 service,
 which
 would
 result
 in
 more
 tangible
 customer
 service
 that
 would
 also
 be
 easier
 for
 managers
 to
 evaluate.
 
 For
 example,
 every
 customer
 has
 to
 be
 greeted
 within
 ten
 seconds
 after
 they
 have
 entered
the
store,
and
when
they
are
in
the
fitting
room,
they
must
be
asked
within
two
minutes
 whether
they
need
another
size
or
color
of
the
clothing
article,
or
whether
they
need
any
other
 kind
of
help.

These
standards
would
enable
managers
to
be
better
able
to
evaluate
whether
their
 employees
are
providing
satisfactory
customer
service.
 
 We
also
believe
managers
must
become
stricter
in
evaluating
their
employees,
since
as
we
 25
  • 26. have
 seen,
 many
 JACOB
 store
 employees
 are
 not
 performing
 up
 to
 the
 company’s
 service
standards,
 which
 could
 definitely
 damage
 the
 company
 in
 the
 long
 term.
 
 Managers
 must
 not
tolerate
service
that
is
not
courteous
and
exemplary,
which
seems
to
actually
be
the
case
at
the
present
 time.
 
 Actually,
 the
 manager
 that
 we
 interviewed
 admitted
 that
 if
 an
 employee
 is
 not
performing
satisfactorily,
managers
will
meet
with
her
to
discuss
the
problems
at
hand,
and
that
only
after
‘‘a
VERY
long
period
of
time
of
dissatisfactory
service
will
an
employee
be
fired’’.

This
is
unacceptable
for
a
company
that
claims
that
excellent
customer
service
is
at
the
forefront
of
its
objectives;
during
that
‘‘very
long
period
of
time
of
undesirable
service
delivery’’,
an
employee
has
ample
time
to
damage
the
firm’s
relationships
with
its
customers,
which
JACOB
must
absolutely
not
tolerate.

Managers
must
be
strict
in
asking
their
employees
to
respect
the
service
standards
that
 are
 communicated
 to
 customers,
 and
 more
 severe
 punishments
 must
 be
 given
 to
 non‐confirming
 employees.
 
 We
 suggest
 JACOB
 implement
 mystery
 shopper
 evaluations
 in
 order
 to
better
identify
employees
who
are
not
willing
to
perform
up
to
standards,
and
also
the
employees
who
simply
do
not
fit
with
the
company’s
vision
of
excellent
customer
service
delivery.



11)
Customer
complaints
 JACOB
must
identify
a
method
to
encourage
their
customers
to
share
their
comments
with
the
 company
 (whether
 positive
 or
 negative),
 thus
 providing
 opportunities
 for
 service
 recovery
when
an
undesirable
service
encounter
occurs.

Presently,
there
is
a
‘‘contact
us’’
section
on
the
website,
 but
 as
 we
 have
 discussed
 in
 class,
 many
 customers
 do
 not
 share
 their
 negative
experiences
 with
 the
 company
 unless
 they
 are
 actively
 encouraged
 to
 do
 so,
 or
 are
 given
 an
incentive
 to
 do
 so.
 
 
 Therefore,
 JACOB
 must
 do
 even
 more
 to
 entice
 its
 customers
 to
 complain
because
failing
to
do
so
can
result
in
lost
clients,
along
with
their
lifetime
values.

Customers
must
feel
 as
 though
 their
 comments
 are
 valuable
 and
 as
 though
 they
 will
 receive
 distributive,
procedural,
 and
 interactional
 justice.
 
 We
 suggest
 that
 when
 a
 member
 of
 management
 reads
about
 a
 particularly
 negative
 comment,
 they
 contact
 the
 customer
 in
 question
 and
 discuss
 with
them
what
happened,
in
order
to
rectify
the
situation
and
make
the
customer
feel
as
though
all
types
of
justices
have
been
attained.


 
 Furthermore,
 we
 recommend
 encouraging
 customers
 to
 share
 their
 comments
 by
 26
  • 27. inscribing
a
comment
at
the
bottom
of
their
bill,
saying,
for
example,
‘‘come
visit
our
website;
we
want
to
hear
from
you!
Your
comments
are
valuable
to
us’’.


Often,
customers
refuse
to
complain
or
 share
 their
 comments
 because
 they
 feel
 that
 what
 they
 have
 to
 say
 will
 not
 be
 heard,
 but
emphasizing
 at
 the
 bottom
 of
 the
 bill
 that
 their
 comments
 are
 valued
 may
 entice
 them
 to
 do
(delete!)
communicate
with
the
company.

Also,
JACOB
could
have
a
contest
whereby
one
person
who
has
communicated
their
comments
with
the
company
will
randomly
be
chosen
to
win
a
$500
gift
certificate
in
a
JACOB
store,
or
the
company
could
partner
with
a
travel
agency
for
the
latter
to
give
away
a
vacation
in
exchange
for
advertisement
on
JACOB’s
website
(the
trip
would
be
given
free
 of
 charge
 from
 the
 travel
 agency,
 thus
 not
 harming
 JACOB’s
 profitability).
 
 Once
 again,
 this
contest
 should
 be
 communicated
 on
 the
 bottom
 of
 a
 bill.
 
 
 We
 believe
 this
 would
 result
 in
increased
profitability
for
the
firm
because,
although
costs
may
be
incurred
due
to
the
contest,
the
firm
would
have
a
better
control
of
customer
complaints,
possibly
resulting
in
a
higher
customer
retention
rate.

We
believe
the
contests’
relatively
low
cost
would
be
worthwhile
to
incur
when
considering
the
numerous
customer
lifetime
values
that
could
be
retained.


 
 Finally,
JACOB
should
further
communicate
its
commitment
to
customer
service
excellence
through
 documentation
 and
 on
 its
 website.
 
 In
 fact,
 through
 these
 communication
 vehicles,
 the
company
 could
 emphasize
 that
 its
 customers
 are
 extremely
 important
 to
 it(delete!).
 
 JACOB
Boutiques
 Inc.
 could
 display
 a
 plaque
 at
 the
 cash
 register,
 describing
 the
 (delete!)
 not
 only
 the
importance
of
its
customers,
but
also
its
return
policy.

They
could
also
display,
within
each
store,
a
service
blueprint,
which
educates
their
customers
as
to
what
is
to
be
expected
during
the
service
encounter,
 what
 their
 responsibilities
 are
 (inform
 the
 sales
 representatives
 of
 what
 they
 really
want,
what
doesn’t
fit
and
why,
complain
when
they
have
experienced
service
failure,
etc.),
and
what
the
onstage
contact
employees’
actions
should
be.

Furthermore,
on
the
company
website,
instead
 of
 just
 having
 a
 ‘‘contact
 us’’
 section,
 the
 same
 information
 could
 be
 displayed
 ‘‘service
blueprint’’
 information
 could
 be
 displayed
 in
 order
 to
 inform
 customers
 of
 JACOB’s
 engagement
towards
customer
service.

12)
Website
 JACOB
currently
has
a
website,
on
which
customers
can
view
new
collections,
view
photo
 27
  • 28. galleries
of
stores,
customers
can
join
the
company
on
Facebook,
etc.,
(add)
and
there
is
even
a
customer
service
section,
where
clients
can
read
about
the
return
policy
and
contact
the
company
if
 they
 need
 to
 (delete!).
 
 We
 have
 identified
 a
 new
 website
 opportunity
 that
 could
 enable
customers
 to
 become
 even
 more
 engaged
 and
 attached
 while
 shopping
 on
 the
 company’s
website.

We
believe
it
would
be
profitable
for
the
company
to
develop
an
online
program
on
its
website
 whereby
 customers
 could
 not
 only
 view
 new
 collections,
 but
 JACOB
 could
 also
 set‐up
 a
virtual
model/mannequin
that
customers
could
dress
themselves
and
put
together
outfits
on.

This
would
enable
them
to
visualize
potential
outfits
that
they
would
be
interested
in
buying,
whereas
they
may
not
have
been
as
interested
to
do
all
this
work
in
the
boutique
itself.

They
could
play
with
different
items
and
try
to
match
them
together,
which
could
also
increase
positive
affect
and
attachment
 towards
 seasonal
 collections.
 
 This
 program
 would
 prove
 to
 be
 less
 time‐consuming
and
pleasant
for
customers,
all
the
while
potentially
increasing
the
firm’s
profitability.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 28
  • 29. Conclusion
 Overall
 JACOB
 main
 focus
 and
 success
 is
 based
 on
 the
 customer
 willingness
 to
 purchase.
We
 believe
 by
 implementing
 some
 of
 our
 recommendation
 in
 the
 near
 future
 and
 other
 in
 the
next
 few
 years,
 will
 help
 increase
 JACOB
 overall
 profitability.
 Economic
 times
 are
 difficult
 these
days
 and
 JACOB
 needs
 to
 go
 beyond
 their
 standard
 customer
 service
 abilities.
 By
 providing
extensive
training
and
immediate
follow
up
of
sales
representative
success
or
failure
will
ensure
that
 all
 JACOB
 stores
 are
 operating
 uniformly
 and
 to
 their
 maximum
 ability
 and
 best
 intention.

The
 end
 result
 to
 provide
 an
 even
 better
 customer
 service
 experience,
 increasing
 customer
retention,
increase
customer
brand
loyalty
and
maximise
store
and
organizational
profits.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 29
  • 30. Appendix
A‐Manager
Questionnaire
and
Answers Dear Anne-Marie and Chloe, We are currently constructing a project for our MARK 480- Customer Service Excellent given by Prof. Hakkyun Kim from Concordia University. We would appreciate your help in answering the following 13 questions. All information is for research purposes only and will only be shared with my university colleagues, Christine Joyal, Gabrielle Abergel, Nadia Forghani, and Aurore Pak. We are looking into how Boutique JACOB encourages positive customer service towards their clients and also how Boutique JACOB differentiates itself from competitors. Our MARK-480- Customer Service Excellent team thanks you for your cooperation and participation to our group project. Please as much information as possible by answering the questions below, where applicable. 1) What are the company’s core competencies and values (design, providing value, marketing, customer service?) o Customer service is definitely a priority at Jacob. The customer has to feel she is unique. We try to offer the best shopping experience possible. o There are four main values at Jacob: respect, passion, team work and integrity. 2) What is the average age of your customers? o Between 20 and 40 years old. 3) What kind of customer service policies has the company established towards clients? o With the receipt, we can provide refund or exchange within the 30 days after the purchase (the clothes have to be intact and not worn). The customer can benefit from price adjustment within the 14 days after the purchase. o Some lingerie items are final sales. o All these information are indicated at the cash desk, on the back of the receipt, as well as on the website. 30
  • 31. 4) What kind of customer service policies has the company established towards employees? (Training manuals, standards, mystery shoppers, etc.) o Every sales representative needs to follow a three-hour training program on customer service. o While going up in the company, the management people participate in training sessions on management, and staff management. o We have several handbooks containing the answers to all the questions employees may have. o There are standards to maintain, and to guarantee these standards, we have a lot of evaluations concerning: reach of objectives, action planning, visual presentation, customer service, dress code, loss prevention...5) What kinds of rewards do you give employees who provide extraordinary customer service? o At Jacob, we offer a system of bonuses called the RPM. That is to say, every week and month, there is a minimum sales objective of 90% to reach. If this is the case, the employee will receive an extra amount of money depending on the number of hours worked and the actual percentage of sales any stock associate and visual associate. The way they receive the reward is through attaining a minimum of a 90% weekly sales objective and a minimum of an overall 90% of monthly sales objective. o Every 450 hours worked, the employee who has satisfied all the JACOB norms and objectives will receive a 0.25$ increase in salary.6) What kinds of penalties do you give employees who provide a poor customer service? o If the employee doesnt satisfy the store norms and objectives regarding the customer service, we can provide him/her additional training so that s/he can improve. If it doesn’t change, s/he will not be able to obtain the 0.25$ increase in salary. o On the long term, this could lead to a dismissal because JACOB most valuable discipline is it customer service which is the basis and the main task of the sales representative’s work.7) On a scale from 1 to 10, how do you evaluate your overall customer service and why? Try to be realistic. o I would say 9/10, in principal; if the employees do exactly what they should does (following the handbook to the T and the training). o Actually, generally in the store, I would say 8/10. The service cant be perfect and is not uniform in every branch.8) How do you think you could improve your customer service? o Maybe providing employees more training concerning the products. For instance, training about the lingerie, about the new collections, review of the trends, the materials, the new cuts... 31
  • 32. 9) What percentage of your customers would you say are regular customers? a. Customer that comes in every season? 10% b. Customer that comes every month? 20%10) What do you think constitutes good customer service? o Follow the customers rhythm. o Answer as much as possible to the customers need, so that she enjoys her shopping experience and leaves satisfied and in a good mood. No matter of she bought something or not).11) What do you think your customers expect in terms of good customer service? o If they want service, they will receive service. If they dont want service, they dont receive service. o Be advised by someone who acts fast, smiles, is clear, represents the fashion trends, and most important, who knows his/her product.12) Do you have any system for collecting customer feedback/comments? o On the website, there is a section called « Customer Service » where the customers can write whatever they want on the service they have received.13) Does anything differentiate you from competitors in terms of customer service? o Yes. Today, many large chains such as Zara, H&M... offer almost no service except at the cash desk and at the fitting rooms. We try as much as possible to make our customers involved through contests, updates on the website, videos... 32
  • 33. Appendix
B‐Example
of
the
Onsite‐Questionnaire BOUTIQUE JACOB Inc.- Onsite QuestionnairePART 1-Greeting1. Did you receive a welcome greeting with the 10 seconds you entered the store? YES NO2. Did the sales representative advise you on any current sales promotions in store? YES NO3. Did the sales representative advise you that she was available in case you needed help? YES NOPART 2-Transition4. Did the sales representative greet you? (Not applicable if it is the same person through out the process.) YES NO NOT APPLICABLE5. Did the sale representative offer to help you with your needs? YES NO6. Did the sales representative try to discover your needs? YES NO7. Did the sales representative offer you to collect you items and put them in a fitting room? YES NO8. Did sales representative help you find additional items to complement your current items? (I.e. provide information that certain items come in different colors.) YES NO9. If applicable, did the sale representative offer you to look at another store division? (Jacob Lingerie, Jacob Connexion) YES NO NOT APPLICABLE10. Was the sales representative available when you need extra help or had any questions on the merchandise? YES NO 33
  • 34. PART 3-Fitting Room11. Did the sales representative greet you in the fitting room? (Not applicable if it is the same person through out the process.) YES NO NOT APPLICABLE12. Did the sales representative check up on you, if you needed further help? YES NO13. Did the sale representative help in establish you needs? YES NO14. Did the sales representative offer you her/his opinion on the merchandise you had selected? YES NO15. Did the sales representative offer you other merchandise suggestions or complementary accessories? YES NO16. Did the sales representative compliment you on the merchandise you decided to try on? YES NO17. Was the sales representative willing to explore options to solve any of your problems? YES NO18. If applicable, did the sale representative offer you to look at another store division? (Jacob Lingerie, Jacob Connexion) YES NO NOT APPLICABLEPART 4-Closing/Cash19. Did the sales representative greet you at the Cash counter? (Not applicable if it is the same person threw out the process.) YES NO NOT APPLICABLE20. Did the sales representative speak to you about the Jacob “Ambiance” eau de parfum and candle? YES NO21. Did the sales representative explain the store return and exchange policy? YES NO 34
  • 35. 22. Did the sales representative explain any extra feature of the merchandise you purchase? (i.e. washing instructions, care instructions) YES NO23. Did the sales representative offer you the new JACOB Ecological Bag? YES NO24. Did the sales representative thank you for your purchase and concluded the transaction? YES NOPART 5-Return Transaction25. Did you wait long until someone answered/helped you? YES-How long?_______ NO26. Did the sales representative greet you at the counter? YES NO27. Did the sales representative offer you to help you look for other merchandise possibilities? ( Turning a return into a exchange) YES NO28. Was the sale representative helpful and understandable with you return/exchange? YES NO29. Did the sales representative thank you and wished you a nice day? YES NOPART 6-General Information (Likert Scale)Please rank the following questions as 1-Strongly Disagree and 5-Strongly Agree30. Was the JACOB staff courtesy and professional?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree31. Was the JACOB staff knowledgeable of their products and helpful?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree32. Was the JACOB staff enthusiasm and friendly towards you as a customer?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree33. Was the JACOB store clear and easy to located selected items?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree 35
  • 36. 34. Was the sales representative helpful on the phone?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree35. Did you find you experience shopping at JACOB enjoyable?1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree36. Was the environment suitable to your needs ( i.e. music, placement of ranks, easy to look around)1-Strongly Disagree 2 3-neutral 4 5-Strogly Agree37. Would you consider shopping at JACOB again? If no, please explain why? YES NOExplain:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Store Location:_______________________________________Date of visit:_________________________________________Time of Visit:________________________________________Team member Name:__________________________________

















 36
  • 37. Appendix
C‐Result
of
the
Onsite‐Questionnaire
Survey
Results:

1.

Did
you
receive
a
welcome
greeting
with
the
10
seconds
you
entered
the
store?
75%
YES

2.

Did
the
sales
representative
advise
you
on
any
current
sales
promotions
in
store?
75%
NO

3.

Did
the
sales
representative
advise
you
on
any
current
sales
promotions
in
store?
75%
NO

4.
Did
the
sales
representative
greet
you?
(Not
applicable
if
it
is
the
same
person
throughout
the
process.)
2
NOT
APPLICABLE,
1
YES,
1
NO

5.

Did
the
sale
representative
offer
to
help
you
with
your
needs?
75%
NO

6.
Did
the
sales
representative
try
to
discover
your
needs?
75%
NO
 
7.

Did
the
sales
representative
offer
you
to
collect
you
items
and
put
them
in
a
fitting
room?
75
%
yes

8.
Did
sales
representative
help
you
find
additional
items
to
complement
your
current
items?
(I.e.
provide
information
that
certain
items
come
in
different
colors.)
50
%
yes
and
50%
said
no

9.
 If
 applicable,
 did
 the
 sale
 representative
 offer
 you
 to
 look
 at
 another
 store
 division?
 (Jacob
Lingerie,
Jacob
Connexion)
75
%
yes

10.
Was
the
sales
representative
available
when
you
need
extra
help
or
had
any
questions
on
the
merchandise?
75%
no

11.
 Did
 the
 sales
 representative
 greet
 you
 in
 the
 fitting
 room?
 (Not
 applicable
 if
 it
 is
 the
 same
person
through
out
the
process.)
3
not
applicable
and
1
yes

12.
Did
the
sales
representative
check
up
on
you,
if
you
needed
further
help?
100%
no

13.
Did
the
sale
representative
help
in
establish
you
needs?
100%
no

14.
Did
the
sales
representative
offer
you
her/his
opinion
on
the
merchandise
you
had
selected?
75
%
no
 37
  • 38. 15.
 Did
 the
 sales
 representative
 offer
 you
 other
 merchandise
 suggestions
 or
 complementary
accessories?
50%
yes
and
50
%
no

16.

Did
the
sales
representative
compliment
you
on
the
merchandise
you
decided
to
try
on?
100
%
no

17.
Was
the
sales
representative
willing
to
explore
options
to
solve
any
of
your
problems?
75%
no

18.
 If
 applicable,
 did
 the
 sale
 representative
 offer
 you
 to
 look
 at
 another
 store
 division?
 (Jacob
Lingerie,
Jacob
Connexion)
75%
no

19.
 Did
 the
 sales
 representative
 greet
 you
 at
 the
 Cash
 counter?
 (Not
 applicable
 if
 it
 is
 the
 same
person
threw
out
the
process.)
50
%
no,
1
not
applic.,
and
1
yes

20.
 Did
 the
 sales
 representative
 greet
 you
 at
 the
 Cash
 counter?
 (Not
 applicable
 if
 it
 is
 the
 same
person
threw
out
the
process.)

100%
no

21.
Did
the
sales
representative
explain
the
store
return
and
exchange
policy?
75
%
no

22.
Did
the
sales
representative
explain
the
store
return
and
exchange
policy?
100%
no

23.
Did
the
sales
representative
offer
you
the
new
JACOB
Ecological
Bag?
100
%
no

24.
Did
the
sales
representative
thank
you
for
your
purchase
and
concluded
the
transaction?
100
%
yes

25.
Did
you
wait
long
until
someone
answered/helped
you?
50
%
no,
50%
not
applicable

26.
Did
the
sales
representative
greet
you
at
the
counter?
50
%
yes,
50%
not
applicable.

27.
Did
the
sales
representative
offer
you
to
help
you
look
for
other
merchandise
possibilities?
(
Turning
a
return
into
a
exchange)
50%
no,
50%
not
applicable.


 38
  • 39. 28.

Was
the
sale
representative
helpful
and
understandable
with
you
return/exchange?
1
yes,
1
no,
and
50%
not
applicable

29.
Did
the
sales
representative
thank
you
and
wished
you
a
nice
day?
50%
YES,
50%
NOT
APPLIC.

30.
Was
the
JACOB
staff
courtesy
and
professional?
50%
NEUTRAL,
50%
DISAGREE

31.
Was
the
JACOB
staff
knowledgeable
of
their
products
and
helpful?
50%
NEUTRAL,
50%
DISAGREE

32.
Was
the
JACOB
staff
enthusiasm
and
friendly
towards
you
as
a
customer?
50%
agree,
1
neutral,
1
disagree

33.
Was
the
JACOB
store
clear
and
easy
to
located
selected
items?
75
%
agree,
1
neutral

34.
Was
the
sales
representative
helpful
on
the
phone?
50
%
neutral,
1
agree,
and
Aurore
has
no
answer

35.

Did
you
find
you
experience
shopping
at
JACOB
enjoyable?
75%
strongly
disagree,
1
neutral

36.
 Was
 the
 environment
 suitable
 to
 your
 needs
 (
 i.e.
 music,
 placement
 of
 ranks,
 easy
 to
 look
around)
50
%
agree,
1
strongly
agree,
1
neutral




















 39
  • 40. Appendix
D‐JACOB’s
Six
Core
Competencies
Table 
 40
  • 41. Appendix
E‐JACOB’s
Four
Organizational
Values
 
 41
  • 42. Appendix
F‐Examples
of
STAR
Program
Nomination
Forms
FRONT
 
 
 
 
BACK
 
 42