Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
CTO Playbook
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

CTO Playbook

958

Published on

Tony Parisi's Playbook for Social Gaming Startups

Tony Parisi's Playbook for Social Gaming Startups

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
958
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CTO Playbook2011
    Tony Parisi
    CTO at Large
  • 2. Who I Am
    Entrepreneur
    Consulting Architect and CTO
    Technologist
    Web 3D Inventor and Evangelist
  • 3. What I Do
    Consult
    Advise
    Plan
    Develop
    Manage
    Challenge
    Cajole
    Comfort
    <Stealth
    Mobile
    Gaming
    Startup>
  • 4. What This Is
    Startup Stuff
    Product, Process, People
    Tony’s Tech Toolbox
    What This Is Not
    Gaming Goodies
    Success Secrets
  • 5. Startup Stuff
  • 6. Goals
    Make Great Games
    What are your goals?
    What is the company mission?
    Where do you see yourself and/or the company in X months? Y years?
    Change the World
    $ Cash In $
    Build My Empire
    …prove to my friends I’m not a total loser
  • 7. Strategy
    Pick one and stick to it.
    Your go-to-market plan may be very different from your long term goal.
    Choice of platform may– or may not– be a core strategy decision.
    Focus. You can always expand that focus or PIVOT later.
    Get clarity on this early and often; challenge yourself.
    Some examples
    Launch a killer FB game; expand to mobile later.
    Develop a platform, and find a partner to make a game.
    Raise the bar in game play, and become famous for it.
    Create a money machine: Beg/borrow/steal revenue.
  • 8. Funding
    If you are self-funding, you only have one job (initially): make a great game that generates $.
    Self
    Partners/Customers
    Publishers
    Investors
    Partners, Customers and Publishers have additional requirements (genre, platform etc.) and introduce additional risk.
    Investors invest in team and market opportunity first; technology and game play second.
    Investors invest in platforms, not titles.
    Consumers buy titles, not platforms.
  • 9. Team
    Startups require long hours, huge sacrifice and absolute dedication-- against the odds, during bad times as well as good.
    Your team should be a PACK™
    Lack of alignment will kill a team. It is not a matter of if, but when.
    If your team is not 100% committed, investors and partners will smell it. No part-timers!
    Your livelihood depends on your team creating something new, different and awesome. Your team needs to kick ass.
  • 13. Product, Process, People
  • 14. Product
    • Minimum Viable Product (MVP)
    • 15. Get User/Player Feedback Early and Often
    • 16. Be Thou Data-Driven, Ceaselessly
    • 17. Collect Data From Day One
    Awesome MVP rant on Jon Radoff’s blog
    http://radoff.com/blog/2010/05/04/minimum-viable-product-rant/
  • 18. People
    Process
    Agile (Scrum, Kanban, XP…)
    Everything in broad daylight
    Short release cycles (“sprints”)
    Iterative
    Features can roll out over time
    Inner vs. Outer Methodology
    Design and requirements distinct from project management process
    Continuous Integration
    Integrate daily, automate build/test
    Test-Driven Development
    Ideally, all features are unit-tested before submitted to QA
    Interdisciplinary Teams aka “Pods”
    Nearly all features require multiple disciplines and have many stakeholders
  • 19. Tony’s Tech Toolbox
  • 20. Platforms: An Omnivore’s Dilemma
    A Tyranny of Choice for Client and Server
    HTML5/Flash/WebGL/Molehill War
    Android/iOS/Windows Phone/Playbook War
    LAMP is Rapidly Fragmenting/Dissolving
    Server Frameworks, Client SDKs are a Double-Edged Sword
  • 21. Design for Scalability
    Players
    LoadBalancer
    Application servers scale horizontally to user connections
    Shared-Nothing Architectures
    Asynchronous/Event-Based Where Possible
    Horizontal Scaling with Cheap, Disposable, Replicable Parts
    Cloud Hosting/Virtualization
    Edge Networks for Assets
    Build Cheap at First, But Design for Big From the Start
    Separate Your Log Server from Prod
    Build Analytics in At The Start!
    Application Server
    Application Server
    memcache
    memcache
    Object DB
    Inventory DB
    Inventory DB
    Object DB
    Inventory replicated across application instances
    UserDB
    User DB
    Object DB scales horizontally to repository growth
    User DB scales horizontally to user growth
    Log DB
    Metrics and reporting offline from production
  • 22. Tony’s Toolbox
    Cheap Cloud Hosting
    Linode
    Cheap/Free Project Management
    Rally Community, Pivotal Tracker
    Cheap Corporate Docs/Mail
    Google
    Cheap/Free Sharing
    Dropbox, Evernote
    Content Management
    Tactic (not hosted, costs $)
    Client Code
    All depends
    Use as much HTML, GL, SVG etc. as possible
    Server Code
    PHP, Node.js
    Database
    CouchBase
    Revision Control
    SVN or GIT
    Frameworks
    Home grown
    “I love frameworks… as long as they’re mine.”
  • 23. CTO Playbook2011
    Tony Parisi
    CTO at Large

×