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Empowering Our Say in Health Care Reform
 

Empowering Our Say in Health Care Reform

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Where do you stand on Health Care Reform?

Where do you stand on Health Care Reform?

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    Empowering Our Say in Health Care Reform Empowering Our Say in Health Care Reform Presentation Transcript

    • THE WORLD AS IT IS VERSUS THE WORLD AS IT SHOULD BE Isn’t that what this whole Health Care Reform initiative is about? SINGLE PAYER WOULD CALL UPON ALL SECTORS OF OUR SOCIETY TO CO-FINANCE A UNIVERAL HEALTH CARE FUND FOR ALL AMERICANS In today’s complex world, no problem has an easy solution. Complexity requires that any reform effort take into account the obvious. That is the purpose of this document, to walk you though our existing system’s obvious defects and promote active debate on how to move forward
    •  
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT’S A BUSINESS THAT OPERATES ON A NEGATIVE PREMISE.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT’S A BUSINESS THAT OPERATES ON A NEGATIVE PREMISE. We pay . . .
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT’S A BUSINESS THAT OPERATES ON A NEGATIVE PREMISE. We pay . . . For something they don’t want to do .
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT’S A BUSINESS THAT OPERATES ON A NEGATIVE PREMISE. We pay . . . For something they don’t want to do . That … in and of itself … makes no sense.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers;
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer;
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer; 3. In our very lives as we move around and are dropped and added to different insurance policies.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer; 3. In our very lives as we move around and are dropped and added to different insurance policies. 1. We fear the financial consequences of illness;
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer; 3. In our very lives as we move around and are dropped and added to different insurance policies. 1. We fear the financial consequences of illness; 2. So we pay for private health insurance;
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer; 3. In our very lives as we move around and are dropped and added to different insurance policies. 1. We fear the financial consequences of illness; 2. So we pay for private health insurance; 3. Someone in our policy group gets sick;
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK IT PROSPERS FROM 2 OPERATIONAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES: #1 DIVIDE & CONQUER; #2 FEAR Our Population is divided . . . 1. Between insurers; 2. Between policy holders within an insurer; 3. In our very lives as we move around and are dropped and added to different insurance policies. 1. We fear the financial consequences of illness; 2. So we pay for private health insurance; 3. Someone in our policy group gets sick; 4. Coverage costs more and we pay because …(go to #1 above)
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK PHI’s two self-reinforcing premises: 1. To act responsibly, Americans must insure their health; 2. Making it mandatory is like your auto or home owner’s insurance obligation.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 1. “Responsibility” or “Right”
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 1. “Responsibility” or “Right”
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 1. “Responsibility” or “Right” Premise 1. “A commodity that is your responsiblity to pay” or “ A basic right” -- The conclusion to this question will be taken up in Section 3, after taking into account how production, consumption and environmental factors affect our health –
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2. Making it mandatory is like your auto or home owner’s insurance obligation.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of AFFORDABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of AFFORDABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of AFFORDABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of AFFORDABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of AFFORDABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of REPLACEABILITY. Property is not like People
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of REPLACEABILITY. Property is not like People One body per lifetime, whatever it’s health
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of REPLACEABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of REPLACEABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Car and Home Owner’s Insurance protects us against EVENTUALITIES Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of PROBABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Car and Home Owner’s Insurance protects us against EVENTUALITIES People’s health needs to be insured against the INEVITABLE . We’re bound to get sick. Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of PROBABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of PROBABILITY.
    • 1. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE (PHI) REPLACE WHAT DOES NOT WORK Premise 2 – Mandatory Health Insurance : A question of PROBABILITY.
    •  
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources.
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources. .. the AIR we BREATH ( pollution and CO2 ) The enormous volume of CO2 emissions released into the atmosphere is upsetting its chemical balance. This imbalance has not only triggered global warming but potentially compromises the very air we breath. Add to this all the other pollutants that affect air quality and our health, and its obvious we have a serious problem.
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE .. the AIR we BREATH ( pollution and CO2 ) .. the WATER we DRINK ( dumping/sewage ) Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources. In a single year, polluters dumped more than 232 million pounds of toxic chemicals into our nation’s rivers and streams. Nationwide, polluters contaminated the drinking water of 23 million Americans. In the last 5 years, industry has violated water pollution laws half a million times. 1 in 10 Americans have been exposed to drinking water that contains dangerous chemicals or fails to meet federal health benchmarks in other ways.
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE .. the AIR we BREATH ( pollution and CO2 ) .. the WATER we DRINK ( dumping/sewage ) .. the LAND we EXHAUST ( overuse/misuse ) Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources. Environmental Groups are stepping up their opposition to the coal industries practice of removing the tops of moun-tains with explosives. 500 individual peaks have been removed – the equivalent of 1.2 million acres of land the size of the state of Delaware. In two-thirds of the mountain top removal operations, valley fill is the sister practice of dumping the remaining waste in valleys. In 99% of the valleys some type of water source will be affected. It was true then (1958 Silent Spring) and it holds true now. We are poisoning the earth with chemicals.
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE .. the AIR we BREATH ( pollution and CO2 ) .. the WATER we DRINK ( dumping/sewage ) .. the LAND we EXHAUST ( overuse/misuse ) .. the FOODS we EAT ( processed/empty ) Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources. ‘ You are what you eat’ and in food you find completely synthetic ingredients, quasi-edible substances that ultimately do not come from a corn or soybean field but from a petroleum refinery or chemical plant. These chemicals are what make modern processed foods possible. Chemicals, sweeteners, hormones … our bodies are exposed to it all, with grave implications for our national health. From premature menstruation in girls, to breast formation in boys. From obesity to alarming levels of diabetes. The dietary health of America is in trouble.
    • 2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEALTH AND HOW WE LIVE .. the AIR we BREATH ( pollution and CO2 ) .. the WATER we DRINK ( dumping/sewage ) .. the LAND we EXHAUST ( overuse/misuse ) .. the FOODS we EAT ( processed/empty ) .. the WARS we Wage ( injury/trauma/death ) Our planet, and our health, are affected by our choices and use of the earth’s resources. Since 2003, we see a jump in the number of returning Veterans seeking VA health care. How many deserving soldiers have returned home to be denied care? Might there be a relationship between the Iraq War and the rising costs of health care?
    •  
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    • 3. Heath Care is not a Commodity but a Basic Right
      • The health issues we face as a Nation are not just a matter of choice, but are intrinsic to our very way of life, which is reflected in how we produce the goods we consume.
      • In the early 1900’s, thousands working in factories and mines were exposed to work-related risks and, through the union movement, labor gained workman’s compensation benefits – the earliest form of American Health Insurance for job related injuries.
      • Over the decades, the risks to health has shifted out of the workplace and into the general environment. The greater risk to our health is through exposure to toxins from resource extraction, agricultural production and chemical processing – making it likely that illness will surface from some non-work related exposure.
      • The American employer-based health insurance system was born out of the congressional defeat of President Truman’s National Health Plan of 1949. The pressures brought to bare by the American Medical Association and Businesses contributed to the plan’s defeat.
      • Today, the Health Insurance Industry that opposes reform. They have everything to lose should Health Care gain its rightful place as a hard-won worker’s right, extended to ‘citizen’s right’ given the generalized risks that threaten our national health.
      • Health Care as a ‘right’ shifts the burden from “individual” to “social” responsibility. But how do we pay for it when the Nation is Broke? Collectively through Single Payer.
    •  
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER First we must address “why our Nation is broke”. During President Bush’s term, the National Debt went from President Clinton’s low of 57.7% of GDP to the Bush Era high of 78.1% of GDP in his last year of office (+20 pts).
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER
      • Likely contributors to this 20 point increase:
      • Iraq & Afghanistan Wars : $769 Billion dollars
      • SEC exemption of brokerage firms from market risk rules (or ‘borrowing-to-assets ration’) in April 2004. This opened the flood gates for credit default swaps trading, now know as high stakes betting for the super rich. In 2008:
      • Worldwide, there was more in Complex Derivatives than Stocks and Bonds.
      • For the $1 Trillion dollars in sub-prime mortgages, there are $62 trillion dollars in Credit Default swaps
      • 3. Wall Street Bailout the conversion of paper financial losses (i.e., nothing with any real value) into a binding taxpayer debt. Cost estimated at $2 trillion dollars by 11/09.
      • These details, too, form the story of ‘how we live’. Money corrupts political outcomes.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER
      • Likely contributors to this 20 point increase:
      • Iraq & Afghanistan Wars : $769 Billion dollars
      • SEC exemption of brokerage firms from market risk rules (or ‘borrowing-to-assets ration’) in April 2004. This opened the flood gates for credit default swaps trading, now know as high stakes betting for the super rich. In 2008:
      • Worldwide, there was more in Complex Derivatives than Stocks and Bonds.
      • For the $1 Trillion dollars in sub-prime mortgages, there are $62 trillion dollars in Credit Default swaps
      • 3. Wall Street Bailout the conversion of paper financial losses (i.e., nothing with any real value) into a binding taxpayer debt. Cost estimated at $2 trillion dollars by 11/09.
      • These details, too, form the story of ‘how we live’. Money corrupts political outcomes.
      • It is important to place our Health Care Reform effort into the context of the US Economic Crisis. In particular, the staggering rise in the National Debt raises two important points:
      • Tax Codes and Regulations have been changed to favor the wealthy at the expense of the National Welfare .
      • While the Nation is broke, and unemployment has reached 9.8% , money is still flowing to the wealthy or to corporations in the defense and finance sectors, to name a few.
      • The current economic crisis is not required to justify National Health Care Reform. It does – however – place Health Care Reform into a strategic place in our National Economic Recovery. Without the right reform, the spiraling costs of health care will be yet another reality pushing the US deeper into crisis.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Don’t perpetuate PHI by obligating Americans to pay Health Care Insurance. Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end & back-end). The Baucus Health Care Reform Price tag is set to $856 billion over a 10 year period, and foresees middle class families paying 13% of their earnings in Health Insurance Premiums (not including cost-sharing concepts like co-payments, deductibles) The Baucus Plan leaves a back-door penalty that an employer or family must pay if they do not enroll. What happens when most opt out and pay the penalty? Will they still have access to health care? Will the Public Option be viable? Aren’t we asking those with the least likely ability to pay (i.e., those outside the employer covered health care network) to be one of the legs in the Financing Stool of the Public Option? Do we even know how many legs the stool has?
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Don’t perpetuate PHI by obligating Americans to pay Health Care Insurance. Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end & back-end).
      • Obligating Health Insurance at 13% of median income sounds like tax, only its collected by the Private Health Insurance Industry (PHI), not government.
      • All for what? To sustain and perpetuate the PHI model throughout the whole of American. By default, PHI becomes the “designated driver” of our reformed Health Care System making PHI stronger while we remain weak :
      • our risk pool remains fragmented
      • or contributions (i.e., our purchasing power) remain fragmented.
      • We don’t have to do it this way.
      • For the welfare of our Nation we must consider an alternative – Single Payer
      The Baucus Health Care Reform Price tag is set to $856 billion over a 10 year period, and foresees middle class families paying 13% of their earnings in Health Insurance Premiums (not including cost-sharing concepts like co-payments, deductibles) The Baucus Plan leaves a back-door penalty that an employer or family must pay if they do not enroll. What happens when most opt out and pay the penalty? Will they still have access to health care? Will the Public Option be viable? Aren’t we asking those with the least likely ability to pay (i.e., those outside the employer covered health care network) to be one of the legs in the Financing Stool of the Public Option? Do we even know how many legs the stool has?
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. STRATEGICALLY TAXING FRONT-END ( INCOME / WEALTH / FLOW OF MONEY )
      • Place a Health Care Tax on income/wealth across many sectors. Businesses and their employees should not be expected to shoulder the financing of our National Health Care System.
      • 2% Employee Contribution on Wages Earned
      • 2% Employer Contribution on Wages Paid
      • 5% on earnings above $500,000 a year
      • 5% on Oil, Chemical and Finance Industry profits
      • 1% on money created by the Federal Reserve Bank and lent to Banks (currently @ 0%).
      • 2% on all Government Subcontracting of essential government services
      • 5% on hedge funds and non-traditional high yield trading instruments
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. STRATEGICALLY TAXING FRONT-END ( INCOME / WEALTH / FLOW OF MONEY )
      • Place a Health Care Tax on income/wealth across many sectors. Businesses and their employees should not be expected to shoulder the financing of our National Health Care System.
      • 2% Employee Contribution on Wages Earned
      • 2% Employer Contribution on Wages Paid
      • 5% on earnings above $500,000 a year
      • 5% on Oil, Chemical and Finance Industry profits
      • 1% on money created by the Federal Reserve Bank and lent to Banks (currently @ 0%).
      • 2% on all Government Subcontracting of essential government services
      • 5% on hedge funds and non-traditional high yield trading instruments
      STRATEGICALLY TAXING BACK-END ( CONSUMPTION )
      • Place a 2% tax on gas, utilities and consumer goods (like food, cigarettes, alcohol, cloths, guns, etc.). By taxing consumption, we cast a wider net for financing Health Care, because:
      • The tax not only applies to what we produce in the US (i.e. what’s part of our GDP), but what we import (ex: 60% of the petroleum products we consume comes from oil imports).
      • By taxing utilities and gas consumption, industry will make a contribution to Heath Care.
      • By taxing food, everyone contributes, even unreported earnings (ex: purchases made w/illicit drug money).
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. Business will match employee contributions to health care. At 2%, this is lower than the 14% average currently paid on median incomes.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. With a 2% Tax on Income and the application of a 2% Tax on Consumer Goods, the cost to Median Income Households will not exceed 4% of earnings when spending is within means.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. Earnings in excess of median incomes will result in higher nominal contributions. It could be possible to justify a tiered Health Care Tax on income when this adjustment can be offset with sufficient contributions from other taxed sectors.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. The taxing of other sectors, that contributed to our systemic crisis, is vital to capturing sufficient funds for Health Care (oil/industry/banking).
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. Ideally , the Health Care Tax applied to income and consumer goods can be managed by State Government. These contributions will represent the States capacity to pay Health Care Providers for services rendered.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. The taxing of other sectors may be a shared strategy between the State and the Federal Government. A formula must be defined for allocating Federally Collected Health Care Taxes to the States.
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. With a 2% Tax on Income and the application of a 2% Tax on Consumer Goods, the cost to Median Income Households will not exceed 4% of earnings when spending is within means. Earnings in excess of median incomes will result in higher nominal contributions. It could be possible to justify a tiered Health Care Tax on income when this adjustment can be offset with sufficient contributions from other taxed sectors. Ideally , the Health Care Tax applied to income and consumer goods can be managed by State Government. These contributions will represent the States capacity to pay Health Care Providers for services rendered. The taxing of other sectors may be a shared strategy between the State and the Federal Government. A formula must be defined for allocating Federally Collected Health Care Taxes to the States. Transparency will require that any charging of the Single Payer Tax be an isolated item on the transaction document, be it Pay Stub, Sales Receipt or any other instrument where the tax is effectively assessed for collection . Business will match employees contribution to health care. At 2%, this is lower than the 14% average currently paid on median incomes. The taxing of other sectors, that contributed to our systemic crisis, is vital to capturing sufficient funds for Health Care (oil/industry/banking).
    • 3. NO TO PUBLIC OPTION WITH PHI YES TO SINGLE PAYER Consolidate our Health Care Purchasing Power through Taxes (front-end/back-end). Reference Point: Health Care Costs represent 18% of GDP or $2.5 trillion. The percentages and mix of sectors to be taxed for Health Care is suggestive only. It is to support the case that there are more ways than one to approach Health Care Financing. The most prudent and just approach is to spread the burden . The more legs to the stool for Health Care Financing, the greater the safety in the event that one leg or more drop-off or dip in our current crisis.
    •  
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly , and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    • 4. SINGLE PAYER: HOW IT COULD WORK 1. Single Payer Contributions are Pooled by State; 2. Any Citizen can join the Single Payer Risk Pool and is Issued a Health Card; 3. See Your Doctor/Receive Required Preventative Care and Treatment; 4. Health Care Providers Bill the State Directly, and are paid from Pooled Contributions
    •  
      • Conclusion
      • Whether you agree, disagree or are undecided about the points made here, you must look into what’s at stake, take a position and join the debate.
      • And for those that do agree, there is some good news!
      • 1. While we do not have what we need in the Senate Finance Committee bill, Congress has the legislation it needs to move Single Payer to the forefront:
        • H.R. 676: US National Health Insurance Act (Rep. Conyers, D-MI)
        • S. 703: American Health Security Act of 2009 (Sen. Sanders, I-VT)
      • To date, H.R. 676 has been endorsed by 20 medical organizations, six faith organizations, over 45 municipalities, and over 465 unions.
      • Talk or write to your elected officials. Urge their support of HR676 & S703.
      • Visit
      • to see what is going on in your city to support single payer.
      • CONVICTION, ACTION & RESOLVE CAN LEAD TO A SINGLE PAYER VICTORY
      • Conclusion
      • Whether you agree, disagree or are undecided about the points made here, you must look into what’s at stake, take a position and join the debate.
      • For those who support the Single Payer approach to Health Care Reform,
      • here is some good news!
      • 1. While we do not have what we need in the Senate Finance Committee bill, Congress has the legislation it needs to move Single Payer to the forefront:
        • H.R. 676: US National Health Insurance Act (Rep. Conyers, D-MI)
        • S. 703: American Health Security Act of 2009 (Sen. Sanders, I-VT)
      • To date, H.R. 676 has been endorsed by 20 medical organizations, six faith organizations, over 45 municipalities, and over 465 unions.
      • Talk or write to your elected officials. Urge their support of HR676 & S703.
      • Visit
      • to see what is going on in your city to support single payer.
      • CONVICTION, ACTION & RESOLVE CAN LEAD TO A SINGLE PAYER VICTORY
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    • CONVICTION, ACTION & RESOLVE CAN LEAD TO A SINGLE PAYER VICTORY WE HAVE TO BELIEVE THAT WE CAN INFLUENCE CHANGE AND BRING THE WORLD CLOSER TO WHAT IT SHOULD BE