Teachers mentoring teachers: A process of reflection and rejuvenation Dr Denise Beutel & Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane, Queensla...
Context  <ul><li>Beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Expected to take on the same responsibilities as more ex...
Mentoring <ul><li>Widely used strategy for providing guidance and support for beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Many me...
Aims of the paper  <ul><ul><li>to report on the planning and  implementation of a mentoring program designed to develop me...
Mentor training <ul><li>From providing emotional support  assisting beginning teachers through dialogue and reflection </l...
<ul><li>Mentoring program content </li></ul><ul><li>Module 1. Mentoring and the mentoring role </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What ...
Mentor training program <ul><li>Participants  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>8 teachers commenced the program but only 4 completed ...
Data collection and analysis <ul><li>Interpretative study using qualitative data </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection  </li><...
Results and discussion  <ul><ul><li>Mentors still perceived themselves as experts (transmission mode evident) </li></ul></...
Results and Discussion (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Mentoring viewed as something done  to  mentees (rather than  with  them) </li>...
Results and discussion (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Mentoring focused on providing emotional support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ W...
Stages of the mentoring process Third Stage- Peer support  &  collegial relationship (Delegate) Second Stage- Mentee more ...
Discussion <ul><li>While mentor program seemed to help mentors to support mentees, it did not appear to promote deep refle...
Where to from here? <ul><li>Revise mentoring program </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greater focus on developing mentors as coll...
Revised mentoring program-proposed content <ul><li>Module 1. Mentoring and the mentoring role   </li></ul><ul><li>What is ...
Conclusion <ul><li>The development of reflective practices should form an integral component of mentoring programs. For it...
Contact details <ul><li>Dr Denise Beutel </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane </li>...
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    1. 1. Teachers mentoring teachers: A process of reflection and rejuvenation Dr Denise Beutel & Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane, Queensland University of Technology
    2. 2. Context <ul><li>Beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Expected to take on the same responsibilities as more experienced colleagues </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High attrition rate </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Rural settings </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Disproportionate numbers of beginning teachers </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Isolation </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Away from families and friends </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching in subject areas outside area of expertise </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Mentoring <ul><li>Widely used strategy for providing guidance and support for beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Many mentors are provided with little or no training </li></ul><ul><li>Mentor training is the single most important factor in contributing to mentoring success (Sweeny, 2008). </li></ul>
    4. 4. Aims of the paper <ul><ul><li>to report on the planning and implementation of a mentoring program designed to develop mentoring capacities in experienced teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>evaluate the mentoring program </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Mentor training <ul><li>From providing emotional support assisting beginning teachers through dialogue and reflection </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The characteristics of adult learners </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Effective communication skills </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encouraging mentees to reflect on their practice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li> (Evertson & Smithey, 2001) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Mentoring program content </li></ul><ul><li>Module 1. Mentoring and the mentoring role </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is mentoring and why do we need mentor training? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Different models of mentoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roles and responsibilities of mentors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Characteristics of effective mentors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building successful mentor-mentee relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Module 2. The process of mentoring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing strong interpersonal skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding the principles of adult learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding the stages of teacher development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying the concerns of beginning teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Module 3: Understanding the support needs of mentees </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Raising awareness of the needs and concerns of beginning teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing a framework for identifying and understanding the critical tasks of teaching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying and understanding the principles underlying reflective practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Utilising the cycle of reflective practice. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promoting similar reflective teaching practices in mentees. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Module 4: Planning for the future: Examining career pathways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying the stages of the mentoring process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work-life balance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing action plans for the future </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The art of letting go </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Mentor training program <ul><li>Participants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>8 teachers commenced the program but only 4 completed all the modules </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All teachers from the same high school in rural Queensland </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentoring program run in parallel with program for beginning teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pilot program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 days of workshops over a period of ~6 months (last half of school year) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Case studies, role plays </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Data collection and analysis <ul><li>Interpretative study using qualitative data </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus group interview </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal reflections of the authors </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Data analysis </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Iterative process </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Common themes emerged from the data </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Results and discussion <ul><ul><li>Mentors still perceived themselves as experts (transmission mode evident) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ If there’s a problem with a child and we’re talking about it, he’ll [mentee] say I’ve tried this, this and this. I’ve tried the things that my mentor suggested, but that doesn’t seem to work either” (Teacher E). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ She’s had a particularly bad experience with a parent recently. So I’ve had to work with her and also speak to the parent in terms of that” (Teacher M). </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Results and Discussion (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Mentoring viewed as something done to mentees (rather than with them) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ She was very stressed. So I probably used some of the techniques that I learnt on her, especially because I didn’t want to come out and say this is what you should do… So I used some of the techniques because my first person was quite confident, and the sort of person you could give little hints to.” (Teacher S). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ So really do the explicit teaching to the mentee before </li></ul><ul><li>they go and teach. That really helps, and that was a really successful unit she did” (Teacher M). </li></ul>
    11. 11. Results and discussion (cont.) <ul><ul><li>Mentoring focused on providing emotional support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We never got to discussing classroom practice. It wasn’t my preoccupation. But the personal and where she was at emotionally, things like that” (Teacher W). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Informal relationships perceived as more successful </li></ul><ul><li>“ The most successful stuff has been the sit down at the end of the day or at lunch time and jut start chatting and going through things. That’s been more successful than anything organized” (Teacher E). </li></ul>
    12. 12. Stages of the mentoring process Third Stage- Peer support & collegial relationship (Delegate) Second Stage- Mentee more self-directed in skill development & self-reflective (Collaborate) First Stage- Modelling of skills, sharing of strategies, observational feedback (Direct and explain)
    13. 13. Discussion <ul><li>While mentor program seemed to help mentors to support mentees, it did not appear to promote deep reflection of teaching practices (by mentors or mentees). </li></ul>
    14. 14. Where to from here? <ul><li>Revise mentoring program </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greater focus on developing mentors as collaborators and co-enquirers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greater focus on getting mentors to reflect deeply on their own practice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Question underlying (and often deeply held) beliefs and assumptions </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Q uestion why they are doing what they are doing (personal, academic, social and political consequences of what they are doing) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Revised mentoring program-proposed content <ul><li>Module 1. Mentoring and the mentoring role </li></ul><ul><li>What is mentoring and why do we need mentor training? </li></ul><ul><li>Different models of mentoring (e.g. as guide, advocate, critical friend, coach, role model, co-enquirer) </li></ul><ul><li>Characteristics of effective mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and building successful mentor-mentee relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Module 2. Mentors and mentees as reflective practitioners </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the principles of adult learning </li></ul><ul><li>Developing a framework for identifying and understanding the critical tasks of teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying, understanding, and using the principles underlying reflective practice </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting similar reflective teaching practices in mentees </li></ul><ul><li>Module 3: Understanding the support needs of mentees </li></ul><ul><li>Raising awareness of the needs and concerns of beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Developing effective communication skills (including difficult conversations) </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the stages of teacher development </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying the concerns of beginning teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Module 4: Developing a mentoring culture </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying and understanding the stages of mentoring relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Developing a school culture of enquiry and reflection </li></ul>
    16. 16. Conclusion <ul><li>The development of reflective practices should form an integral component of mentoring programs. For it is through these shared reflections and discussions of and around practice that communities of practice are created. </li></ul><ul><li>This is significant as “the most powerful learning comes about within ‘communities of practice’” (Wenger, 1998). </li></ul>
    17. 17. Contact details <ul><li>Dr Denise Beutel </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Rebecca Spooner-Lane </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
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