Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities: A progress report

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Jack Geller presents his research on broadband adoption in MN to the Blandin Broadband Strategy Board

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Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities: A progress report

  1. 1. Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities:A Progress Report on BroadbandJack M. Geller, Ph.D.University of Minnesota-Crookston Blandin Foundation Strategy Board August 31, 2010<br /> * Funding supported through Blandin Foundation Grant No. U20010-001<br />** Data collected by the Center for Rural Policy & Development, St. Peter, MN<br />
  2. 2. Study Methodology<br /><ul><li>Sampling: Stratified sample based upon rurality
  3. 3. Sample size = 911
  4. 4. Statistical Margin of Error : + 4%
  5. 5. Data collected between May 2010 – July 2010</li></ul> ** Data collected by the Center for Rural Policy &<br /> Development and provided under agreement with the<br /> MIRC project<br />
  6. 6. The Technology Adoption Curve<br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Number of Broadband Providers in your Area<br />
  9. 9. Internet Connection Type<br />
  10. 10. Why Dial-up Users have not Switched<br />
  11. 11. Utilization & Costs<br /><ul><li> Median hours online per week: 10 hours
  12. 12. Satisfied with connection speed: 81.9%
  13. 13. Median price per month: $35.00
  14. 14. Median Total Communication Bill: $100 -$150</li></li></ul><li>Computer & Internet Connectivity by Age<br />
  15. 15. Computer & Internet Connectivity by Income<br />
  16. 16. Observations<br />Broadband is now the predominant method by which rural residents connect to the Internet.<br />In 2001 6% of all rural Minnesota households had a broadband connection; but in 2010 only 6% still have a dial-up connection.<br />Broadband access, while not yet ubiquitous in rural Minnesota is overwhelmingly accessible. <br />Competition is limited, but increasing in may areas.<br />Stagnant growth in home computers will create a “ceiling” on broadband growth. <br />The most cited reason why dial-up customers have not yet adopted broadband services is still price.<br />
  17. 17. Observations<br />The socio-economic and demographic characteristics of rural Minnesota are greater barriers to the full adoption of broadband technology than geography or topography.<br />The challenge to full adoption will lie in the development of broadband applications that are specifically relevant and valued among those remaining “laggards.”<br />
  18. 18. For Additional Information Contact<br />Jack M. Geller, Ph.D.<br />University of Minnesota, Crookston<br />218-281-8248<br />gelle045@umn.edu <br />

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