Regency Fashion in Winter
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Regency Fashion in Winter

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    Regency Fashion in Winter Regency Fashion in Winter Document Transcript

    • exzxÇvç Ytá{|ÉÇ |Ç j|ÇàxÜ Pelisses, spencers, cloaks, redingotes: What did a lady wear for the colder months during the Regency? Step inside the pages of this little ebook and you’ll get an idea. This is not a treatise or costume reference book, mind you, but an entertaining look at fashions of yesteryear. All in all, I think it was more difficult to stay warmer for women than men during the regency (when outdoors) and as the century wore on, women’s clothing became smarter and more protective. But don’t take my word for it: Take a peek and see for yourself! Above: A fine dress for colder weather. Notice the velvety quality of the fabric. No doubt it was heavy, but the short sleeves and low bodice explains the warm shawl or cloak which you can see has been artfully allowed to drape around her for the portrait. I like the furry edging on the shawl (or cloak?). The pillow may have been to supply greater warmth for her feet while she sat for the portrait. Left: Not a winter dress particularly, but the shawl suggests chillier weather. Shawls were not just accessories to look pretty or complement an outfit—they were truly necessary for comfort. During the day, women could wear long-sleeved garments which provided greater warmth, but if they went anywhere in the evening where they would be among company, short sleeves were generally the rule. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Right: A daytime outfit (painted after the regency, I believe) but showing that even with long sleeves, a shawl or cloak was still a comfort to have on hand. The lady has removed her bonnet, however, which suggests the day was warmer than she expected. Left: Walking Costume, 1815. Doesn’t appear particularly warm, and was probably suitable only for spring or early autumn. Right: We usually see the oft- depicted Mademoiselle Recamier when she is young (and scantily clad); here, she is older, and dressed quite warmly. High ruff on the neck, a sturdy cap, a shawl and warm material for her dress all infer that this portrait was done during winter. The dress sleeves look very substantial, almost quilted in their effect. (puffy). Overall, a nice comfortable ensemble for colder days. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Long sleeves, one or more petticoats, stockings, a shawl and scarf (and bonnet) do not seem to suffice for this young woman. She also wears gloves and flimsy shoes (they even called them “slippers”)’ as well as “ice skates.” The gentleman, to my eyes, looks warmer here, as ever. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Left: The costume on this young lady lacks only the scarf of her counterpart, above, for warmth; and her shawl is light and open, suggesting milder weather. If twelve years have gone by (suggested by the earlier date on the pic, above), it is surprising how similarly the women are dressed. Right: 19th Century shoes. Sturdier than the “slippers” favored for evening wear during the Regency. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Left: 1817 Walking Dress. Much more sensible and warmer than what we’ve seen, previously. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • The child, above, in the confectioner’s shop, gets to wear pantalettes. Ladies out of the school room had to make do with stockings, though in winter these would be woolen. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Right: No year is given, unfortunately, but this costume is designed for colder seasons. Nevertheless, the area around the ankles and lower legs must have been chilly. Love that lush scarf, and tiny matching reticule! Below: A woman who liked ruffles and bows, to be sure! She looks warm, however, and sports one of the fanciest caps I’ve seen. Right: 1833. After the death of George IV, and not regency, but still four years preceding Victoria. The clothing is much sturdier and warmer looking. In winter, an overcoat or heavy shawl would go over the gowns. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Heartening to see that here, in November 1816 “Dinner Dress” includes a long sleeved spencer over the gown. The matching head-dress no doubt helped keep its wearer warm as well. The woman also wears buff-yellow colored gloves. (But did she eat with them on? I doubt it!) Below: In the absence of a pelisse or redingote, women wore shawls. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Both women are wearing spencers. The dark red on the left woman looks warmer, while the one on the left is highly adorned.To make up for short sleeves, perhaps, she wears long gloves and carries a wide scarf or shawl. (The writing says “Dame in Spencer.”) Left: The flimsy gown is no match for the weather. (Most women of the day would have found this highly mortifying.) Caption: “Ah, such wind!” Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Later Regency: On the right, a higher hemline and lower waist is an indication of being later in the Regency, as well as the highly adorned “hems”. Below left: For once, a really warm cloak! In Before the Season Ends, Miss Ariana Forsythe sports a similar design, a pelisse that is “ermine lined and edged, worth every shilling,” according to her aunt, Mrs. Bentley. Below, right: Much earlier, 1799. Both gowns have an overdress making them unusually sturdy. Notice that the hems fall to the ground. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Above, right, and below: Quintessential Regency winter wear—not nearly as effective at protecting a lady from the elements as the style on the left. The redingote on the ladies on the right (above, right, and right) happen to be red, but they could be any colour. . Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • An Idealized Winter Scene Here we have winter outdoors and in. Above, a painting by Frank Dadd, gives us an affectionate, idealized glimpse into the past. Right: “Winter” On the right “Winter,” is an old print, which shows, remarkably, an entire family huddling around the fire in one room, while allowing the elder son (or daughter) the use of the other room to dance and frolic with friends. Now take a look at an illustration from 1890, and contrast the outerwear of the women to what we have seen on Regency women: Heavy fur coats, muffs, & high collars. It’s about time! (Even Victorian women had better outerwear than regencians, however.) Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Here are a few illustrations of men from the day. Having the advantage of shirts and voluminous cravats that kept the upper chest and neck covered was an advantage during the colder months. Women could easily do this during the day, (wear high-collared gowns, for instance) but evening wear required a lower-cut bodice. Additionally, the popularity of leather or deerskin breeches and pantaloons was superior for leg warmth say, than stockings, and men could also wear woolens beneath their attire. I hope you’ve enjoyed this small glimpse into regency winter wear! Below, a few terms to make sure you’ve got your clothing right: Pelisse—a long outer garment, usually lined or edged with fur. Redingote-- a long, unlined, lightweight coat, open down the front, worn by women. Cloak—a loose outer garment. In Georgian days, cloaks were often hooded; Cape—a Sleeveless garment, usually hanging over the shoulders and back, and tied at the neck. Mantle—Similar to a cape but shorter. A winter mantle is seen on pg. 11, bottom. Spencer—a short, tight-fitting garment, often made to match a gown; removable, with long sleeves. There were spencers for men as well as women. Stole--a woman's shoulder scarf of fur, marabou, silk, or other material. Also called a tippet. Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.
    • Pattens—For the feet during rainy or snowy weather, pattens were protective overshoes worn over one’s shoes. Jane Austen wrote of the “ceaseless click of pattens” in Bath, England. . Half-boots-Still popular today, a boot extending just above the ankle. Muff—a case for the hands covered with fur or other soft material, for women and girls. Other Accessories: Umbrella, Reticule, Scarf or boa, Shawl and (of course) gloves. Two more male outdoor illustrations. Morning dress for women (above) was conducive to warmth and comfort. Linore Rose Burkard writes Inspirational Romance for the Jane Austen Soul. Her characters take you back in time to experience life and love during the Regency England era (circa 1800 – 1830). Ms. Burkard’s novels include Before the Season Ends, The House on Grosvenor Square, and, The Country House Courtship. Her stories blend Christian faith and romance with well-researched details from the Regency period. Romance for the Jane Austen Soul: Experience a romantic age, where manners and morals are timeless; and happy endings are always possible. For more information, visit: www.LinoreRoseBurkard.com Brought to you by Inspirational Romance Author Linore Rose Burkard.