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Communicate With ConfidenceNDLA 2012 ConferenceFriday, September 2012Presented by:Aubrey Madler,Marlene Anderson, andWendy...
Know your....1.Room and Equipment2.Audience3.Topic and Material4.Yourself5.Expectations6.Timeline
FillersGrammar
1. Listen2. Pause3. Confirm4. Tell5. End
Elaborate on closed-ended questionsOREO
Communicate with confidence:The Elevator speech2012 NDLA ConferencePrepared by Marlene AndersonMackay’s moral:A great elev...
Elevator Speech - definedAn elevator speech is a brief presentation that introduces aproduct, service, philosophy, or an i...
Elevator Speech Characteristics• Can be formal or informal• Typical length is 2-3 minutes• Clear, brief message with inten...
Define your intention:what do you want to happen?– Set your goals and objectives– Know your audience– Determine what kind ...
What kind of speech best fits your intention?– Impromptu – A “thinking on your feet” kind of speech delivered offthe top o...
Elevator SpeechShort Outline Form (4 x 6 card)• I. INTRODUCTION• • Grab the listener’s attention.............................
Making Your Speech Great:Three Benchmarks• Case – Build a solid, persuasive case using clean, logicalarguments and support...
Building a Case: What Works• Build your case so others see what you want as necessary andvital to their goals, needs, and ...
Get creative!• Use anecdotes, stories, and humor• Make the English language work for you. Use interestingwords and phrases...
Delivery• Energy and enthusiasm are key … have fun• Bring your personality into play• Find the right words; make sure you ...
Summing up: Ten Basic Steps• Define your intention• Decide what kind of presentation to use• Draft your core outline• Buil...
Suggested Resources• "Elevator Speeches: Whats So Important about Them?." Children & Libraries: The Journal OfThe Associat...
Working with the MediaOr…Don’t Let This Happen to You!Presented by Wendy WendtDirector, Grand Forks Public LibraryWendy.We...
What happened to me…
First, ask questions!• What is the subject of the interview?• Am I the appropriate person to answer questions about thetop...
Know Your Key Message• Know the key message you want to deliver• Deliver the message at the first opportunity and aim to r...
It’s What You Say ...• Don’t lie or bend the truth – ever! You can skirt a sensitivequestion but don’t lie.• Never repeat ...
…And How You Say It!• Be courteous and friendly.• Keep your answers short and punchy (provide sound bites). Developthem fo...
Off the Record• THERE IS NO SUCH THING!!!• Be careful what you say and remember that everything yousay can be used.• Don’t...
They Got It Wrong!!!• Don’t ask to see the story before it goes to press. They won’teven if they say they will.• Don’t los...
Build Relationships• Introduce yourself to your local media outlets (newspapermanaging editor, radio and television commun...
Communicate with confidence
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Communicate with confidence

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Slides 1-6 are mine, the remaining belong to my co-presenters. This was very well received at the 2012 NDLA conference--great topic.

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  • Q: Isn’t it true that librarians allow children to get pornography on the Internet?A: Absolutely not. Our role is to help children learn to use the Internet wisely and to help guide them to all the great sites that are out there.
  • Transcript of "Communicate with confidence"

    1. 1. Communicate With ConfidenceNDLA 2012 ConferenceFriday, September 2012Presented by:Aubrey Madler,Marlene Anderson, andWendy Wendt
    2. 2. Know your....1.Room and Equipment2.Audience3.Topic and Material4.Yourself5.Expectations6.Timeline
    3. 3. FillersGrammar
    4. 4. 1. Listen2. Pause3. Confirm4. Tell5. End
    5. 5. Elaborate on closed-ended questionsOREO
    6. 6. Communicate with confidence:The Elevator speech2012 NDLA ConferencePrepared by Marlene AndersonMackay’s moral:A great elevator speech strategycan take you all the way to the top
    7. 7. Elevator Speech - definedAn elevator speech is a brief presentation that introduces aproduct, service, philosophy, or an idea. The name suggests thenotion that the message should be delivered in the time span ofan elevator ride, up to about three minutes. Its general purposeis to intrigue and inspire a listener to want to hear more of thepresenter’s complete proposition in the near future.-- Terry L. SjodinSmall Message, Big Impact: The Elevator Speech Effect
    8. 8. Elevator Speech Characteristics• Can be formal or informal• Typical length is 2-3 minutes• Clear, brief message with intention• Has a structure with an opening, body and close• Sole function is to intrigue a listener and get his/her interest,plus the chance to offer a longer, more detailed presentationat a later time• May initiate a sequence of events that result in opportunities,large and small, far into the future
    9. 9. Define your intention:what do you want to happen?– Set your goals and objectives– Know your audience– Determine what kind of presentation to use:• Informative – objective and unbiased in nature; meant to promotelearning• Ceremonial – appeals to the values of a group; appropriate for socialgatherings, celebrations, and memorials• Persuasive – has a specific intent; provides a choice; meant to get thelistener to take some kind of action– Be ready to deliver your message whenever the opportunity arises– Think about the best way to close your speech– Read a situation when you’re in it; be prepared to adjust
    10. 10. What kind of speech best fits your intention?– Impromptu – A “thinking on your feet” kind of speech delivered offthe top of your head, using a mental outline. Provides great freedomfor interaction.– Extemporaneous - Given in a conversational style, but prepared inadvance and delivered using an outline to stay on track.– Manuscript – Used when a presentation needs to be written. It ispresented word for word and read verbatim.– Memorized – The manuscript speech committed to memory. Itrequires practice to deliver effectively.
    11. 11. Elevator SpeechShort Outline Form (4 x 6 card)• I. INTRODUCTION• • Grab the listener’s attention..............................................................• • Tell them where you are going................................................................• II. BODY• • Talking point #1...................................................................................• • Talking point #2.................................................................................• • Talking point #3..................................................................................• III. CONCLUSION• • Wrap up. (Allude to a couple of strong points you wish to discuss in detail if givenadditional time.)• ...........................................................................................................• IV. CLOSE: CALL TO ACTION• • Ask for an appointment time to give them a longer, more in-depth presentation.• ...........................................................................................................Available for free download at www.smallmessagebigimpact.com
    12. 12. Making Your Speech Great:Three Benchmarks• Case – Build a solid, persuasive case using clean, logicalarguments and supporting evidence• Creativity – Bring your message to life! Pepper your speechwith creative, thought-provoking, and intriguing information,stories, and use of language• Delivery – Present your message in your own authentic voice
    13. 13. Building a Case: What Works• Build your case so others see what you want as necessary andvital to their goals, needs, and interests• Consider the kinds of things decision-makers need to know– How will you save them time– How will you save them money– How will you make things easier/better– How will you provide solutions to problems– How will you ease their stress– How will you show them that you are reliable and dependable– How will you help them have fun
    14. 14. Get creative!• Use anecdotes, stories, and humor• Make the English language work for you. Use interestingwords and phrases and rhetorical devices like alliteration andmetaphor• Craft a clever opening• Craft a closing that will take you to the next step (a chance togive a more detailed presentation at another time)
    15. 15. Delivery• Energy and enthusiasm are key … have fun• Bring your personality into play• Find the right words; make sure you pronounce and use themcorrectly• Use gestures and vocal variety• Let the power of the pause work for you• Time your speech• Practice, practice, practice• Ask others for feedback
    16. 16. Summing up: Ten Basic Steps• Define your intention• Decide what kind of presentation to use• Draft your core outline• Build your case• Remember to decide how to close your speech• Write it out• Get creative• Speak in your own authentic voice• Practice, practice, practice• Get started … use it!
    17. 17. Suggested Resources• "Elevator Speeches: Whats So Important about Them?." Children & Libraries: The Journal OfThe Association For Library Service To Children 6, no. 2 (Summer2008 2008): 52-54. EBSCOMegaFILE, EBSCOhost (accessed September 13, 2012).• Fontichiaro, Kristin, and Marcia Mardis. "How Does a Culture mean?." Knowledge Quest 37,no. 5 (May 2009): 98-101. EBSCO MegaFILE, EBSCOhost (accessed September 13, 2012).• "Sample Elevator Speech:." Knowledge Quest 37, no. 5 (May 2009): 100-101. EBSCOMegaFILE, EBSCOhost (accessed September 13, 2012).• Sjodin, Terri L. Small Message, Big Impact: the Elevator Speech Effect. Rev. ed. New York :Portfolio/Penguin, 2012.• Sjodin Communications (www.sjodincommunications.com/)• Toastmasters International (www.toastmasters.org)
    18. 18. Working with the MediaOr…Don’t Let This Happen to You!Presented by Wendy WendtDirector, Grand Forks Public LibraryWendy.Wendt@GFLibrary.com
    19. 19. What happened to me…
    20. 20. First, ask questions!• What is the subject of the interview?• Am I the appropriate person to answer questions about thetopic?• Who is the reporter and where does he/she work?• What will be the format of the interview? Live? Taped?Telephone? Is it a feature story, or a news story?• Where will the interview be conducted and how long will theinterview be?• What is the reporter’s deadline?
    21. 21. Know Your Key Message• Know the key message you want to deliver• Deliver the message at the first opportunity and aim to repeatit at least twice• Be prepared – know the facts! Who-What-Where-When-Why-How• Before the interview, try to think of some difficult questionsthat might be asked and know how you’d respond• “Bridge” challenging questions over to the message you wantto deliver• Provide background information and materials
    22. 22. It’s What You Say ...• Don’t lie or bend the truth – ever! You can skirt a sensitivequestion but don’t lie.• Never repeat a negative.• Tell only what you want the interviewer to know.• Never say “No comment.” There’s always something lessevasive you can say.• Say “I don’t know” if you don’t. Then get the answer to thereporter asap.• Say, “The most important thing is…”and repeat your keymessage.
    23. 23. …And How You Say It!• Be courteous and friendly.• Keep your answers short and punchy (provide sound bites). Developthem for key points prior to the interview and write on an indexcard• Talk – don’t speak. You’re talking to regular people.• Pause before answering questions to think about how best to saywhat you want to say. Don’t rush into an answer.• Don’t fill in silent pauses. Say what you have to say and STOP!• Be sincere about how you feel. If it upsets you or you feel happyabout it or you’re frustrated, you can say that.• Paint a picture – use anecdotes and stories when possible• Stay calm! Smile! Relax!
    24. 24. Off the Record• THERE IS NO SUCH THING!!!• Be careful what you say and remember that everything yousay can be used.• Don’t say anything you don’t want printed, heard or seen.• Never answer a question you don’t understand. Ask forclarification.• Don’t speculate or talk about anything outside your expertise.• Remember, just because a question is asked, that doesn’tmean you have to answer it. Use the bridge!
    25. 25. They Got It Wrong!!!• Don’t ask to see the story before it goes to press. They won’teven if they say they will.• Don’t lose your cool if the media make an error in your story.If it’s not really significant, forget it.• If it’s a major error, politely point it out to the reporter andrequest a clarification.• Remember, if you overreact, you could damage yourrelationship with that media outlet permanently
    26. 26. Build Relationships• Introduce yourself to your local media outlets (newspapermanaging editor, radio and television community director, etc)and find out how best to contact them.• Send occasional story ideas and PSA’s about library programsand events to your media contacts.• Develop guest column or program, if possible.• Respond promptly to all media requests.• Give the media what they want – facts and a good quote.• Say “Thank you!”
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