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Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival
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Carnevale italiano - Italian Carnival

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  • 1. CARNEVALE ITALIANO ITALIAN CARNIVAL Istituto Comprensivo ‘L.Montini’ Campobasso - Italy 2007-2008
  • 2. IL CARNEVALE IN ITALIA CARNIVAL IN ITALY IL CARNEVALE ITALIANO ITALIAN CARNIVAL IL CARNEVALE DI VENEZIA THE CARNIVAL OF VENICE IL CARNEVALE DI VIAREGGIO E PUTIGNANO CARNIVAL IN VIAREGGIO AND PUTIGNANO IL CARNEVALE DI IVREA IVREA CARNIVAL CURIOSITA’ CURIOSITIES
  • 3. IL CARNEVALE IN ITALIA CARNIVAL IN TALY Carnevale is celebrated in Italy on the days between the 17th January, day devoted to Saint Anthony Abbot and Shrove Tuesday. The following day, Ash Wednesday, signs the beginning of Lent. This is a period of fasting, pray and abstinence for the Catholics who, in the past, were forbidden to eat meat during the 40 days of Lent. The word Carnevale probably comes from the Latin carnem levare, meaning “farewell to meat”. There is an important link between Carnival and the lunar cycle: Carnival always coincides with the new moon. The feast of Carnival varies in time depending on Easter. Carnevale has roots in the Roman Saturnalia with elements of other celebrations that the Romans held in February. The Saturnalia was a time to eat, drink, be merry and free for the Roman people. During the Saturnalia celebrations restrictions were relaxed and the social order inverted: gambling was allowed in public and landlords and slaves changed roles. A Lord of Misrule, the king of the Saturnalia, was chosen to reign during those days. As Christianity spread, the pagan festivals were modified to become a part of the Christian calendar.
  • 4. For centuries there have been parades, dances, entertainment, music, processions of decorated floats through the streets, masked balls and parties. Children throw coriandoli or “confetti”, paper streamers and flour on the people, spray silly string and play jokes on everyone. People use disguises and masks of all kinds to hide so that they can say whatever they want or become the character of their dreams for some hours. A Carnevale Ogni Scherzo Vale, “Anything goes at Carnival” is the expression most used by Italians during this period when every type of fun is permissible and there is no limit to eating until the start of Lent. The most famous masks, which are the emblem of Carnival, are the costumes of La Commedia dell‘ Arte, an important form of theatre developed around the 16th century. http://www.sipario.it/masc.htm Carnevale in Italy is different in every region and each city or town has its own tradition. Some carnivals last a week or more although Carnival is actually one date. There are “serious” carnivals, based on historical themes and full of medieval costumes and jousting knights, “satirical” carnivals which make fun of politicians and religion, “eating” carnivals which gather people in the main squares where they cook lots of goodies and “artistic” carnivals, like the one in Venice.
  • 5. IL CARNEVALE DI VENEZIA THE CARNIVAL OF VENICE Beautiful masks and elaborate costumes play an important role in the Venice Carnival. You can see them in the squares, along the canals, over the bridges, on gondolas … everywhere. People from all over Italy, participate in masked balls and general festivities or enjoy theatrical and dance performances, exhibitions and concerts. This tradition was first recorded in 1268. It reached its peak of popularity in the 18th century. During this period nobles wore the Bauta, a mask that covers only the upper part of the face, permitting the wearer to drink, eat and talk easily. This mask was worn together with a black cloak. After the Austrians took control of Venice in 1798, the Carnival fell into decline and was not celebrated for many years. In addition to that, Carnival celebrations were banned by the fascist government in the 1930s. In the middle of the 1900s it became popular again. Carnival traditions are the same, but every year the theme is different.
  • 6. IL CARNEVALE DI VIAREGGIO E DI PUTIGNANO CARNIVAL IN VIAREGGIO AND PUTIGNANO Viareggio and Putignano are both famous for their Carnival parades. Their magnificent floats feature giant caricatures of politicians and personalities in papier-mâché that describe embarrassing or allegorical scenes. The floats are usually accompanied by masked people of all ages. Putignano boasts the oldest parade; in fact the first Carnevale celebrated in this city can be traced back to 1394. Viareggio Carnival is 135 years old: it was born in 1873 as a folk event.
  • 7. IL CARNEVALE DI IVREA IVREA CARNIVAL The carnival centers around a unique, exciting, anachronistic and most of all juicy orange battle in Ivrea, near Turin. The battle is an allegoric representation of a local insurrection, in 1194, against the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick of Swabia, Barbarossa (Red Beard). The orange throwing is the event with the greatest collective participation: anybody can take part by enlisting in one of the nine teams on foot or becoming a member of a carriage crew. Battles take place all over town. All the squares have "safe" areas from which the event can be observed. The main events take place on the Saturday, Sunday, and Monday running up to the grand finale on Shrove Tuesday.
  • 8. SAINT ANTHONY ABBOT Saint Anthony Abbot was an Egyptian hermit who gave all his possessions to the poor and spent several years living in the desert. The Saint is always pictured with a pig because according to some legends, he cured a pig that became his faithful companion and he treated skin diseases with applications of pork fat. The feast of Saint Anthony Abbot takes place on 17th January, the date of his death. It is an ancient rural ceremony known as “the Blessing of animals” as he is the patron of domestic animals. The parish priest blesses the animals brought to church. A fire burns outside the church. All the people meet there because the fire has the meaning to increase positive strengths and defend the evil diseases.
  • 9. CURIOSITA’ CURIOSITIES  The most ancient Italian Carnival is that of Fano which goes back to 1347 .  The longest Carnivals in Italy are the “Ambrosiano” in Milan which finishes the first Saturday of Lent and the Putignano Carnival which starts on 26° December and finishes at Ashes.  The first allegorical Italian floats were built in Viareggio in 1873.  Confetti were invented by a man from Milan. These coloured paper disks replaced the seeds of coriander plant covered of chalk which were thrown on people.

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