CH Neighborhood Watch Training #2
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Cottonwood Heights Neighborhood Watch Training Presentation #1

Cottonwood Heights Neighborhood Watch Training Presentation #1

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  • Teaching Point: Let group know that this is the first of two training meetings for the Neighborhood Watch Program.
  • Teaching Points: List of items that will be discussed. Items covered will help give the public some information as to what they can do the help the officers. How you the citizens can help.
  • Teaching Points: What exactly is Neighborhood Watch. How does the program work in West Jordan.
  • Teaching Points: Just like in the good old days when neighbors helped neighbors, and they knew who there neighbors were. Be willing to help each other by keep an eye out for each others property. Example: The neighbor that called the police when her neighbors house was broken into.
  • Teaching Points: Crime Prevention at it’s best. It really does work. Locks & Hardware: Crime Prevention is learning techniques the will help not only in your neighborhood but in everyday live. How best to work with the Police Department, knowing who to call in the city to get results.
  • Teaching Points: Awareness: This takes practice. Not something we are born with. We will help provide training. Community Involvement: Then it’s a matter of becoming involved & informed about what is happening around you.
  • Teaching Points: These are the three elements that have to be present to have a crime committed. We all have the ability, hopefully none of us have the desire. Opportunity is the one thing that WE have control over, i.e. locking car doors, getting everything out of vehicles, not leaving keys in vehicles.
  • Teaching Points: Being the eyes & ears for the police department. Not becoming the vigilantes but being willing to report what it is you see and hear. Getting involved, but being an ALIVE witness.
  • Teaching Points: Is neighborhood watch just the coordinators responsibly? It’s everyone’s. Here are a few ways you can help improve your own neighborhood.
  • Teaching Points: Coordinator, kid-of-like the ring-leader of the neighborhood. These are some of their responsibilities.
  • Teaching Points: Block Captains and their responsibilities. Persons who help the coordinator, break-up the coordinators responsibilities.
  • Teaching Points: Being able to communicate to dispatch what it is you are seeing is very important. What and how you articulate my depend on response by officers. Dispatch job is to try and assess the situation.
  • Teaching Points: Persons running in the middle of the day in jogging outfit? Suspicious. How about if it’s this bad guy? Someone you don’t know in the neighborhood. Going door to door, they need solicitors license. Call when you witness something occurring.
  • Teaching Points: Most people can tell the difference between kids playing, someone yelling etc. But what if the noise’s occur late at night. How about breaking glass, or a pounding noise in the middle of the night. Being aware and being able to determine the difference,listening to the feeling you get when something is wrong.
  • Teaching Points: Short stay traffic, items being sold from cars or persons. Likely stolen property or involve the selling of drugs.
  • Teaching Points: Most of us can tell is someone has forgotten to turn on their headlights, not suppose to drive without headlights. What about a vehicle that shows up in the neighborhood and it doesn’t belong to anyone you know? Please call. If the vehicles are abandoned in the neighborhoods. Criminals commit crimes in other areas the drop off stolen vehicles in your neighborhood. If no one calls then they are long gone.
  • Teaching Points: This is Sheila and I carrying property on foot at an unusual hour. Most people move during the daylight hours. Story about the neighbor that watched new neighbors move in then others pull up at take what had just been moved in. Wrote down plate. Being aware. Now if your neighbors are on vacation, be willing to keep and eye on the property. Stop paper deliver, mail deliver, install light timers so the lights go on and off while you are away. Have a neighbor park one of their cars in your driveway. Tell only those you TRUST!
  • Teaching Points: New dispatch number. Where is dispatch/VECC located. Service eight other agencies. Give North, South, East, West coordinates. When you have a question, PLEASE do not approach the officers while they are gathering information, but be willing to give information when asked or approached by the officers. Officer safety is their biggest concern. Don’t know who the good guys and bad guys are. Other information will help us look up a call if you have any questions about something that may have taken place in your neighborhood.

CH Neighborhood Watch Training #2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Neighborhood Watch #1
  • 2. BAD PART OF TOWN
  • 3. TOPICS TO BE COVERED…
    • What is Neighborhood Watch.
    • Elements of Crime.
    • Factors of a Crime.
    • Neighbors become the Eyes and Ears.
    • Neighborhood Watch is Everyone’s Responsibility .
  • 4. TOPICS CONT….
    • Coordinators’ Responsibilities.
    • Block Captain Responsibilities.
    • How to report what is Suspicious – Calling dispatch.
    • How to describe a person.
    • How to describe a vehicle.
    • How & Who to call.
  • 5. What is Neighborhood Watch?
  • 6. NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS
    • Working together to make your neighborhood a better place to work and live.
  • 7.
    • Crime prevention at its best.
    • It’s more than locks and hardware.
    • It is your Police Department working in partnership with citizens.
    NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH IS?
  • 8. KEY ELEMENTS FOR AN EFFECTIVE NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH
    • Awareness
    • Community Involvement
  • 9. FACTORS OF A CRIME
    • Ability
    • Desire
    • Opportunity
    Remove the opportunity and prevent the crime.
  • 10. NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH SIGNS
    • Signs are a crime deterrent.
    • Remind residents that they are part of a Neighborhood Watch program.
    • Will it keep bad guys out of your neighborhood? Not unless you follow through.
    • Neighborhood Watch is everyone's responsibility.
  • 11. NEIGHBORS ARE THE EYES & EARS
    • This Means: Reporting what you see and hear to the Police.
  • 12. NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY
    • Become acquainted with your surrounding neighbors.
    • Learn & Incorporate Crime Prevention Techniques.
    • Report suspicious and criminal activities to the Police.
  • 13. NEIGHBORHOOD COORDINATOR
    • Provides Leadership
    • Selects Block Captains
    • Serves as a communication link between block captains & police
    • Maintains Records and Neighborhood Watch Map.
    • Distributes Information
    • Attends quarterly training
    • Organizes Neighborhood Parties
    • Develops a phone tree and activates when necessary .
  • 14. PHONE TREE Coordinator’s List
  • 15. BLOCK CAPTAIN
    • Is someone who:
    • Is concerned about the Neighborhood.
    • Is willing to knock on doors to meet neighbors.
    • Brings neighbors together to solve problems.
    • Informs neighbors about special programs and activities.
    • Establishes procedures to discourage crime.
    • Meets together with neighbors as often as necessary.
  • 16. WHAT IS SUSPICIOUS AND SHOULD BE REPORTED
    • BEING ABLE TO COMMUNICATE TO DISPATCH WHAT YOU SEE.
  • 17. IS THIS SUSPICIOUS ?
    • It is important that you are able to tell the dispatcher why what you are calling about is suspicious. Time of day may be a factor. Just because someone is different does not mean they are suspicious. Behavior is the key.
    • A stranger running from a home or car.
    • A person going door to door, looking into windows & parked cars.
    • A person who seems to have no purpose wandering in the neighborhood.
  • 18. UNUSUAL NOISES
    • Someone screaming and you are unable to determine the reason. There is a difference between a scream of desperation and the screams of children playing.
    • Unusual or suspicious noise, such as breaking glass or pounding.
  • 19. BUSINESS TRANSACTION
    • Business transactions conducted from a vehicle. Could involve the sale of drugs or stolen goods.
    • Offers of merchandise at ridiculously low prices. Probably stolen.
  • 20. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLES
    • Vehicle moving slowly, without lights, or with no apparent destination.
    • A strange van or abandoned vehicle parked in a neighborhood.
  • 21. SUSPICIOUS PERSONS
    • Property being carried by persons on foot at an unusual hour.
    • Property being removed from a closed business or residence known to be unoccupied.
    • A stranger in a car stopping to beacon a child.
    • Child resisting the advances of an adult known not to be the parent.
  • 22. Don’t take matters into your own hands.
  • 23.
    • • LIFE THREATENING EMERGENCIES: 911
    • • ALL OTHER POLICE AND FIRE RESPONSE:
    • 801-840-4000
    • This is the dispatch number to report non-emergency situations
    • (VECC ADDRESS: 5360 West South Ridge Village Drive Approx. 5400 South )
    • To follow up on a previous call, we need as much of the following information as possible: Date, Time, Location, Nature of the Call, Case Number, Phone number the call was made from, Any other information.
    • 801-944-7100
    HOW AND WHO TO CALL
  • 24. THIS IS HOW TO DESCRIBE A PERSON
    • Sex: Male or Female
    • Age: Judge by someone you know
    • Weight: Judge by someone you know
    • Shirt or Coat: Color, Style, Etc.
    • Approximate Height
    • Hat or No hat
    • Hair Color: Also if balding or thinning
    • Eye Color
    • Pants: Color, Levis, Dress, etc.
    • Shoes or Boots: Style
    • Any outstanding features: Speech, limp, missing teeth, tattoos
  • 25. THIS IS HOW TO DESCRIBE A VEHICLE
    • License number and state if visible
    • Color
    • Make
    • Year
    • Body Style
    • Model
    • Antenna
    • Accessories
    • Unique Sounds
    • Unique Designs
    • Body Damage
  • 26.
    • A Stranger running from a car or home.
    • Someone screaming and you are unable to determine the reason.
    • A person who seems to have no purpose wandering in the neighborhood.
    • Unusual or suspicious noise, such as breaking glass or pounding.
    • Vehicles moving slowly, without lights, or with no apparent destination.
    • Business transactions conducted from a vehicle. Could involve the sale of drugs or stolen goods.
    • Offers of merchandise at ridiculously low prices. They are probably stolen.
    • Property carried by persons on foot at an unusual hour.
    • Property being removed from a closed business or residence known to be unoccupied.
    • A stranger in a car stopping to beckon to a child, or a child resisting the advances of an adult.
    • A strange van or abandoned vehicle parked in a neighborhood.
    What is Suspicious & Should be Reported