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Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Europe and Central Asia
 

Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Europe and Central Asia

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Presentation from the 2013 Atlantic Council Energy & Economic Summit expanded ministerial meeting. Presented by Marina Olshanskaya, UNDP-GEF Regional Technical Advisor, United Nations Development ...

Presentation from the 2013 Atlantic Council Energy & Economic Summit expanded ministerial meeting. Presented by Marina Olshanskaya, UNDP-GEF Regional Technical Advisor, United Nations Development Programme.

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  • The scope UNDP-GEF projects vary from local to national and regional with the main focus being on creating enabling policies and market environment for investment in building energy efficiency
  • Since 1990 - a notable trend is the rise (17%) of final energy consumption in the buildings sector in both absolute and relative terms: by 2010 it reached a 35% share in the total final energy consumption. It is now the largest energy consuming sector in Europe and Central Asia (in OECD the change was less dramatic, building sector used to be and remain largest energy user: 39%)Building energy use is characterized by high inefficiencies, especially in CIS, where it takes 2-4 times more energy to heat same space, as in EU countries with similar climatic conditions. Inefficiencies translate into dissatisfaction with quality of heating and rising energy billsNext slide please
  • Important to note that benefits of EE goes far beyond energy and monetary saving, as illustrated in the picture of a school in Uzbekistan and conditions there before and after EE retrofit
  • Next slide please
  • To correct these fundamental market failures, strong political commitment and leadership at all level, including the highest is needed. This is well illustrated by the following examples. Croatia:The Government, central and local, introduced and established energy efficiency as a policy priority and as a practical tool for effective housekeeping in the whole public sector in the country, including local and county authorities, as well as central government ministries and agencies. With UNDP-GEF support it has implemented Energy Management System covering practically all public facilities in Croatia. The country became a leader in EMS in public sector in Europe (and globally).Grant funds served as seed money, but it was the local funding that actually allowed country wide roll-out and implementation of EMS in the whole public sector.Kazakhstan: The Government adopted National Program on Housing and Utilities Development . It made mandatory the implementation of EE measures in all residential buildings undergoing major retrofits resulting in energy saving of 30-50%/per building. It also allocated state financing for building retrofits in the amount of 640 mln US dollars in 2011-2020. Grant funds served as seed money to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of thermal modernization and help design ESCO model for their implementation. Next slide please

Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Europe and Central Asia Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Europe and Central Asia Presentation Transcript