Bentley University Japan Study Tour 2007

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  • Nissan Highlights: 3,000 welds per automobile and 95% of the welds are done by robots 800 total robots in the plant, 340 of which are in the body shop 60 cars per hour production 60% of cars produced are direct-orders from customers (efficiency & cost savings) Ship between 2,000-3200 cars per week (80% of which is destined for U.S.) (Human) Error Rate: 14-15 per day (per 460 vehicles) 2.4% Female employees Avg. tenure = 18 years!! “ Human Friendly” assembly line Each worker needs to be able to master 3 floor processes 2 x 15 min coffee breaks and 1 hour lunch, then switch process McCann Erickson (ad agency): The value of street-cred 1 st Presenter spoke about: 1) Trend setters and 2) Hiroshi Fujiwara = The don of streetwear fashion in Japan (Stussy, Evisu, etc.) 2 nd Presenter = Mizo, the Sr. Director of Creativity for McCann Erickson (long hair, ponytail, probably 50 or so) Gartner = We were given presentation by the President of Gartner, Japan Nobuhiko Hidaka (prior to Gartner, spent 28 years at IBM) Japan Laser Co. = Mr. Kondo Interesting tidbit: In an effort to improve the language skills of his employees: TOEFL Challenge (2 years to earn passing score) Score: 990 = Grade: S = 500K (yen) Score: 900 = Grade: A = 350K Score: 800 = Grade: B = 25K Wellington = Boston-based investment management firm Kellog Company:
  • Strong work ethic = PWC (Richard Cook, Director of Auditing) = capsule hotels for the salarymen! Keiretsu = a practice in which manufacturers, suppliers and distributors work together in closely-knit groups, almost like one big happy family Male-dominated society = many companies had few if any women in the executive management ranks - although many of the folks we spoke with said there is a big push to change this in both the corporate world and in society in general.
  • Historically Japan’s been a male-dominated culture. In the past, women weren’t really expected to go to college and go on to have successful careers… they were expected to get married, cook, clean, and raise (hopefully, male) children for their traditional-thinking Japanese husbands. Japanese gender roles are going thru a transformation as women begin to break away from this traditional line of thinking, and society becomes more accepting of these changes. More and more women are entering the workforce, postponing (or forgoing completely) the idea of marriage, and instead are focusing on their careers. I remember reading a study that one of our presenters handed out that claimed the percentage of single people in Japan recently surpassed that of all other industrialized nations. I think it was like 43% of men and 54% of women in their late twenties and early thirties were single in 2004. It also claimed that the decline in marriage is mostly the result of a shift in the lifestyle choices of urban Japanese women and the fact that gender equality is starting to really take hold in Japan’s society.
  • Almost 13.5 hours after leaving Chicago’s O’Hare Intntl Airport…… we finally arrive. As I'm sure you all know, Tokyo is Japan's capital and its' largest city. Its got a population of around 13 million and a population density almost 10x that of Los Angeles!
  • -- Shinkjuku: Large entertainment, shopping and business district. Shinjuku Station is Japan's busiest railway station, served by six railway companies and about a dozen railway and subway lines.
  • -- Shinkjuku: Large entertainment, shopping and business district. Shinjuku Station is Japan's busiest railway station, served by six railway companies and about a dozen railway and subway lines, including the JR Yamanote Line.
  • Shibuya: Busy district for the younger (mid-late 20’s) crowd…
  • Shibuya: Busy district for the younger crowd (party-goers, etc.).
  • -- Akihabara: Akihabara (short: Akiba) is a district in central Tokyo, famous for its many electronics shops. In recent years, it’s also gained fame as a center of the gaming, manga and animation culture. Hundreds of electronics shops are packed around Akihabara Station and along Chuo Dori (Chuo Avenue). They offer everything from the latest PC’s , cameras, TV’s, mobile phones and home appliances to second-hand items and lots of electronic junk.
  • -- Ginza: Famous shopping and entertainment district. One square meter of land in the district's center is worth more than ten million yen (more than $100,000US)!!! It’s one of the most expensive real estate sections in the world. Virtually every leading brand name in fashion and cosmetics has set up shop here: Rolex, Loius Vitton (the list is endless)
  • -- Ginza3
  • -- Kamakura: Kamakura is a coastal town in Kanagawa prefecture, about an hour south of Tokyo. Today, Kamakura is a popular tourist destination…. With several temples , shrines and other historical monuments. Another popular attraction are its sandy beaches .
  • -- Kamakura: Kamakura is a coastal town in Kanagawa prefecture, about an hour south of Tokyo. Today, Kamakura is a popular tourist destination…. With several temples , shrines and other historical monuments. Another popular attraction are its sandy beaches .
  • -- Kamakura: The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a bronze statue that is located on the grounds of the Kotokuin Temple. With a height of 13.35 meters, and a weight of 120 tons, it is the second largest Buddha statue in Japan. The statue was cast entirely of bronze in 1252 and originally located inside a large temple. In the 15 th century, the temple buildings were washed away by a giant tsunami and since then the Buddha stands in the open.
  • -- Kamakura: The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a bronze statue that is located on the grounds of the Kotokuin Temple. With a height of 13.35 meters, it is the second largest Buddha statue in Japan. The statue was cast (of bronze) in 1252 and originally located inside a large temple hall. The temple buildings were washed away by a tsunami tidal wave in the end of the 15th century, and since then the Buddha stands in the open air.
  • -- Kamakura: The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a bronze statue that is located on the grounds of the Kotokuin Temple. With a height of 13.35 meters, it is the second largest Buddha statue in Japan. The statue was cast (of bronze) in 1252 and originally located inside a large temple hall. The temple buildings were washed away by a tsunami tidal wave in the end of the 15th century, and since then the Buddha stands in the open air.
  • -- Kamakura: Hachimangu: Kamakura's most important shrine. It was founded in 1063, and enlarged and moved to its current site in 1180 by Minamoto Yoritomo, the founder of the Kamakura government. The shrine is dedicated to Hachiman, the patron god of the Minamoto family and of the samurai in general.
  • Kyoto was Japan's capital and the emperor's residence from 794 until 1868. It is now the country's seventh largest city with a population of 1.4 million people. Kinkakuji (a.k.a. The Golden Pavilion) is a Zen temple formally known as Rokuonji. Construction started on the Golden Pavilion in 1397 as part of a new residence for the retired shogun (military ruler) Ashikaga Yoshimitsu. Kinkakuji was converted into a Zen temple after Yoshimitsu's death in 1408.
  • Kyoto was Japan's capital and the emperor's residence from 794 until 1868. It is now the country's seventh largest city with a population of 1.4 million people. This is what a 700 year old tree looks like…
  • Nippon Professional Baseball or NPB is the highest level of baseball in Japan. NPB consists of two leagues, the Central League (i.e. American League w DH) and the Pacific League (i.e. National Leauge with no DH). There are two lower-level professional minor leagues, the Eastern League and the Western League, that play shorter schedules. The season starts in late March / early April and ends in October with two or three all star games in and around July.
  • Nippon Professional Baseball or NPB is the highest level of baseball in Japan. NPB consists of two leagues, the Central League (i.e. American League w DH) and the Pacific League (i.e. National Leauge with no DH). There are two lower-level professional minor leagues, the Eastern League and the Western League, that play shorter schedules. The season starts in late March / early April and ends in October with two or three all star games in and around July.
  • Nippon Professional Baseball or NPB is the highest level of baseball in Japan. NPB consists of two leagues, the Central League (i.e. American League w DH) and the Pacific League (i.e. National Leauge with no DH). There are two lower-level professional minor leagues, the Eastern League and the Western League, that play shorter schedules. The season starts in late March / early April and ends in October with two or three all star games in and around July.
  • Absolute MANIAC
  • Officially designated as Japan's national sport... although baseball is considered to be the most popular today.
  • Officially designated as Japan's national sport... although baseball is considered to be the most popular today.
  • Officially designated as Japan's national sport... although baseball is considered to be the most popular today.
  • Tsukiji Fish Market
  • Tsukiji Fish Market

Transcript

  • 1. ID790: Japanese Culture & Business Practices May 12 – 27, 2007 Matt Marengi
  • 2. Some of the Firms We Visited
    • Nissan – Oppama Manufacturing Plant
    • McCann Erickson
    • Japan Laser Corp.
    • American Chamber of Commerce, JP
    • Gartner Japan, Ltd.
    • Amazon.com.jp
    • PriceWaterHouseCoopers, JP
    • Wellington Investment Management
    • American Embassy, Japan
    • Keio University - Graduate School of Business
    • Sumitomo Corporation
    • Kellogg Company
  • 3. Business/Economic Landscape Japan vs. USA
    • Similarities
        • Size – Japan has 2 nd largest GDP
        • Strong work ethic
        • Mastery of high-technology
    • Differences
        • Tighter government-industry cooperation
        • Keiretsu
        • Lifetime employment
        • Seniority vs. merit-based promotion
        • More conservative, risk-averse
        • Non-confrontational
        • Male dominated
  • 4. Demographic Changes & Social Concerns
    • Declining birth rate / population
        • Pop. peaked in 2004
    • Aging society
        • Avg. life expect. = 81.25 years (#1)
    • Homogenous society
        • Immigration Rate: <1%
    • Rise in gender equality
  • 5. Now for the fun stuff…
    • Tokyo…finally!
  • 6. First night’s dinner...
  • 7. Shinjuku
  • 8. Shinjuku 2
  • 9. Shibuya
  • 10. Shibuya 2
  • 11. Akihabara
  • 12. Ginza
  • 13. Ginza 3
  • 14. Kamakura
  • 15. Kamakura 2
  • 16. Kamakura 3
  • 17. Kamakura 5
  • 18. Kamakura 6
  • 19. Kamakura 7
  • 20. Kyoto
  • 21. Kyoto 2
  • 22. NBL: Chiba Lotte Marines
  • 23. NBL: Chiba Lotte Marines 2
  • 24. NBL: Chiba Lotte Marines 3
  • 25. Marines Super-Fan
  • 26. Sumo
  • 27. Sumo
  • 28. Sumo 3
  • 29. Mt. Fuji
    • Just West of Tokyo
        • 45 minute shinkansen ride (180MPH)
    • Highest mountain in Japan
        • 12,388 feet (2776m)
    • Surrounded by 5 lakes
    • Still active
        • 1707
    • Inspired Atari and Infiniti logos
  • 30. Mt. Fuji 2
  • 31. Mt. Fuji 3
  • 32. Get your fresh,hot…peanuts!?!
  • 33. Tsukiji Fish Market 2
  • 34. Tsukiji Fish Market 5