Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities: A progress report
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Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities: A progress report

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Jack Geller presents his research on broadband adoption in MN to the Blandin Broadband Strategy Board

Jack Geller presents his research on broadband adoption in MN to the Blandin Broadband Strategy Board

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  • 1. Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities:A Progress Report on BroadbandJack M. Geller, Ph.D.University of Minnesota-Crookston Blandin Foundation Strategy Board August 31, 2010
    * Funding supported through Blandin Foundation Grant No. U20010-001
    ** Data collected by the Center for Rural Policy & Development, St. Peter, MN
  • 2. Study Methodology
    • Sampling: Stratified sample based upon rurality
    • 3. Sample size = 911
    • 4. Statistical Margin of Error : + 4%
    • 5. Data collected between May 2010 – July 2010
    ** Data collected by the Center for Rural Policy &
    Development and provided under agreement with the
    MIRC project
  • 6. The Technology Adoption Curve
  • 7.
  • 8. Number of Broadband Providers in your Area
  • 9. Internet Connection Type
  • 10. Why Dial-up Users have not Switched
  • 11. Utilization & Costs
    • Median hours online per week: 10 hours
    • 12. Satisfied with connection speed: 81.9%
    • 13. Median price per month: $35.00
    • 14. Median Total Communication Bill: $100 -$150
  • Computer & Internet Connectivity by Age
  • 15. Computer & Internet Connectivity by Income
  • 16. Observations
    Broadband is now the predominant method by which rural residents connect to the Internet.
    In 2001 6% of all rural Minnesota households had a broadband connection; but in 2010 only 6% still have a dial-up connection.
    Broadband access, while not yet ubiquitous in rural Minnesota is overwhelmingly accessible.
    Competition is limited, but increasing in may areas.
    Stagnant growth in home computers will create a “ceiling” on broadband growth.
    The most cited reason why dial-up customers have not yet adopted broadband services is still price.
  • 17. Observations
    The socio-economic and demographic characteristics of rural Minnesota are greater barriers to the full adoption of broadband technology than geography or topography.
    The challenge to full adoption will lie in the development of broadband applications that are specifically relevant and valued among those remaining “laggards.”
  • 18. For Additional Information Contact
    Jack M. Geller, Ph.D.
    University of Minnesota, Crookston
    218-281-8248
    gelle045@umn.edu