• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Agenda for Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, May 27, 2010
 

Agenda for Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, May 27, 2010

on

  • 607 views

Agenda for the Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, held at the Association for Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), May 27, 2010. This meeting was jointly organized by ...

Agenda for the Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, held at the Association for Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), May 27, 2010. This meeting was jointly organized by APLU and George Mason University with support from the Kauffman Foundation.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
607
Views on SlideShare
605
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

https://twitter.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Agenda for Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, May 27, 2010 Agenda for Presidents’ Symposium on The Future of Collegiate Education, May 27, 2010 Document Transcript

    • Presidents’ Symposium onThe Future ofCollegiate EducationDate/TimeMay 27, 20102:00-8:30 p.m.Location2:00-6:10 Leadership Workshop (agenda below) Association of Public and Land-grant Universities 1307 New York Avenue, NW Washington, DC 200056:30-8:30 Reception and Dinner The Willard Hotel 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, D.C. 20004 (Shuttle service will be available from APLU to the Willard.)With support from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
    • Presidents’ Symposium onThe Future of Collegiate EducationAgenda2:00-2:10 Welcome Alan Merten, President, George Mason University Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities2:10-2:40 Panel 1. The Market Landscape—From Budgetary Challenges to New Business ModelsWith state budgets likely to remain under strain for some time, public universities around thecountry have been seeking ways to reduce costs without reducing educational quality oravailability. The greatest challenges faced in coming years by traditional four-year colleges maywell turn out to come not from budgetary pressures but rather from innovative, low-costbusiness models for collegiate education currently under development. Such alternative modelsare likely to become increasingly competitive as global business seeks demonstrated competenciesover credentials and students are decreasingly able to finance a traditional four-year collegeeducation. The first panel of the symposium will explore these trends.Moderator: Philip Auerswald, Associate Professor, School of Public Policy, George Mason UniversityPanelist: Amy Bernstein, VP of Thought Leadership, Manpower Inc.Panelist: Anya Kamenetz, author DIY UCommentary: Angel Cabrera, President, Thunderbird School of Global Management2:40-3:00 Discussion3:00-3:30 Panel 2. Learning by Design—Technology and the ClassroomFor decades, colleges have depended on revenues from a small number of large lecture courses tooffer the large number of low-enrollment electives that represent the full richness of universityeducation. The structure of large lecture courses has evolved subject to budgetary realities. In thepast decade, new technologies have opened up new instructional possibilities. In some leadinguniversities self-paced learning, peer-mentoring, and automated assessment combine in low-cost,highly effective models of instruction for core content. Elsewhere, universities are pioneeringcollaborative classrooms and problem-based learning environments that increase the relevance ofeducational experiences. This panel will consider the full range of transformations to collegeclassrooms currently being affected by technological innovation and the near-term actions theysuggest for leaders of public universities.Moderator: James H. Turner Jr., Association of Public and Land-grant UniversitiesPanelist: Burck Smith, founder and CEO, Straighterline Inc.Panelist: Roy Swift, Director, Certificate Accreditation Program, American National Standards InstituteCommentary: Luis Proenza, President, University of Akron3:30-3:50 Discussion3:50-4:10 Break4:10-4:40 Panel 3. Opensource Education—Course Content, Learning Networks, and EvaluationWhile the impact of technology on pedagogy in the classroom—as discussed in panel 2—isdramatic, the greatest impacts of technology on collegiate education extend beyond theclassroom and the campus. Open access knowledge and shared databases of instructional
    • Presidents’ Symposium onThe Future of Collegiate Educationmaterials have already made home-schooling an increasingly plausible alternative for parents ofchildren in at the K-12 level. Even “do-it-yourself” collegiate education, as described by authorAnya Kamenetz, is a newly conceivable possibility. Other new possibilities are being created bythe connection technology allows among students, between campuses, and across the boundarieshave long separated universities from broader society. This panel will discuss the new possibilitiesfor course content, learning networks, and evaluation created in the open-source education stenvironment of the 21 century.Moderator: Elliot Maxwell, author and lecturerPanelist: Cecilia dOliveira, Executive Director, MIT OpenCourseWarePanelist: Michael Edson, Director of Web and New Media Strategy, The Smithsonian InstitutionCommentary: Michelle Fox, U.S. Department of Energy4:40-5:00 Discussion5:00-5:30 Panel 4. Creating Social Value—Entrepreneurship and Societal EngagementAs institutions of higher learning experience the same process of “unbundling” to which otherindustries have been subject over recent decades, those forms of instruction least amenable toautomated assessment will be of increasing importance to universities. Among these, theproblem-oriented practice of entrepreneurship may be of particular significance. This is in partbecause students entering a rapidly changing world of work will increasingly demand the abilityto be job-makers, not just job seekers. At the same time, universities may find their own successto be increasingly dependent on effective strategies of engagement with the local communitiesand regional ecosystems of innovation within which they are situated. This session will exploreinnovations in placing entrepreneurship and societal engagement at the heart of the collegiateexperience.Moderator: Melissa Carrier, Executive Director, University of MarylandPanelist: William Green, Vice Provost, University of MiamiPanelist: Erin Krampetz, Business and Program Development Manager, AshokaUCommentary: George Mehaffy, Vice President for Academic Leadership and Change, AASCU5:30-5:50 Discussion5:50-6:10 Closing Discussion Among University PresidentsModerator: Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities Alan Merten, President, George Mason University Luis Proenza, President, University of Akron Angel Cabrera, President, Thunderbird University6:10-6:30 Break/Change Venue (Shuttle service will be available from APLU to the Willard.)6:30-8:30 Reception and Dinner—Willard Hotel Welcome Alan Merten, President, George Mason University
    • Presidents’ Symposium onThe Future of Collegiate Education Introduction of Keynote Speaker Philip Auerswald, Associate Professor, School of Public Policy, George Mason University Dinner Keynote Address Thomas Kalil, Deputy Director for Policy for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Senior Advisor for Science, Technology and Innovation for the National Economic Council Concluding Remarks Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities Note: The number of participants at dinner at is limited. We will allocate available places as we receive registrations.