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Predicting
Strategy
in
which
readers
use
information from a text (including
titles,
headings,
pictures,
and
diagrams) and ...
Importance
 Helps students to ask questions while they are

reading
 Encourages students to skim or re-read portions of
...
Process
1. Supply

students
with
a
predictions
worksheet while reading
Create a simple worksheet by dividing a piece of pa...
3. Ask

students to list as many possible
outcomes of a story as they can think of.

Read a portion of a story and ask the...
5. Remind students to always look for the

basics of a story: Who, What, Where, When,
Why and How.
This information will h...
7. For

non-fiction reading, help students
identify the main topic sentence.
Once students can quickly identify the main i...
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Predicting

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Predicting

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Transcript of "Predicting"

  1. 1. Predicting Strategy in which readers use information from a text (including titles, headings, pictures, and diagrams) and their own personal experiences to anticipate what they are about to read (or what comes next).
  2. 2. Importance  Helps students to ask questions while they are reading  Encourages students to skim or re-read portions of the story to better understand it or to recall facts about the characters or events  Provides a way for students to monitor their understanding of the material  Ss will more fully comprehend what they have read and will retain the information for longer periods of time.
  3. 3. Process 1. Supply students with a predictions worksheet while reading Create a simple worksheet by dividing a piece of paper in half, long ways, and writing "Prediction" on the left hand half and "Evidence" on the right hand half. 2. Have students review the front and back of a book, the table of contents, the chapter names, subheadings and diagrams in a book prior to reading.
  4. 4. 3. Ask students to list as many possible outcomes of a story as they can think of. Read a portion of a story and ask the class to think about different ways the story might turn out. List all the ideas on the board and review again after reading the rest of the story. 4. Have students go on a treasure hunt in a story. Thinking about the clues the author gives about how the story will end.
  5. 5. 5. Remind students to always look for the basics of a story: Who, What, Where, When, Why and How. This information will help them separate the important and nonessential information in the story so they can guess what will happen next. 6. For younger children, go through the book, looking at and discussing the pictures before reading. Ask the students what they think is happening in the story. Then read the story to see how well they guessed.
  6. 6. 7. For non-fiction reading, help students identify the main topic sentence. Once students can quickly identify the main idea, they can make predictions about how the rest of the paragraph or section will provide information to back up this sentence. 8. Make inferences To accurately make predictions students must understand not only what the author said, but what the author is implying. 9. Read a story, stopping before reaching the ending. Have each student write their own ending to the story.
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